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Dave 'Dino' DeNatale's 'Final Thoughts' after Chardon and St. Edward capture Ohio high school state football championships

Dino looks back on another magical day for Northeast Ohio high school football in Canton!

Author: Dave "Dino" DeNatale

Published: 12:13 AM EST December 4, 2021

Updated: 12:13 AM EST December 4, 2021

CANTON, Ohio — Today's one of those days where I can say I have the best job in the world. I spent eight hours calling two high school football state championship games in an amazing setting in Canton.

Let's get to some final thoughts from Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium after both Chardon and St. Edward captured state titles during our WKYC.com doubleheader:

1. Let's start with Chardon, who got all they could handle from Hamilton's Father Badin but gutted out a 21-14 victory for their second straight Division III state championship. The Hilltoppers never seemed to lose their focus this year, although head coach Mitch Hewitt told me that he and the coaching staff took the players to task after a 27-14 playoff win over Canfield.

"We ripped them in films because we thought they weren't improving," Hewitt explained. The team responded with its best practice of the year that following Monday and never looked back the rest of the way.

2. Mitch Hewitt loves Chardon, and Chardon loves Mitch Hewitt.

"There's nowhere else I'd rather be. There's nowhere else that I'd rather raise my kids," he told me. As a running back and linebacker, Mitch led the Hilltoppers to a berth in the 1998 state title game. Now as a coach at his alma mater, Hewitt has won back-to-back state championships.

Can it continue? "The kids that walk through our hallways are great kids that come from great homes. As long as we can maintain that, Chardon football is going to have a great future."

Translation: He's not going anywhere, and the Hilltoppers aren't either.

Also talked with @SMitchHewitt about @topperfb winning the battle on the line of scrimmage, plus the feeling of bringing another state title home to Chardon. @wkyc @toppernation pic.twitter.com/Kw1qwT0Ddf
— Dave DeNatale (@dinocleveland) December 4, 2021

3. I thought the key to Chardon's win was an adjustment they made on offense in the second half. They were able to get A.J. Bruce involved in the Wing T swinging around the ends. He rushed for 88 yards on 7 carries with a touchdown in the second half.

4. And as almost always seemingly happens in these state championship games, special teams plays a huge role. Chardon was able to take advantage of a short punt by Badin and put together a 29-yard drive, capped off by Sean Carr's touchdown run to win it with just over a minute to play. In the nightcap, Springfield gave up a safety due to a bad punt snap and Joel Castleberry blocked a field goal in the 4th quarter to help seal the St. Edward victory.

5. St. Edward is so good at playing complimentary football. Danny Enovitch ran for 210 yards and two touchdowns, the defense came up with numerous stops in the red zone, and they never make a mistake in their kicking game. When Christian Ramon fumbled in the 4th quarter, his defensive teammates picked him right up and came up with a huge stop to keep the Eagles up by two possessions.

"We're a team," St. Edward head coach Tom Lombardo told me afterwards. "It's not one facet. We're together and even though we have mostly one-way players, kids know how to pick each other up. That's how it works."

Caught up with @SEHS_FOOTBALL head coach Tom Lombardo after the Eagles' 23-13 state title win over Springfield. Complimentary football in full effect tonight. Plus, what will he remember most about this squad? @wkyc pic.twitter.com/nOgATveekU
— Dave DeNatale (@dinocleveland) December 4, 2021

6. So the Hilltoppers get their second state title, while St. Edward picks up number five. That sets the stage for Kirtland on Saturday night as the Hornets will look to win their fourth straight state championship and seventh overall. They've got a boatload of streaks on the line as well as they'll face a very good Versailles team in the Division V state championship game.

Tyler Carey will join me for all of the action from here in Canton on WKYC.com, the WKYC app, Facebook Live, and YouTube. Our coverage will begin at 7:20 p.m. Talk to you then!

Cleveland MSNBC WEWS-TV Cable
Published 19 hours ago

Will Carey bring home the state championship?

Dec 04, 2021 12:00 AM

That’s the question we asked staff members of The Courier and The Advertiser-Tribune. Below are their predictions for today’s title game with Coldwater.

Jeremy Speer, Publisher, The Courier and The Advertiser-Tribune
David vs. Goliath. Coldwater has history on its side — this will be the seventh year in the past 10 the Cavaliers have played in the state title game. As always, Coldwater is sharpened by playing in the nation’s best small-school league, the Midwest Athletic Conference, which has three teams playing for state titles this weekend.
But there is just something about this Carey team. Any doubts to the Blue Devils’ belonging were quieted with never-in-doubt wins against Ashland Crestview, Liberty Center and New Middletown Springfield.
The Blue Devils have a team-of-destiny feel with a dominant defense and offense that is clicking on all cylinders. Plus, a business-like approach through this run indicates Carey might not be as intimidated as one might think. The slingshot hits the mark.
Carey 28, Coldwater 22

Matt Nye, Sports Editor, The Advertiser-Tribune
I'm torn making this pick. I've seen Carey up close the last two weeks and it looks to be dominating in every facet of the game. Behind a huge offensive line, with a plethora of running backs and the emergence of Jordan Vallejo, I could easily see Carey doing to Coldwater what it has done this entire season, minus Hopewell-Loudon in Week 1. The Blue Devils will have a serious chance in this game if they can do what they do — run the ball, keep the chains moving, avoid turnovers and play solid defense. But Coldwater is here every year it seems like. It has the championship pedigree. It plays in the best conference in the state and have a QB who will throw for over 3,000 yards. Carey has not seen a passing offense like this all season, and its secondary has not been tested like it will be today throughout the playoffs to this point. This pick is tough, but Coldwater's experience and passing game will overcome.
Coldwater 28, Carey 14.

Zach Baker, Sports Editor, The Courier.
Last week, Coldwater got an early pick six to help spur a rout against West Jefferson in the state semis. In what figures to be a physical contest, Carey will need to avoid turnovers and control the football.
I think the Blue Devils can do that. But will it be enough to win?
My feeling is teams out Midwest Athletic Conference are too tough and eventually the Cavaliers will wear Carey down.
Coldwater 28, Carey 17

Dave Hanneman, Sports Writer, The Courier
The Blue Devils must do two things: score touchdowns when they get in the red zone, because they won’t get many opportunities, and they must block out the almost mystical aura that MAC schools have that they do not, will not and cannot be beaten in state championship games. Will it be easy? No! Can it be done? Why not?
Carey 28, Coldwater 21

John Montgomery, Sports Writer, The Advertiser-Tribune
Carey's had a magical season that I'm afraid ends in a defeat Saturday. The Blue Devils, winners of 14 straight, face a juggernaut of a team and a program in Coldwater. The Cavaliers, the reigning Division VI state champs, have won the state title seven times and ended second in six other trips. Both teams bring stout defenses — Coldwater allows just 12.9 points per game and Carey gives up just 9.1 — and each faced six playoff-bound teams in the regular season. Carey's bruising rushing attack, led by 6-1, 265-pound Jordan Vallejo, has proven formidable. But Coldwater's Reece Dellinger has thrown for more than 2,900 yards throughout the season and 1,200 yards in the playoffs. The Cavaliers' two losses have been by a combined 10 points, including 24-21 to unbeaten conference foe Marion Local who plays Saturday for a Division VII state title. I see Coldwater winning.
Coldwater 35, Carey 21.

Dylan Frazier, Sports Writer, The Courier
I think at this point, Carey has proven to everyone that it belongs. It has not only made it to the state championship game, but it has made pretty easy work in doing so. The Blue Devils have outscored their opponents 152-34 in five postseason games.
The two-headed monster of Jordan Vallejo (544 rush yards, 9 TDs) and Derek Lonsway (379, 5 TDs) have rushed for over 900 yards and 14 scores during this run. They don’t hide it — they ground it, they pound it, and they punch you in the mouth.
Then there's the Blue Devil defense, which is equally as intimidating.
In 15 games, Carey has allowed just 9.1 points per game and forced opposing offenses into 25 turnovers. If Bryce Conti has some free time this summer, he should put on a clinic on how to intercept the quarterback...he has eight this season and the most in school history.
That said, I’m hard-pressed to bet against a MAC school in December, especially the reigning D-VI state champion in Coldwater.
But the passing attack that the Cavs have — one that Carey hasn’t had to use much this season — is one of, if not the biggest reason I’m thinking Coldwater will repeat as champions.
Then again, Carey has gotten this far by beating teams that people said were better than they were. So what’s one more time?
Coldwater34, Carey 20

Josh Morgret, Sports Writer, The Advertiser-Tribune/The Courier
I've been watching Carey from afar and I have been thoroughly impressed with the Blue Devils. I have only watched one of Carey's games this year and it came in the impressive romp over Liberty Center. My running joke for quite a few weeks was I would rather see Carey and Hopewell-Loudon rematch if nothing else, due to the fact that both squads rolled through a vast majority of the season. If the Blue Devils can get its running game going and guzzle clock away with extensive drives, I think Carey has a good chance to win. The Blue Devils CAN NOT be intimidated by the fact that Coldwater is from the Midwest Athletic Conference. If Carey gets behind and needs to pass, it may be in trouble. My prediction is that the size and girth of the Carey offensive line wears down the Cavaliers in the second half and Carey brings home the big gold shiny trophy.
Carey 28, Coldwater 20.

Tiffin Advertiser Tribune
Published 19 hours ago

Letting go doesn't mean you have to lose

Dec 04, 2021 12:00 AM

Dear Readers: Thank you for all your responses to "Letting Go Is Hard to Do." We have undeniably wonderful parents among our readership. Here are two of my favorite letters.
Dear Annie: This is in response to "Letting Go Is Hard to Do," who was worried about the choices her daughter might be making at college after seeing a questionable bank transaction.
I am also the mom of a college-age student. We have had a joint account ever since my son was a senior in high school.
I made a promise to myself to not allow our joint checking accounts to be a way to peek into his world. Trust me, it is very hard not to look — especially when I am transferring money to his account. If his spending info pops up, I look away and put my hand over so I cannot see.
It is a don't-see-don't-tell trust that I never told him I had in place. He is very independent, and if I'd have questioned things, he would have started to mistrust me. There is always a way teens get around roadblocks; it's called taking cash out of the account and spending it that way or buying a Visa gift card with the cash.
It gets easier as they get older to not look. I encourage you to think about why you need to look at how she spends her money. My son was no angel for a good four to five years. But he trusts me now, and when the really hard/big things come up, he comes to me for comfort and direction, and to ease his fears. Let a little more of the string go, and when your bird flies, you will be rewarded with trust and honesty. — Money and Trust
Dear Annie: I want to be as polite as I can in this reply to the mom who's concerned about her 18-year-old daughter essentially just being an 18-year-old away at college.
With all due respect, Letting Go — because you sound like a great mom and you seem to have a good bond with your daughter — maybe drop the "God's gift" talk, stop thinking about what your religion teaches about birth control and just ask your kid if she's OK and let her know you're there to talk.
She may not be as interested as you are in what God and your religious community's leadership thinks about her sex life. Meanwhile, here on Earth, you're both humans who love each other. Lead with that.
In terms of sex addiction and so-called addictive behaviors, aka symptoms of a disease called addiction, which aren't "behaviors" in an addict but rather compulsions, again, be honest. Talk about it head-on. Don't minimize it if you're truly worried.
And if you're not, let her live her life and keep your opinions to yourself. You can either have a relationship that is close, honest and real or have some mix of hope, denial and religious idealism. But the half-measure of trying to have both almost guarantees the first will be lost, which would be a shame.
Keep your life between you and God, her life between you and her, and trust God to know how to handle the rest. God is too busy caring for billions of souls to really care much about birth control and sex toys. Take God's lead. — Dad of a Teen, Too
Send your questions for Annie Lane to dearannie@creators.com.

Tiffin Advertiser Tribune
Published 19 hours ago

Springfield falls to St. Edward in state title game

December 03, 2021 at 11:44 pm EST
By WHIO Staff

CANTON — The Springfield Wildcats looked to cap off a historic season in Canton, but fell short in the Division 1 State Championship game.

The Wildcats faced off against the St. Edward Eagles at Hall of Fame Stadium Friday evening.

The Eagles started the game with a long run, but were stopped from scoring thanks to four goal-line stops by the Wildcats defense.

>> Springfield native John Legend sends well wishes to Wildcats ahead of state championship game

The Eagles would score and take a 7-0 lead later in the first quarter.

Another touchdown and a safety put St. Edward up 16-0 in the second quarter, but the Wildcats were able to score their first points of the game with a rushing touchdown by quarterback Te’sean Smoot.

The Wildcats missed a field goal to end the first half and went into the locker room trailing 16-7.

In the third quarter, the Eagles scored again and took at 23-7 lead into the final quarter.

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Smoot connected with wide receiver Anthony Brown for a touchdown in the fourth quarter, but the Wildcats missed the extra point. That touchdown was the only time either team would score in the final quarter.

The Wildcats fell to the Eagles 23-13, finishing their season 13-2.

After the game, head coach Maurice Douglass told News Center 7 that the loss will motivate the team to push harder next year.

©2021 Cox Media Group

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WHIO 1290 AM/95.7 FM
Published 19 hours ago

Margaretta's Kenna Stimmel commits to Virginia Tech

Dec 03, 2021 8:17 PM

CASTALIA — Kenna Stimmel didn’t set out to be one of the top high school pole vaulters in the country with massive college programs pursuing her.

She only started pole vaulting because it was something her older sister Kassidie did, and because once she tried dry runs on grass without even a bar to jump over, it was fun.

Only after Stimmel picked up a pole and never stopped chasing the next height, that next bit of adrenaline, the next chance for even a bit more fun, did she reach the heights of a top NCAA Division I program.

“I didn’t really think D-I,” Stimmel told the Register prior to announcing her college choice. “I was just like, ‘I want to take it to the next level.’ And then when I first started getting contact from these big D-I schools, I was like oh, so I’m only getting contacted by D-I schools. That was just crazy to think about.”

Stimmel will attend Virginia Tech on a pre-med track while vaulting for one of the top coaches in the country in that discipline, Bob Phillips. Stimmel signed her National Letter of Intent on Nov. 10 but didn’t publicly announce her decision until Friday night at Margaretta’s boys basketball game against Willard.

Virginia Tech was the choice out of Stimmel’s final five, which also included visits to Texas, Kansas, Kentucky and Louisville.

“They have a really pretty campus,” Stimmel said of Virginia Tech. “They’re all stone buildings. They’re all really pretty. The facilities are really nice. I really liked the coach.”

With the Hokies, Stimmel will be under the tutelage of Phillips, who is in his 37th year with the program. When Stimmel visited campus, Phillips told Stimmel he’d likely take her to under-20 worlds in her first year, another plus added on to the decades of wisdom Phillips possesses.

“I’ve been around pole vault since Kassidie was in seventh grade, and these guys tell me things about pole vault and I’m like, I don’t get it,” said Stimmel’s mother, Laurie. “But (Phillips) sat down and watched videos of (Kenna) and said OK this is good, and froze each individual frame and said he would change this, he would do this. I’m like, huh, I actually understand what he’s saying for once. Obviously he knows what he’s talking about.”

Stimmel, who visited Virginia Tech the weekend of Oct. 9, made her decision at 11:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 28. She signed Nov. 10 and finally got to let everyone else know her choice on Friday night.

“It’s honestly relieving that I can finish my senior year without having all that pressure and stress on me now,” Stimmel said. “That’s why I wanted to sign early, so I can just enjoy the rest of my senior year and not have to think about it any longer.”

Stimmel wrote out a pros and cons list for each of the schools she was considering. Stimmel’s visit to Virginia Tech was the weekend the Hokies hosted Notre Dame in football, so she got a glimpse of that atmosphere.

The Virginia Tech campus is picturesque, filled with older, stone buildings that look straight out of a movie. And the Hokies’ track facilities are top notch.

“As soon as I saw the buildings, obviously you don’t go to school for buildings, but it was just beautiful,” Laurie said. “It’s secluded. There’s a lot of trees. The campus is gorgeous.”

Stimmel currently hopes to follow her mother’s footsteps into the medical field. Her current aim is to be a pediatric anesthesiologist.

“I want to be that positive in a little kid’s life and make their day,” Stimmel said.

This commitment means that both Stimmel daughters will pole vault in college. Kassidie is currently at Grand Valley State University, a Division II school located in Allendale, Michigan.

Kassidie won the OHSAA Division III pole vault state championship in 2017 and 2018, and her younger sister followed in 2019 and 2021 (and likely would’ve won in 2020, too, if not for the COVID-19 cancellation of spring sports). Stimmel set and then broke her own Ohio pole vaulting record during her junior season last spring and has jumped more than 14 feet a number of times in competition.

Stimmel also won the 2021 state title in the 100-meter dash and was part of the Polar Bears’ state champion 4x100-meter relay team that included Jana Berg, Macyn Phillips and Olivia Saylor.

Both Stimmel daughters followed in their father Brian’s footsteps. He pole vaulted for Margaretta, too.

“It makes me proud of the hard work and dedication that they have in the sport and also on the academic side,” Brian said.

Once Stimmel got her decision out of the way in late October, she could focus on the conclusion of her senior volleyball season, in which she became Margaretta’s all-time digs leader and helped the Polar Bears advance to a regional final.

Then it was off to the diving board for Stimmel for one more season on Margaretta’s swim team. Soon enough she’ll be racing down the pole vault lane at area tracks for one final spring of Stimmel pole vaulting dominance.

“It’s nice,” Stimmel said, “but obviously I still have a bunch of hard work and just try to be the best I can by the end of my senior year.”

But this spring will just be the end of one chapter for Stimmel, who now knows where the next will begin, in Blacksburg, Virginia. She’ll wear the maroon and orange of the Hokies — she likes the maroon, especially — and keep clearing a higher and higher bar.

The heights Stimmel can reach are still to be determined, but she’ll have a legendary coach by her side for the next four years helping her get there. And nothing has stopped Stimmel from pole vaulting ever higher yet.

Sandusky Register
Published 19 hours ago

No. 14 Utah beats No. 10 Oregon 38-10 for 1st Rose Bowl bid

Devin Lloyd returned an interception for a touchdown, Cam Rising threw for another score and No. 14 Utah clinched the first Rose Bowl berth in school history with a 38-10 victory over No. 10 Oregon in the Pac-12 championship game.

33 mins ago

By JOSH DUBOWAP Sports Writer

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Devin Lloyd returned an interception for a touchdown, Cam Rising threw for another score and No. 14 Utah clinched the first Rose Bowl berth in school history with a 38-10 victory over No. 10 Oregon in the Pac-12 championship game Friday night.

This game was a near carbon copy of the one in Salt Lake City two weeks ago when the Utes (10-3, No. 17 CFP) jumped out early and won 38-7.

While that game all but ended the playoff hopes for Oregon (10-3, No. 10), the rematch delivered coach Kyle Whittingham and the Utes the Rose Bowl prize they had been seeking since joining the Pac-12 in 2011.

It capped an emotional last 12 months for the Utes program that has dealt with the deaths of two players.

Utah had lost its first two trips to the conference title game, including two years ago to Oregon, but left little doubt this time.

Rising engineered a TD drive on the opening possession after converting a sneak on fourth down near midfield. Tavon Thomas capped it with a 2-yard run.

Lloyd then returned an interception 34 yards for a score later in the first quarter and Utah put the game away by scoring twice in the final 27 seconds of the first half.

Rising hit Dalton Kincaid on an 11-yard pass with 27 seconds left. Then Malone Mataele intercepted an ill-advised pass from Anthony Brown to set up Jadon Redding's 50-yard field goal on the final play of the half to make it 23-0.

Thomas and T.J. Pledger added TD runs in the second half for the Utes to the delight of the huge contingent of Utah fans among the 56.511 in attendance for the first title game in Las Vegas.

THE TAKEAWAY

Oregon: The Ducks had playoff aspirations after winning at Ohio State in September, but struggled to maintain that level of play. They were upset at Stanford on Oct. 2 before getting outscored 76-17 by Utah in two losses over the final three weeks and were denied a third straight conference title.

Utah: The Utes are playing as well as almost anybody in the country late late in the season with six straight wins. But back-to-back losses in September to BYU and San Diego State before Rising took over as starting quarterback mean the Pac-12 champion will miss the College Football Playoff for a fifth straight season.

MOMENT OF LOUDNESS

There was an emotional moment during a break in the second quarter when the Utah fans took part in their ”moment of loudness" to honor Ty Jordan and Aaron Lowe, who both died of gunshot wounds nine months apart.

A video tribute was played as fans lit up the stadium with cell phone flashlights and cheered. The Utes have held the “moment of loudness" instead of moments of silence to honor the former players.

Lowe’s mom, Donna Lowe-Sterns, also served as an honorary captain for the game.

UP NEXT

Oregon: A bowl game to be determined.

Utah: The Rose Bowl on Jan. 1 against a Big Ten team.

___

More AP college football: https://apnews.com/hub/college-football and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25. Sign up for the AP’s college football newsletter: https://apnews.com/cfbtop25

WFMJ 21 - TV
Published 19 hours ago

Van Wert Board of Education to meet

Submitted information

The regular monthly meeting of the Van Wert City Schools Board of Education will be held at 5 p.m. Wednesday, December 15, in the First Federal Lecture Hall at the Niswonger Performing Arts Center.

POSTED: 12/04/21 at 12:00 am. FILED UNDER: News

Van Wert Independent
Published 19 hours ago

Matamoras Minute: Service stations

In last week’s article one of the service stations mentioned was that owned by Frank “Pat” Hall.

He and his wife, Alice, were in business until their retirement in 1979, and their records indicated mechanical work done on more than 64,000 cars.

Their garage was located first on the site where the Matamoras city building is now located. The business opened in 1937 as a Sinclair station. J.P. Huling of Marietta, the Sinclair distributor, said he wanted to be the first customer and he bought a dollar’s worth of gas. Hall kept that exact bill his entire life.

There was a break in their conduct of business when World War II occurred. They moved their family to Canton and worked in a defense plant. When the war was won they returned to Matamoras and opened once again. As the military men came home the station became a popular meeting place. Also Grandview Avenue was no longer the highway through town having been replaced by Park Avenue. So in 1946 they moved alongside the new highway after building a new station. Their home was next door.

The first mechanic ever hired by the couple was George Swallow. Frank learned to be a mechanic and worked his way into a fine reputation. He would say that the fewest number of cars he ever worked on in a day was five.

During a contest the station won a prize from the Pepsi Cola Company for the most cases of their soda sold. And their ice cream was one of legend.

Alice was the “dipper” with 25 cents buying an ice cream cone way past a double dipper. A thick milkshake also sold for 25 cents in the 1950s.

At noon and after school the ice cream counter was full of students. Teachers were known to treat their class on special occasions. The record was when the first four grades of school came as a group and 162 ice cream cones were dipped. The offering of ice cream came to a close in 1968 when the Halls switched to Sunoco gas.

Schools provided another source of revenue as well.

For a decade the station did the mechanical work on all Matamoras school buses, as well as those from Bloomfield.

In addition Frank drove a school bus for 15 years.

John Miller is president of the Matamoras Area Historical Society. Membership dues are $15 per year single/couple. Life membership is $150. Contact the society at P.O. Box 1846. New Matamoras, Ohio 45767. Much of this column is built on the work of Matamoras’ historian, the late Diana McMahan.

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Marietta Times
Published 19 hours ago

Quakers too much for Tigers, 69-33

NEW PHILADELPHIA — A big win on the court in the home opener for the New Philadelphia boys’ basketball team made head coach Matt Voll very happy on Friday night.

But what he said he really enjoyed was getting back to a “basketball atmosphere.”

A decent size crowd and a boisterous student section in the Quaker gym pushed New Phila right from the start, and the Quakers dominated Marietta 69-33 in an East Central Ohio League contest.

“To have a gym that had an atmosphere like we had tonight was really, really fun for the guys and all of us,” said Voll, comparing Friday’s game to the restricted-attendance contests in place a season ago amid the COVID-19 pandemic. “I know the guys could feel the crowd and it just gave them an energy and a confidence, too.”

The Quakers (2-0 overall and 1-0 ECOL) were hot from the start as junior Michael Vickers opened the game with a breakaway slam dunk that propelled New Phila to an early lead it would never give up. The Quakers held a 41-20 margin at halftime and then blew the game wide open in the third quarter, outscoring Marietta 20-4 to take a commanding 61-24 advantage into the final period.

The Quakers produced an impressive 19 assists on their 29 made baskets, and Vickers came within one (nine total) of tying the school record for assists in a single game at 10, held by Steve Shade.

Three New Philadelphia players hit double figures for the game, as senior big man Jadan Lowery led the team with 15 points, and senior Kayden Schoelles and junior Carter Vandall had 12 each. A total of nine of the 11 players who saw playing time scored for the Quakers.

New Phila made 29 of 49 shots from the floor, including seven of 22 in 3-point attempts, and added four of seven free throws.

On defense, the Quakers frequently were in the passing lanes and frustrated Marietta after a decent first quarter. The Tigers had only 20 points over the final three quarters of the game.

“Defensively, I thought our guys took some great angles and were able to take away a lot of the things that (Marietta) wanted to do,” Voll said. “But the best part is that we had a lot of contributions from all of the guys at both ends of the floor. It was good to be at home and to play well.”

Marietta was led in scoring by senior Tyler Kytta with 16 points. The Tigers made 12 of 36 shots (two of eight 3-pointers) and were forced into 21 turnovers by the New Phila defense.

The Quakers turn right back around and head to Fort Frye on Saturday night to cap off a three-game week to open the season, while the Tigers get a week off before hosting Warren.

Marietta Times
Published 19 hours ago

Give Local MOV

Photos by Evan Bevins The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation’s Marian Clowes, associate director for community leadership, and Julie Posey, development and communications officer, man the table at the Give Local MOV 2022 kickoff event Tuesday morning at Superior Toyota on Seventh Street in Parkersburg.

PARKERSBURG — Local nonprofits took time on Giving Tuesday to look ahead to one of the biggest fundraisers in the Mid-Ohio Valley.

The Parkersburg Area Community Foundation and Regional Affiliates kicked off Give Local MOV 2022 on Tuesday morning at Superior Toyota on Seventh Street in Parkersburg. The 24-hour online giving day is set for Tuesday, May 3, and Superior is again the lead sponsor, providing $30,000 to start building the pot of matching funds.

“This is from all the employees at Superior, who work hard and take care of our customers so we can afford to be charitable,” said T.R. Hathaway, Superior Toyota owner.

The 2021 edition of Give Local raised more than $502,000 for 60 local programs, causes and organizations, impacting missions that support animals, the arts, education, health, youth development and more in the foundation’s 11-county service area, according to a release from PACF.

In addition to spotlighting participating entities and encouraging people to donate, the event provides a variety of matching funds and incentive prizes to boost the amounts given. The PACF hopes to offer at least $175,000 in matching funds for this year’s program.

“Sponsors like Superior Toyota are what pushes this campaign forward, and we are so grateful for their continued support; we hope that others will also step up to sponsor this campaign to help encourage gifts to our region’s nonprofit and school partners,” Julie Posey, the foundation’s development and communications officer, said in the release.

Rather than a formal event, Tuesday’s kickoff was held outside at Superior, with representatives of participating nonprofits dropping in to pick up registration information and coffee and pastries provided by the Bodega. Posey said the format was chosen because of continuing uncertainty about the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We know our area nonprofits were and continue to be hit hard by this pandemic with decreased revenue and increased demand for their services,” she said in the release. “Give Local MOV is an excellent and easy way to give back to our community and support your favorite organizations’ hard work.”

Humane Society of Parkersburg Executive Director Gary McIntyre said the organization has a strong donor base year-round but the additional funds available through Give Local are quite beneficial. In years past, the money has helped with special projects, but in 2020 it was needed for operations.

Julie Nutter, program manager for The Children’s Listening Place, said Give Local is the biggest fundraiser of the year for the organization, which conducts forensic interviews of children in cases of child abuse, neglect and sexual abuse.

“We have a blast with (the event),” Nutter said. “It’s a lot of fun.”

Evan Bevins can be reached at ebevins@newsandsentinel.com.

Give Local MOV 2022

• Give Local MOV 2022 is planned for May 3.

• Local charities with a charitable fund managed by the Parkersburg Area Community Foundation are invited to participate.

• Any new funds created with the foundation that benefit 501(c)3 nonprofit organizations or schools formed before Dec. 31, 2021, also can participate.

• More information is available by calling the foundation at 304-428-4438.

• Residents of the community are invited to like the Give Local MOV Facebook page and visit GiveLocalMOV.org.

Marietta Times
Published 19 hours ago

Belpre teen grows her leadership abilities

Photo provided Williams stands with her family, Chad Williams (father), Lori Williams (mother) and Drew Williams (brother) during senior night volleyball game.

BELPRE — Halee Williams, 17, is a proud senior of Belpre High School. Williams has spent a lot of her time in high school showing off her school pride through playing sports and co-leading the school’s spirit club.

“I have participated in varsity volleyball, basketball, and softball,” she said.

Williams is captain in all three sports.

“When I became a co-leader of the spirit committee I gained the responsibility of creating a positive and better environment for school spirit,” Williams explained. “To me, being a leader means being someone my team and coaches can count on.”

Williams said she would not be the person and leader she is today without her peers, coaches, teammates, and family.

“Overall, having my peers and teammates count on me and look to me for ideas and answers is the reason I enjoy being a leader.”

Aside from her time with sports, Williams is also a member of the student council and national honors society.

“After being a leader for the past three years in high school, I’ve learned how to be more open minded and understanding when dealing with different problems,” she said.

Williams referenced “having to understand someone and how they think, even if I thought they were wrong” as an example of a skill she has improved upon since stepping up into leadership roles.

Williams said there is a philosophy called “Ubuntu” that her basketball team has been learning about.

“One way to describe it is ‘I am because we are,’ meaning I affect my team and they affect me.”

Williams said she feels this this philosophy can be used outside of sports and can be applied to school and academics.

After high school, Williams, who is already taking a few college courses on top of maintaining her busy schedule, said she wants to major in psychology and become a mental health therapist.

She said seeing how others deal with their version of adversities and the reason behind those feelings inspired her to take interest in the profession.

Madeline Scarborough can be reached at mscarborough@newsandsentinel.com

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Marietta Times
Published 19 hours ago

Heintschel inducted into St. John's hall of fame

One of Ohio's all-time leaders in basketball coaching victories was inducted into the St. John's Jesuit athletic hall of fame during halftime of the Titans' game against rival St. Francis de Sales on Friday night at the University of Toledo's Savage Arena.

Ed Heintschel was honored in a halftime on-court ceremony and at a reception in the arena's Grogan Room.

It was a fitting arrangement for Heintschel, 71, who coached Titans basketball for 46 years, including the final 40 as head coach.

He had graduated in 1968 from St. Francis, having played basketball for the Knights, and later earned his bachelor's and master’s degrees from UT.

While guiding the St. John's varsity from 1979-80 through 2018-19, Heintschel posted a 725-224 overall record (.764 winning percentage), including 17 league championships, 16 district titles, and six trips to the Division I state final four in Columbus. His 1993, 1996 and 2004 Titans finished as state runners-up.

Many of Heintschel’s former players later competed at the collegiate level, including more than 20 at Division I programs. Two — John Amaechi and Brian Roberts — played in the NBA. His 725 wins rank No. 4 all-time among Ohio high school boys basketball coaches.

But, beyond all the court success and the luxury of working with several All-Ohio players, what Heintschel said he is most proud of is the way he and his Titans shared the journey.

“We developed a winning program where we won with class and lost with dignity,” Heintschel said. “We respected the game, and our opponent. That was really important to me, that we treated the game with respect. It's a great game.”

These days, in retirement, Heintschel resides in Addison, Mich., near Silver Lake, not far from Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn.

“The days just go by,” he said. “I get up and read The Blade, do crossword puzzles, and some other games to try to keep my mind going. I swim in Adrian at a workout facility at Lenawee Christian School. I swim at Silver Lake in the summer. I'm right by MIS. I can hear the cars when NASCAR is there.”

Some aspects of coaching he misses, others he does not.

“The thing I miss is mostly the interaction with the kids and different people, even the officials, although some people might find that hard to believe,” Heintschel said. “I miss coaching those big games. But, in terms of the day-to-day stuff, I'm good. Forty years was a long time to do it. I think I experienced everything I needed to experience.

“What I don't miss is the time it takes. In retirement, the biggest difference is [available] time. It's simply not a factor now. Your life revolved around time – class time, practice time, your deadlines. When you retire, time is not as much a factor. That is a relief.”

Heintschel, who was inducted into the City League hall of fame on Nov. 1, will be inducted in to the Ohio High School Basketball Coaches Association hall of fame on April 23. He describes his passion for basketball as a “labor of love.”

“I wouldn't say all of it, but a good amount of it was,” he said. “You wouldn't do it so long if a lot of it wasn't. When it was done right — and that wasn't all the time — it was almost like a ballet.

“Great athletes out there performing, and doing things that I could only dream of doing. I was very much a 'Do as I say' not a 'Do as I did' coach. I was very limited as a player.

“Coaching gives you a chance to stay involved with the sport. It was the only sport I played [in high school], and I loved playing it. I played it all the time, into my 30s until my body gave out. Coaching was a great way to stay involved and enjoy the competition.”

The game was passion for Heintschel, but not an obsession.

“I cared passionately about what I was doing, but rarely took it home other than watching film and stuff like that,” he said. “I felt like, when I was home, it was family time. Did I think about it some [at home]? I absolutely did.

“But I wouldn't say it was there the first thing when I woke up, or the last thing before I went to sleep. I found out that the more I tried to stay open about other things, the better it was. But, you also have to have some great players, which we had.”

During his journey he bonded him to two distinct groups.

“Most of my life revolved around two families — my own personal family, which obviously I cared about very much, and also the St. John's family,” Heintschel said. “It went beyond basketball, but basketball was the cornerstone of that.

“At St. John's, I went from being a young, young man to being a man, to be being a middle-aged man, to being kind of an old man through my time there.”

After he graduated from UT in 1972, Heintschel was a volunteer freshman basketball assistant at St. John's in 1973-74. He began teaching at the school, became an assistant football coach, and was the JV basketball coach for five years before becoming head coach in 1979.

His first Titans team lost its first eight games before finally recording its first victory. But, the following season, Heintschel guided St. John's to its first City League championship in 1980-81.

Having retired from teaching and coaching, Heintschel occasionally catches a St. John's game, and says he is impressed with the job his successor, Mike Schoen, has done.

Schoen, a 2004 St. John's graduate, played for the Titans. He earned his degree from the University of Dayton, where he was a basketball team manager, and later became Heintschel's assistant.

“I thought Mike did a great job last year,” Heintschel said. “There was a point in the season where he was pretty disturbed with the way they they were playing. But he stayed with it, and they got some confidence with good senior leadership.

“The cornerstone of their team was defense and toughness. Mike did a great job, and he certainly had a shot at getting to Columbus. He had them in a really good spot when that thing fell apart. No question.”

St. John's shared the Three Rivers Athletic Conference championship last season, and was set to play a Division I regional semifinal against Lima Senior. But coronavirus contact tracing from St. John's district semifinal opponent, Anthony Wayne, forced the Titans to withdraw from the tournament.

“It’s about time,” Schoen said of Heintschel's St. John's HOF induction. “There are very few in the history of St. John's who have done more for so long. He’s obviously extremely deserving.

“Ed was so much more than a coach. He was an administrator, English teacher, counselor, ran a grief group in the school — and he approached each role with the same mindset of helping young people.”

Heintschel's impact on Schoen was profound.

“The consistency of success throughout decades is almost incomprehensible,” he said. “He taught me how to approach every day as a player, and as a coach he taught me that there is so much more to the fame than the Xs and Os.”

As for succeeding a legend, Schoen is giving it his best shot.

“It can be daunting at times because you are standing on some extremely broad shoulders,” he said, “but there is so much support and positivity within our community, and that helps so much.”

Toledo Blade
Published 19 hours ago

Relentless pursuit of improvement leads Montana State's Daniel Hardy to success

Daniel Hardy posed no problem to Lewis Kidd. The two players faced off in one-on-one drills soon after Hardy transferred to Montana State. Kidd, an offensive lineman, realized Hardy, a defender, only turned the corner and ran the edge. He had no other moves, no other nuances to his game.

“It was super easy,” Kidd remembered thinking. “I get to go against Daniel, this shouldn’t be too hard.”

Hardy hadn’t yet developed. He was quick, but his strength needed to improve.

His athleticism was evident. As was his motor. The Bobcats believed Hardy’s relentlessness, his constant pursuit of quarterbacks, ball carriers and progress along the way, would lead him to standout accomplishments.

“This dude is going to be a freak some day,” Kidd concluded. “And he’s really grown into it and come into that this year. It’s been awesome to see him make plays. He just works his butt off. He’s gotten bigger, stronger, faster. We knew it was coming, it was just a matter of time and it’s awesome to finally see him getting his shot and making plays and helping our defense.”

Hardy was named a first-team all-Big Sky defensive end in the midst of a stellar senior season. He will once again look to lead the No. 8-seeded Bobcats (9-2) as they open the FCS playoffs with a second-round game against UT Martin (10-2) at 2 p.m. Saturday at Bobcat Stadium.

“A lot of hard work has gone into this,” Hardy said of his accolade. “It was nice to celebrate it, but that’s not important right now. We’re on a mission. Got to celebrate that for a good 12 hours, and then you’ve got to put it aside and get back to work.”

Montana State defensive end Daniel Hardy (44) closes in on Idaho quarterback Zach Borisch on Nov. 13 at Bobcat Stadium.
Shawn Raecke / Contributed

Hardy, who’s from Beaverton, Oregon, was an all-state wide receiver and linebacker at Valley Catholic High. But he only played one season of high school football before heading to College of the Siskiyous, a junior college in California.

There, he was disruptive, totaling 66 tackles, 12.5 for loss, with nine sacks to go with three forced fumbles and one recovery. He transferred to MSU the following year. He didn’t have much opportunity as a linebacker in 2018, making most of his impact on special teams.

Hardy also confessed Kidd dominated in their practice matchups. But it forced Hardy to hone his skills. Calling Kidd a “great leader, great motivator,” Hardy said Kidd was one of the key pieces of his development.

In 2019, his role steadily increased. A strong-side linebacker, he appeared in all 15 games. He started four when fellow linebacker Troy Andersen went down with a season-ending injury. Hardy concluded the year with 18 tackles, 5.5 for loss, with 1.5 sacks.

“It’s always nice to see hard work pay off,” Hardy said. “Just hitting it every day, working on the same things over and over and over again because eventually it’s going to hit. As of right now, it’s hitting.”

Then, former Bobcats head coach Jeff Choate departed for Texas. Along with him, his schemes.

When Brent Vigen became Choate’s successor, he implemented a defensive front featuring four linemen and two linebackers. If Hardy was going to see the field, he was likely going to need to make an adjustment.

MSU defensive line coach Shawn Howe said the new staff felt immediately Hardy could flourish at defensive end. But he would need to acclimate himself.

That began with gaining weight. He aimed to eat 5,600 calories a day. He reached 240 pounds, up from 220 in 2019 and 205 when he first arrived at MSU.

Over the months, Vigen noticed Hardy morphing as a player. But his motor remained.

“Just the way he attacks it constantly,” Howe said. “He absolutely has another gear. He brings it every single day, and that’s why he plays the way he plays.”

Montana State’s Daniel Hardy celebrates a play against Weber State earlier this season at Stewart Stadium in Ogden, Utah.
Garrett Becker / MSU

That translated off the field. Howe noted Hardy set alarms throughout the summer to eat and then fall back asleep to gain weight.

Along with that, he had a voracious appetite for studying film. He constantly asked Howe questions to learn about the position. It seemed Hardy’s hand never went down.

Howe lauded Hardy for his implacable approach on the field. To have that trait, Hardy needed to practice that way, to think that way, to live that way.

Howe, a former coach at USC, has worked with those who have gone on to compete in the NFL. Hardy reminds him of them.

“He’s a true pro in every sense of the word,” Howe said. “He’s great for our group because he’s a leader by example. He plays his absolute hardest. He’s involved in every single meeting. He never takes a moment off with the group, and it’s almost one of those deals where the guys feel his presence in that room and they know that we can’t let the standard down for one second. He’s unbelievable.”

Hardy’s attitude was required as he grasped the intricacies of the position. There was very little translated from linebacker in the previous scheme to where he was now.

Hardy hadn’t played out of a three-point stance, the fundamental foundation for a defensive lineman. From there, striking his target, reading his keys and training his eyes were all part of a mental process that could lead him to the correct space physically.

The more repetitions, the more comfortable he felt, the faster he could play. From the lessons he gained in the spring, to applying them to summer drills when no one else was around, Hardy’s work ethic prevailed.

“He bought into it wholeheartedly, and I think he saw it as a great opportunity for him,” Vigen said. “To become better, you need to see yourself in that role really succeeding and then just work like crazy.”

Montana State defensive end Daniel Hardy attempts to tackle Cal Poly quarterback Jaden Jones earlier this season at Bobcat Stadium.
Samuel Wilson/ Chronicle/ Report for America

Hardy “was probably born to rush the passer,” Vigen said. Hardy pressures opposing tackles to keep up with his speed. If they overadjust, he makes the most of his newfound techniques to act accordingly. He no longer has just one way of trying to win one-on-one matchups.

“He is becoming harder to block each week,” Vigen said with a laugh.

Vigen has noticed the most improvement with Hardy’s run-stopping prowess. He’s more disciplined with clogging up gaps.

The Bobcats line up their defensive ends a little wider out. Thus, they have more space to attack. Hardy does exactly that.

“He’s been awesome,” Howe said. “He’s an athletic nightmare in a matchup for guys to try and block on the run, especially with that little bit of space that we give them. He just totally manipulates guys every week.”

Hardy’s 11 sacks this season ties him for eighth in the FCS and second in the Big Sky. His 17.5 tackles for loss ties him for ninth in the FCS and fifth in the conference.

Montana State's Daniel Hardy interrupts a pass by Drake quarterback Ian Corwin on Sept. 11 at Bobcat Stadium.
RACHEL LEATHE/ CHRONICLE

Hardy’s sack total is 10th on MSU’s single-season record list. Brad Daly (2013) and Jason Hicks (1993) are tied for fifth with 14, Caleb Schreibeis (2012) and Daly (2011) are tied for seventh with 12.5 and Adam Cordeiro (2001) is ninth with 11.5. Mark Fellows (1984) owns the record with 23.

Hardy is just a half of a tackle for loss outside of the top 10. But he’s just three away from tying Daly (2013) and Mac Bignell (2015) for fourth. Fellows (1984) is the leader with 30.

Vigen said Hardy’s pass-rushing has been “exceptional.”

“He’s grown a lot from just seeing his keys, playing fast, understanding backfield sets, just becoming a student of the game,” MSU defensive coordinator Freddie Banks said. “Obviously his athletic ability helps that a lot. He’s been blessed with some gifts that not all of us have.”

Hardy’s dedication to special teams hasn’t stopped, though. He’s showcased his enthusiasm for making an impact any chance he has with booming hits on kickoffs.

Vigen believes Hardy has been MSU’s best on kickoffs. He leads the team with three tackles which have pinned opponents inside the 20 on punts or the 25 on kickoffs.

Vigen said Hardy’s selflessness will leave a lasting impact on the program. Younger players see his willingness to toil away at a new position while still remaining committed to special teams and may want to emulate him.

“He’s a guy that understands each rep he gets,” Vigen added, “whether it’s a run or pass, is so critical and he never stops.”

Montana State's Daniel Hardy tries to tackle Drake quarterback Ian Corwin earlier this season at Bobcat Stadium.
RACHEL LEATHE/ CHRONICLE

Hardy’s career has come full circle. Kidd, who moved to left tackle during the offseason, said Hardy would “kick my butt” in practice as he made his own positional adjustment. Those battles in practice forced Kidd to become better.

MSU freshman tackle Rush Reimer swiftly learned a lesson when he began practicing against Hardy.

“You for sure can’t take plays off,” he said.

Kidd added Hardy is a “monster.” He gave him credit for the career-long effort needed to reach this point.

The Bobcats may play their final game of the season this week, but Hardy laughed at the thought of that. He plans for his team to keep playing. He doesn’t intend on letting up any time soon.

This article originally ran on bozemandailychronicle.com.

Bryan Times Online
Published 19 hours ago

Dickert introduced as Wash St football coach; 3-2 as interim

December 02, 2021 at 8:42 pm EST
By NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS

SPOKANE, Wash. — (AP) — Jake Dickert was introduced Thursday as the new head football coach at Washington State and vowed to “bring the Pac-12 championship back here to Pullman, Washington.”

Dickert was elevated last week from interim coach after the Cougars pounded rival Washington 40-13 in the annual Apple Cup game in Seattle.

“My main goal is to re-energize and refocus our program,” Dickert said at a news conference with former WSU coaches Mike Price and Jim Walden in the audience. “We're going to have a lot of success.”

Dickert is a product of small-town Wisconsin, and said rural Pullman "fits me. I'm excited about setting down roots.”

Dickert posted a 3-2 record after he was appointed interim coach following the firing of Nick Rolovich on Oct. 18.

The 38-year-old Dickert was promoted from defensive coordinator after Rolovich and four assistant coaches were fired for refusing to meet the state’s mandate for employees to have received a COVID-19 vaccine or an exemption.

Dickert agreed to a five-year contract, the school announced. Terms were not disclosed.

Washington State (7-5, 6-3 Pac-12) has qualified for a bowl game, and will learn on Sunday where the team is headed.

Director of Athletics Pat Chun was asked how important the Apple Cup victory was in removing the interim label from Dickert's title.

“The Apple Cup is important, period,” Chun said, and he pointed to the image of hundreds of Washington State fans celebrating in the middle of the field at Husky Stadium while the Cougars hoisted the Apple Cup trophy.

The decision to retain Dickert “was pretty obvious in how the team performed,” Chun said.

Dickert said he would be evaluating the existing staff of assistant coaches and deciding if any would be retained. He said he expected to hire a defensive coordinator, rather than doing that job himself.

“Washington State needs a true head coach,” he said.

Dickert also said he will look at a variety of offensive schemes, not just the run-and-shoot installed by Rolovich.

“Players over plays,” Dickert said, adding the offense will build off the talents of quarterback Jayden de Laura, who blossomed this year as a sophomore.

Dickert thanked his family for the sacrifices it had made, noting at one point it moved eight times in nine years while he climbed the coaching ladder.

He also thanked his players for staying together during a season that was riven with controversy over Rolovich's vaccination status.

“Everyone came together,” Dickert said. “Seven weeks ago, we said we've got to write our own story.”

The Cougars will emphasize recruiting in the state of Washington, he said.

He also challenged “every wheat farmer in Whitman County” and “every Fortune 500 Coug” and every alumnus in between to support the program, which faces economic challenges because of its remote location.

Dickert has never been a head coach in any of his previous stops. He came to Washington State from Wyoming, joining Rolovich’s staff when he was hired before the 2020 season. Dickert worked at Wyoming for three seasons under mentor Craig Bohl, the first two as a defensive backs coach before being promoted to defensive coordinator for the Cowboys.

Prior to his time at Wyoming, Dickert bounced around several colleges including South Dakota State, Minnesota State-Mankato, Augustana, Southeast Missouri State, South Dakota and North Dakota State.

From the time he took over as the interim coach, Dickert referred to his opportunity as an interview.

Under Dickert’s leadership, the Cougars this season saw increases in scoring (by 6.5 points per game) and total offense (by 36.4 yards per game), while allowing fewer points and opponents’ total offense.

The Cougar defense has been a huge spark this season, leading the Pac-12 with 27 takeaways, while also being second in the Pac-12 in turnover margin.

Dickert played wide receiver at Wisconsin-Stevens Point from 2002-06. He earned his bachelor’s degree in secondary math education from Wisconsin-Stevens Point in 2007, and completed his master’s degree in general education, also from UW-Stevens Point in 2009.

Dickert and his wife, Candice, have three children, daughter Rylee and sons Jett and Jace.

___

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Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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WHIO 1290 AM/95.7 FM
Published 20 hours ago

Notre Dame promotes Freeman, 35, to replace Kelly as coach

December 03, 2021 at 12:46 pm EST
By JOHN FINERAN

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — (AP) — Notre Dame has completed a whirlwind coaching search that never seriously left campus, promoting defensive coordinator Marcus Freeman to coach of the Fighting Irish on Friday.

Freeman, 35, takes over less than a week after Brian Kelly’s surprising departure for LSU with the Irish still in contention for the College Football Playoff.

Notre Dame posted a video on social media of Freeman being introduced to the team at a morning workout for the first time as head coach.

“Marcus’ ability to connect with people, his fit at Notre Dame and the way he coaches young men set him apart as we went through our search process,” athletic director Jack Swarbrick said in a statement. “I can’t wait to see how the culture created by these remarkable student-athletes continues to grow under the tutelage of Marcus and his staff.”

In a statement, Freeman said he was “eternally grateful” to both Notre Dame President Rev. John Jenkins and Swarbrick for the opportunity.

"Notre Dame is a very special place and I look forward to pursuing a national championship with the most outstanding student-athletes, coaches and staff in college football,” Freeman said.

Notre Dame scheduled a news conference on campus with Freeman for Monday.

Swarbrick said Tuesday, just hours after a brief 7 a.m. meeting in which Kelly said goodbye to the team, that Notre Dame would conduct a thorough search for the storied program's 30th coach. The search didn't last long as word began to leak Wednesday afternoon that Freeman was Notre Dame’s choice.

Notre Dame officials acted fast to keep most of its staff together, with Kelly interested in bringing Freeman, offensive coordinator Tommy Rees, recruiting coordinator Mike Elston, strength and conditioning coach Matt Balis and others to Baton Rouge. Promoting Freeman was the final piece of the puzzle on Friday.

“No one is more deserving! This program is just getting started… Time to work! #FreemanEra,” linebacker JD Bertrand posted on Twitter.

Notre Dame is on a run of five consecutive seasons with double-digit victories, and its leadership decided to prioritize continuity while also taking on the risk of handing over the top job to a first-time head coach who is one of the newest members of Kelly's staff.

Kelly, who became Notre Dame's winningest coach in 12 seasons at the school, hired Freeman away from Cincinnati after the 2020 season. The former Ohio State linebacker spent four seasons with the Bearcats, helping Cincinnati develop into a playoff contender.

At Notre Dame, Freeman helped the Irish go 11-1 in what was expected to be a transition season after making the playoff. He also established himself as a vital recruiter for Notre Dame.

Less than two weeks before college football's early signing period, Notre Dame has a class of verbally committed prospects that ranks fifth in the country, according to 247 Sports.

“Marcus Freeman has not only proven himself a superb football coach, he has shown – both in his time at Notre Dame and in my conversations with him this week – that he is a person of highest integrity who cares deeply about our student-athletes and is committed to their success in the classroom as well as on the field,” Jenkins, who is in Rome, said in a statement.

The Fighting Irish have won seven straight games since their 24-13 loss at home to Cincinnati (CFP No. 4). They allowed just two touchdowns in four November games.

Independent Notre Dame is No. 6 in the CFP rankings and idle heading into conference championship weekend. But it still has a shot to be selected for the playoff. If the help the Irish need doesn't come, they are still in position for New Year's Six bowl, possibly a bid to the Fiesta in Arizona.

The Notre Dame defense got off to a shaky start under Freeman, but finished strong to rank sixth nationally in interceptions (15) and defensive touchdowns (four), seventh in sacks (40), 11th in takeaways (23) and scoring defense (18.2 points per game) and 18th in third-down conversion percentage (.329).

The 40 sacks are one shy of the school record set in 1996.

″#FreemanEra starts now!! Finish the season Strong” defensive end Isaiah Foskey, the team leader in sacks, tweeted.

___

More AP college football: https://apnews.com/hub/college-football and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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WHIO 1290 AM/95.7 FM
Published 20 hours ago

Attorney: Administrators, parents of Michigan school shooter failed to take action

by JILLIAN SMITH, The National Desk
Saturday, December 4th 2021

Mourners grieve at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

WASHINGTON (TND) — A search is underway for the parents of a teen charged with fatally shooting four of his classmates at a high school in Oakland County, Michigan.

Fifteen-year-old Ethan Crumbley is being held in jail on charges of murder, assault and terrorism, and authorities are now looking for his parents, who are facing charges in connection to the deadly incident.

On Friday, Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald announced that James and Jennifer Crumbley were each charged with four counts of involuntary manslaughter.

Andrew Duffy, a personal injury attorney, joined the National Desk Friday night to discuss the Crumbleys charges and what it will take for them to stick in court.

“What they will have to prove is that the parents created the situation and that they acted in such reckless disregard for human life, causing injury, and that they should have prevented that and had the ability to prevent that,” Duffy said. “And there are absolutely facts here because the decisions that the parents made were absolutely disgusting.”

The tragic incident is also bringing the gun control debate front and center again, with the county prosecutor making it clear that she hopes to pass better gun laws.

"I want to be really clear that these charges are intended to hold the individuals who contributed to this tragedy accountable and also send a message,” Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said. “Gun owners have a responsibility. When they fail to uphold that responsibility, there are serious and criminal consequences.”

Duffy says no matter what side of the debate you’re on, McDonald has a point about responsibility when it comes to firearms.

“She’s absolutely right, and this isn’t the typical ‘Second Amendment, don’t take away my guns’ debate,” Duffy said. “This is actually something that proponents of guns and opponents of guns can agree with. This is all about responsible gun ownership.”

According to Duffy, Michigan gun laws should not necessarily focus on keeping firearms away from people, but instead, look at what people should do once they have the gun and how they should be punished if they don’t follow the rules.

“What we have here is parents who bought a 15-year-old a SIG Sauer 9mm semi-automatic for an early Christmas present. They left it in an unlocked drawer, they gave him access to it, and most importantly, when they’re confronted with not one, but two major red flags that their child was in trouble — mental health-wise — they did absolutely nothing. So I agree that there needs to be a look at better gun laws,” Duffy said. “Because all responsible gun owners agree that their guns should be secure.”

Under Michigan's current laws, gun owners are not required to lock up their weapons. So, while many people may say it was irresponsible for the Crumbleys to allow their child access to the weapon, it’s not illegal.

“Obviously it'd be easier to have a criminal case if they violated a law. They did not violate a law, but they had reckless disregard for the lives of the students,” Duffy said. “They gave their son the gun, the murder weapon. They gave him access, open access, to it.”

While it’s true they did not commit a crime by providing the gun, he says the prosecution will be looking at how that action, and their inaction when confronted with their son’s noted behavioral issues, created an opportunity for the incident.

“They get the call about him using the internet for ammunition. They do nothing about that. And then they get called into the school after the most disturbing, vile drawing is in front of is laid out in front of them and they know they just bought their son a gun, and they do absolutely nothing. They don't ask him about it. They don't look in his backpack. They just keep their mouth shut. In fact, they say, ‘I want my son to stay in school,’ and that was an egregious violation,” he said.

But Crumbley's parents may not be the only ones being held accountable in this case.

For the teachers and administrators at Oxford High School, the warning signs were there. A teacher pulled Crumbley out of class after noticing his behavior and had the principal get involved. They then brought in a counselor and told Crumbley's parents that they had to get him mental health services within 48 hours. However, the superintendent said no discipline was warranted and they collectively allowed Crumbley to go back to class.

“I was the counselor or administrator who made the decision to send this monster back to the classroom, I would lawyer up immediately,” Duffy said. “The school had a responsibility to say, ‘you're taking your son home.’”

He adds that there should be changes within schools to protect students if there is a perceived threat.

“We need to have laws, especially in schools, when there is even an inkling that a student is going to harm another student,” he said. “I'd be really worried if I was that administrator or that counselor who sent that child back to that classroom.”

WSYX ABC 6 Columbus
Published 20 hours ago

Attorney: Administrators, parents of Michigan school shooter failed to take action

by JILLIAN SMITH, The National Desk
Saturday, December 4th 2021

Mourners grieve at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

WASHINGTON (TND) — A search is underway for the parents of a teen charged with fatally shooting four of his classmates at a high school in Oakland County, Michigan.

Fifteen-year-old Ethan Crumbley is being held in jail on charges of murder, assault and terrorism, and authorities are now looking for his parents, who are facing charges in connection to the deadly incident.

On Friday, Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald announced that James and Jennifer Crumbley were each charged with four counts of involuntary manslaughter.

Andrew Duffy, a personal injury attorney, joined the National Desk Friday night to discuss the Crumbleys charges and what it will take for them to stick in court.

“What they will have to prove is that the parents created the situation and that they acted in such reckless disregard for human life, causing injury, and that they should have prevented that and had the ability to prevent that,” Duffy said. “And there are absolutely facts here because the decisions that the parents made were absolutely disgusting.”

The tragic incident is also bringing the gun control debate front and center again, with the county prosecutor making it clear that she hopes to pass better gun laws.

"I want to be really clear that these charges are intended to hold the individuals who contributed to this tragedy accountable and also send a message,” Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said. “Gun owners have a responsibility. When they fail to uphold that responsibility, there are serious and criminal consequences.”

Duffy says no matter what side of the debate you’re on, McDonald has a point about responsibility when it comes to firearms.

“She’s absolutely right, and this isn’t the typical ‘Second Amendment, don’t take away my guns’ debate,” Duffy said. “This is actually something that proponents of guns and opponents of guns can agree with. This is all about responsible gun ownership.”

According to Duffy, Michigan gun laws should not necessarily focus on keeping firearms away from people, but instead, look at what people should do once they have the gun and how they should be punished if they don’t follow the rules.

“What we have here is parents who bought a 15-year-old a SIG Sauer 9mm semi-automatic for an early Christmas present. They left it in an unlocked drawer, they gave him access to it, and most importantly, when they’re confronted with not one, but two major red flags that their child was in trouble — mental health-wise — they did absolutely nothing. So I agree that there needs to be a look at better gun laws,” Duffy said. “Because all responsible gun owners agree that their guns should be secure.”

Under Michigan's current laws, gun owners are not required to lock up their weapons. So, while many people may say it was irresponsible for the Crumbleys to allow their child access to the weapon, it’s not illegal.

“Obviously it'd be easier to have a criminal case if they violated a law. They did not violate a law, but they had reckless disregard for the lives of the students,” Duffy said. “They gave their son the gun, the murder weapon. They gave him access, open access, to it.”

While it’s true they did not commit a crime by providing the gun, he says the prosecution will be looking at how that action, and their inaction when confronted with their son’s noted behavioral issues, created an opportunity for the incident.

“They get the call about him using the internet for ammunition. They do nothing about that. And then they get called into the school after the most disturbing, vile drawing is in front of is laid out in front of them and they know they just bought their son a gun, and they do absolutely nothing. They don't ask him about it. They don't look in his backpack. They just keep their mouth shut. In fact, they say, ‘I want my son to stay in school,’ and that was an egregious violation,” he said.

But Crumbley's parents may not be the only ones being held accountable in this case.

For the teachers and administrators at Oxford High School, the warning signs were there. A teacher pulled Crumbley out of class after noticing his behavior and had the principal get involved. They then brought in a counselor and told Crumbley's parents that they had to get him mental health services within 48 hours. However, the superintendent said no discipline was warranted and they collectively allowed Crumbley to go back to class.

“I was the counselor or administrator who made the decision to send this monster back to the classroom, I would lawyer up immediately,” Duffy said. “The school had a responsibility to say, ‘you're taking your son home.’”

He adds that there should be changes within schools to protect students if there is a perceived threat.

“We need to have laws, especially in schools, when there is even an inkling that a student is going to harm another student,” he said. “I'd be really worried if I was that administrator or that counselor who sent that child back to that classroom.”

WTOV 9 (Steubenville)
Published 20 hours ago

Submitted press release

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Mount Vernon News
Published 20 hours ago

Darlene Hard, 3-time major tennis champion, dies at 85

Hall of Fame tennis player Darlene Hard has died at age 85.

13 mins ago

By BETH HARRISAP Sports Writer

Darlene Hard, an aggressive serve-and-volley player who won three major singles titles and 18 major doubles titles in a Hall of Fame tennis career, has died. She was 85.

She died Thursday at Northridge Hospital in the Los Angeles area after a brief illness, according to Mona Cravens, director of student publications at the University of Southern California, where Hard worked for 45 years.

Hard appeared in seven major championship singles finals, winning titles at the 1960 French Championships and the 1960 and ‘61 U.S. Championships — the tournaments that preceded the French and U.S. Opens. She was a Wimbledon finalist in 1957 (losing to Althea Gibson) and ’59, and reached the quarterfinals of the Australian championships in 1962.

She had even greater success in doubles. She won three French titles, four Wimbledon titles (including 1957 with Gibson) and six U.S. championships with eight different partners. In mixed doubles, she won twice at the French and three times at Wimbledon, partnering with Rod Laver for titles in 1959 and '60.

Hard was ranked in the U.S. top 10 every year between 1954 and 1963, including four times as No. 1. She rose to No. 2 in the world in 1960 and '61.

She helped the U.S. win Wightman Cup titles against Britain four times and played on the winning U.S. Fed Cup team in 1963.

Hard played at Pomona College in 1957, competing in the first intercollegiate championship in 1958 and winning the national title. She was inducted into the school's athletic Hall of Fame in 1974. She went into the Intercollegiate Tennis Hall of Fame in 1997.

She became a member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1973.

Darlene Ruth Hard was born on Jan. 5, 1936, in Los Angeles. She was taught her power game by her mother, Ruth, on public courts in Southern California. She came along at a time when the women's game was transitioning from lengthy baseline rallies to an all-court style that was well-suited to Hard's aggressiveness.

The majority of Hard's success came during tennis' amateur era. The professional era began in 1968, and Hard played only briefly as a pro in the 1969 U.S. Open. She won her last doubles title in New York that year at age 33, six years after she had retired from serious competition to teach tennis. She lost in the second round of singles.

Cravens met Hard when she and her husband took tennis lessons from the retired champion, who kept quiet about her accomplishments. It wasn't until Cravens went to the library and did some pre-internet research that she discovered Hard's impressive career.

“She was gruff on the outside, but a real softy on the inside,” said Cravens, who became a close friend of Hard.

Cravens later offered Hard a job at USC, where she did everything from maintenance on the university's computer systems to design work on the El Rodeo yearbook and Daily Trojan newspaper.

“She had a very good eye for design,” Cravens said Friday. “She was very committed to whatever she did."

Hard is survived by her sister, Claire Brundage. She was briefly married and had no children.

___

More AP tennis: https://apnews.com/hub/tennis and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

WFMJ 21 - TV
Published 20 hours ago

US jobless rate sinks to 4.2% as many more people find jobs

Dec 03, 2021 8:30 PM

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's unemployment rate tumbled last month to its lowest point since the pandemic struck, even as employers appeared to slow their hiring — a mixed picture that pointed to a resilient economy that's putting more people to work.

The government reported Friday that businesses and other employers added just 210,000 jobs in November, the weakest monthly gain in nearly a year and less than half of October's increase of 546,000.

But other data from the Labor Department's report painted a brighter picture. The unemployment rate plummeted from 4.6% to 4.2% as a substantial 1.1 million Americans said they found jobs last month.

The U.S. economy still remains under threat from a spike in inflation, shortages of labor and supplies and the potential impact of the omicron variant of the coronavirus. But for now, Americans are spending freely, and the economy is forecast to expand at a 7% annual rate in the final three months of the year, a sharp rebound from the 2.1% pace in the previous quarter, when the delta variant hobbled growth.

Employers in some industries, such as restaurants, bars, and hotels, pulled back on hiring in November. By contrast, job growth remained solid in areas like transportation and warehousing, which are benefiting from the growth of online commerce.

The fall in the unemployment rate was particularly encouraging because it coincided with an influx of a half-million job-seekers into the labor force, most of whom quickly found work. Normally, many such people would take time to find jobs and would be counted as unemployed until they did. The influx of new job-seekers, if it continues, would help reduce the labor shortages that have bedeviled many employers since the economy began to recover from the pandemic.

“That’s good news for job seekers and workers, and for businesses too," said Julia Pollak, chief economist at online jobs site ZipRecruiter. “It looks like the supply constraints are easing a bit with the unemployment rate low and wage growth high” — two factors that often encourage people to search for work.

November's report reflects a divergence in two surveys that the government conducts each month. The unemployment rate is calculated from a survey of households. For last month, this survey found that 1.1 million more people reported that they were employed. A separate survey of employers, called the payroll survey, reported just 210,000 added jobs.

Though the results of the two surveys typically match up over the long run, they can differ sharply in any one month. For November, economists noted that the big employment gain in the household survey brought that figure in line with the larger increases in the payroll survey during previous months.

The hiring gains in the payroll survey have also been revised up substantially in recent months, and some economists suggested that this will likely happen again in coming months.

“My sense is the household estimate is closer to the truth around what is happening in the jobs market and ... should anticipate a significant upward revision to the November data next month,” said Joseph Brusuelas, an economist at RSM, a tax and advisory firm.

The household survey also captures self-employed and gig workers, whose ranks have grown steadily since the pandemic struck, unlike the payroll survey. Some economists attribute part of the nation's labor shortage to an increase in people who have recently gone to work for themselves.

Among them is Daniel Nolan of Raleigh, North Carolina. Like millions of other Americans, Nolan, 36, had his life and work upended by COVID-19. His 9-year old son was in virtual school at the outset of the pandemic. And his father-in-law, ill with cancer, moved in with his family, prompting Nolan to leave his job as a software engineer at a private equity firm.

Nolan expected this period to last only a few months. But when he began looking for work again, the job offers he got weren't what he was looking for. So in August, he decided to strike out on his own.

So far, Nolan said, he's earning roughly the same income that he did before. He plans to keep consulting for at least two more years — and may never return to a corporate job.

“I’m able to make at least as much as I was making at my previous job and still have the flexibility of being a consultant,” he said.

Friday's report showed that the number of unemployed Americans sank in November to 6.9 million, compared with the pre-pandemic number of 5.7 million. And average wages, which have been rising as employers try to attract or keep workers, increased a strong 4.8% from a year ago.

For months, employers have been struggling with worker shortages because many people who lost jobs in the pandemic have not, for various reasons, returned to the workforce. But last month, nearly 600,000 people came off the sidelines to look for jobs and were generally hired quickly. The government classifies people as unemployed only if they’re actively seeking work.

As a result, the proportion of Americans who are in the workforce rose from 61.6% to 61.8%, the first significant increase since April. If that much-anticipated development continues, it could point to stronger job growth ahead.

Even as the jobless rate has steadily declined this year, the proportion of Americans who are working or searching for jobs has barely budged, at least until this month. A shortage of job-seekers tends to limit hiring and force companies to pay more to attract and keep employees. Higher pay can help sustain spending and growth. But it can also feed inflation if businesses raise prices to offset their higher labor costs, which they often do.

Whether or not the increase in job-seekers continues is a critical question for the Federal Reserve. If the proportion of people in the workforce doesn’t rise much, it would suggest that the Fed is nearing its goal of maximum employment.

With inflation at a three-decade high and far above the Fed’s 2% annual target, reaching its employment mandate would heighten pressure on Chair Jerome Powell to raise interest rates sooner rather than later. Doing so would make loans more expensive for many individuals and businesses.

President Joe Biden on Friday highlighted the drop in the unemployment rate, which he called “an extraordinary bit of progress.” Still, the slowdown in job growth, if it persists, will pose a challenge for Biden, who has received poor marks in a handful of public opinion polls for how he has handled the economy.

Though most indicators show the economy remains on the rebound, White House aides have privately expressed frustration that the president hasn’t earned credit for the improvement and instead is facing criticism over the spike in inflation and gas prices that have burdened Americans in recent months.

The government's survey of businesses suggested that some employers were more cautious about hiring last month. Restaurants, bars and hotels added just 23,000 jobs, down from 170,000 in October. That could reflect the effects of an uptick in COVID-19 cases last month and a reduction in outdoor dining.

Retailers cut 20,000 jobs, a sign that holiday hiring hasn't been as strong as in previous years. But transportation and warehousing firms added 50,000 positions, which indicates that online retailers and shippers anticipate healthy online shopping.

Jeff Crivello, CEO of BBQ Holdings, which owns about 300 restaurants, said that for him, hiring has become a little easier in recent months. None of his restaurants are now closing early because of staff shortages. But it's still a struggle. The company hired more than 300 people in November yet still has about 500 open jobs.

“The pandemic," Crivello said, “ushered in a seismic shift in consumer behavior and demand and the desires of the workforce.”

His company has raised average hourly pay 15% since the pandemic struck but is competing with the new opportunities that many restaurant workers have, including higher-paying jobs at warehouses or in trucking. Many younger workers, Crivello said, are finding jobs in the cannabis industry or in gaming or even making money building followings on social media.

The jobs outlook for the coming months has become hazier with the emergence of the omicron variant. Little is definitively known about omicron, and widespread business shutdowns are considered unlikely. Still, omicron could discourage some Americans from traveling, shopping and eating out in the coming months and potentially slow the economy.

Fostoria Review Times
Published 20 hours ago