The following news articles appeared on news media websites across Ohio today. Appearance on this website does not indicate endorsement by OSBA of any editorial or news item. OSBA does not filter the news, but simply posts educational news sent to us by pressrelations.com. To go directly to a specific category, click on the “Category” box, below.

Fund local, community journalism

A portion of the Local Journalism Sustainability Act (LJSA) was included in the recent Build Back Better bill that was passed in the House.

The LJSA, which has bipartisan support in the House, provides needed support for local journalists across the U.S. and is now being considered in the Senate.

While there has been tremendous support for the LJSA overall, there have been some pundits who have questioned whether government support for local journalists will maintain a free press. One such claim recently came from The Wall Street Journal in an opinion piece asserting the LJSA is “a subsidy for local journalists, most of whom are left of center.”

It’s important for local newspaper readers to understand this claim is not only misleading but is also incorrect. While the writers at The Wall Street Journal or The New York Times may be interested in demonstrating how right or left of center they are, most journalists at local newspapers are dedicated to the news of their community without a slant in either direction.

One of the reasons the LJSA has gained so much support is the focus on protecting local journalism. The LJSA is designed to help local journalists in local communities and not the national media. Outlets such as The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Huffington Post, CNN, Fox and others won’t qualify for support as they have too many employees or don’t produce local news. The creation and consumption of local news is different than national news, and according to a 2019 Knight-Gallup study, more people believe their local news organizations are accomplishing most of the key tasks of informing their communities, significantly higher than national outlets. Without a local news organization, where else can a community get information about their local school board, the mayor’s race and other important components of community life?

The LJSA also provides even the smallest newspapers with a bridge to continue their digital evolution. Most local newspapers receive no compensation from Big Tech companies such as Facebook or Google for use of their content. While The Wall Street Journal may be able to negotiate a deal with Google to be paid for use of its content, most small newspapers don’t have that option, and they are challenged to find the resources to provide the news that is critically needed by their communities. This additional resource will provide the local news industry time to continue its transition to a more digital future and to work out a better arrangement either through legislation or other means to be paid when Google and Facebook use their content.

The LJSA is also not a permanent handout for the industry. It’s a tax credit that sunsets in five years and is structured to incentivize all local news organizations to retain and even hire more journalists to cover their communities. While some hedge-fund owned newspaper companies and other major corporations will benefit from the tax credits, the real winners will be the communities they serve. For the thousands of small independently-owned newspapers across the U.S., particularly in rural communities without other viable news sources, the LJSA will mean that they have a much better chance of staying afloat.

We strongly encourage the Senate to support the elements of the LJSA in the Build Back Better bill. We are appreciative of Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., and the many co-sponsors of this bill who understand how important it is for all communities to have a strong local news voice; when it is lost, everyone loses.

And that has no slant to the right or to the left.

On behalf of its approximately 1,600 newspaper and associate member companies, America’s Newspapers is committed to explaining, defending and advancing the vital role of newspapers in democracy and civil life. We put an emphasis on educating the public on all the ways newspapers contribute to building a community identity and the success of local businesses.

Learn more at www.newspapers.org.

Ironton Tribune
Published 20 hours ago

H.S. Results 12/2-12/3

PREP RESULTS

ST. EDWARD 23, SPRINGFIELD 13

SE 7 9 7 0 - 23

Sp 0 7 0 6 – 13

First Quarter

SE: Enovitch 17 run (kick).

Second Quarter

Sp: Safety.

SE: Goodall 19 pass from Ramos (kick).

Sp: Smoot 9 run (Yost kick).

Third Quarter

SE: Enovitch 9 run (kick).

Fourth Quarter

Sp: Brown 20 pass from Smoot (kick fail).

Division III

CHARDON 21, BADIN 14

C 7 0 7 7 – 21

B 0 7 7 0 – 14

First Quarter

C: Sulka 36 pass from Henry (Tager kick).

Second Quarter

B: Walsh 3 run (Niesen kick).

Third Quarter

C: Bruce 27 run (Tager kick).

B: Russo 6 run (Niesen kick).

Fourth Quarter

C: Carr 2 run (Tager kick).

Division IV

CLINTON-MASSIE 29, URSULINE 28

U 0 21 7 0 – 28

CM 7 0 7 15 – 29

First Quarter

CM: VanHoose 2 run (McGuinness kick).

Second Quarter

U: McElroy 34 run (Smith kick).

U: McElroy 1 run (Donlow run).

U: Irving 39 pass from Shannon (pass fail).

Third Quarter

U: Boyd 26 pass from Shannon (Smith kick).

CM: Zantene 49 run (McGuinness kick).

Fourth Quarter

CM: Vance 1 run (McGuinness kick).

CM: Zantene 1 run (VanHoose run).

Thursday’s Final

Division II

WINTON WOODS 21, AKRON HOBAN 10

AH 0 3 7 0 – 10

WW 0 14 7 0 – 21

Second Quarter

AH: Durkin 20 FG.

WW: Ellery 4 run (Dombele kick).

WW: Spikes 2 run (Dombele kick).

Third Quarter

AH: Kepler 22 fumble return (Durkin kick).

WW: Spears 53 run (Dombele kick).

Boys Basketball

Friday’s Results

Alter 58, Moeller 51: Mahaffey (M) 24, Mukes (M) 14, Conner (A) 20, Ruffolo (A) 13, Chew (A) 11.

Bellbrook 69, Eaton 49: Driskell (B) 18, Fugate (B) 13, Pavlak (B) 11.

Bradford 59, National Trail 46

Butler 42, Stebbins 40

Catholic Central 65, Cedarville 50

Cin. Country Day 57, Cin. Christian 43: Parnell (CC) 17, Rogers (CC) 12.

Dixie 59, Ansonia 50

Dunbar 74, Belmont 43: Allen (D) 20, Martin (D) 11, Hatcher (D) 10.

Elder 56, Fenwick 37

Emmanuel Christian 61, Miami Valley 21: Channels (EC) 19, Lawrence (EC) 13.

Fairfield 68, Colerain 20: Crim (F) 17, Tolbert (F) 13.

Greeneview 50, Greenon 44: Minteer (Gn) 17, Journell (Gn) 11, Williams (Gv) 12, Erisman (Gv) 12, Caudell (Gv) 12.

Greenville 55, Fairborn 42: Williams (F) 15, Bush (F) 12.

Indian Hill 56, Northwest 46

Indian Lake 67, Northwestern 48

Lakota East 84, Hamilton 70: Matthews (H) 28, Givens (H) 21, Coles (LE) 21, Kronauge (LE) 18, Peck (LE) 18.

Lakota West 71, Mason 50: Morton (M) 14, Middleton (M) 11, Layfield (LW) 18, Dudukovich (LW) 16, Lavender (LW) 15.

Meadowdale 56, Thurgood Marshall 43

Mechanicsburg 49, Triad 47

Milton-Union 47, Lehman Catholic 25: Chapman (LC) 12, Brumbaugh (MU) 18.

Monroe 61, Valley View 52

North Union 49, Graham 48

Northridge 50, Miami East 48: Enis (ME) 16, Apple (ME) 10, Roeth (ME) 14, Davis (N) 17, Jacobs (N) 17.

Oakwood 68, Brookville 40

Ponitz 54, Stivers 42

Princeton 67, Oak Hills 52

Springboro 51, Beavercreek 45

Springfield Shawnee 63, Kenton Ridge 51

Sycamore 63, Middletown 50: Hall (S) 11, Bolden (S) 12, Southerland (S) 14, Hall (M) 23.

Tecumseh 57, Bellefontaine 42

Troy 66, West Carrollton 55

Troy Christian 57, Covington 35: Miller (C) 12, Penrod (TC) 14.

Twin Valley South 71, Newton 58: Peters (N) 19, Oburn (N) 13.

Urbana 63, Ben Logan 38: Rogan (U) 19, Dixon (U) 15, Donahoe (U) 10, Arn (BL) 10.

Wayne 59, Miamisburg 53

Waynesville 57, Carlisle 38: Mitchell (W) 16, Potter (W) 13.

Yellow Springs 55, Dayton Christian 50

Girls Basketball

Thursday’s Results

Arcanum 67, Preble Shawnee 43: Jewell (PS) 14.

Bethel 43, Covington 38: Harrington (C) 15, Moore (B) 19.

Bradford 35, National Trail 25: Miller (B) 14, Canan (B) 12.

Dixie 46, Ansonia 30

Legacy Christian 56, Jefferson 9

Mississinawa Valley 60, Franklin Monroe 34

Oakwood 45, Brookville 26

Tri-Village 74, Tri-County North 19

Waynesville 57, Eaton 50: VanSchaik (W) 19, Cassoni (W) 14, Whitaker (W) 10.

West Liberty-Salem 62, Triad 12

Boys Bowling

Friday’s Results

Dayton Christian 1755, Northeastern 1682: Bartley (DC) 305 series.

Thursday’s Results

Carroll 2657, Valley View 1595: Bui (C) 444 series, Brust (C) 422 series.

Greeneview 1793, Legacy Christian 1516: Brennaman (G) 450 series.

Greenville 1845, Trotwood 1388

Southeastern 1846, Dayton Christian 1600: Withers (DC) 309 series, Bartley (DC) 288 series.

Girls Bowling

Friday’s Results

Northeastern 1637, Dayton Christian 1200: Millar (DC) 230 series, Brown (DC) 214 series.

Thursday’s Results

Carroll 1879, Valley View 1520: Duff (VV) 311 series, Sharp (C) 322 series.

Greenville 1409, Trotwood 1234

Ross 1974, Carroll 1875: Carli (R) 323 series, Sharp (C) 331 series.

Southeastern 1329, Dayton Christian 1199: Millar (DC) 126 game.

Wrestling

Friday’s Results

Centerville 48, Lancaster 30

Thursday’s Results

Northmont 57, Oakwood 10

REPORTING RESULTS

Contact Dayton Daily News, Springfield News-Sun and Journal-News with scores and results as soon as possible after varsity high school athletic contests by email only at COPSports@coxinc.com. Please include any details from your contest that you would like published along with a contact name and phone number.

Springfield News Sun
Published 20 hours ago

Softball: Meyer returning to coach Patrick Henry

HAMLER — A familiar face to Patrick Henry softball will return to the dugout as Mike Meyer will return as head softball coach, per a press release from the Patrick Henry High School athletic department on Friday.

Meyer retired as head coach following a 12-year tenure from 2008-19, a stellar run marked by a 206-88 win-loss record, three district championships, six sectional championships and a Division III regional runner-up finish in his final season in 2019.

After Tracy Greene’s would-be first season in 2020 was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Patriots finished 3-13 in 2021 and 1-6 in Northwest Ohio Athletic League play.

“Coach Meyer’s coaching resume speaks for itself,” said PH athletic director Ben George of the new skipper, who coached eight all-Ohio players in his previous tenure at PH. “He previously built Patrick Henry softball into a well-respected program. He did a tremendous job growing the program from the youth all the way up to the varsity and I am confident that he will be able to do so again.”

Defiance Crescent News
Published 20 hours ago

Career Center hosting open house for students, adult ed

Submitted
Ag mechanics/power technologies instructor Kenny Carraway, right, speaks to a parent and prospective student about the Wayne County Schools Career Center at a previous open house. The career center’s high school and adult education open house will be held Dec. 9 from 5-7:30 p.m.

The Wayne County Schools Career Center will host an open house on Thursday, Dec. 9 from 5-7:30 p.m. The public is invited to attend with a special invitation extended to all Wayne County eighth-, ninth- and 10th-graders and their families. Juniors also are invited to tour the RAMTEC facility and learn about two half-day programs for seniors only: machining technologies and robotics and automation.

Students interested in engineering technologies should go to Orrville High School from 5-7:30 p.m.

The career center offers 27 high school programs in manufacturing, agriculture, healthcare, public service, technology, construction and mechanics.

Some college, university and career-technical school partners and military, business and industry representatives will be in the commons to answer questions about colleges and advanced training. Additional information about college credit, certification or licensure opportunities will be available from career-technical instructors. Student organizations will have displays describing their activities.

Academic teachers will provide information about a comprehensive offering of academics. Some academic courses offer college credit. Light refreshments will be available in the commons.

School counselors will host College Credit Plus Night at 6 p.m. in the Student Assistance Center and also will be available to answer questions about the application process. The Extra Help Area will be open with information related to the career center’s Extra Help programs.

Building tours will be led by staff guides, but maps will be available for those who want to tour on their own. There will be a drawing for prizes including wireless earbuds and gift cards for eighth-, ninth- and 10th-graders.

Adult education will hold an open house at the same time. Adults interested in full-time, part-time or Fast Track classes can tour classrooms and labs, discuss financial aid and grant options, and even attend an information session that evening. Staff also will be available to discuss the free Aspire classes and adult diploma programs.

The career center is located at 518 W. Prospect St. in Smithville. For more information call 330-669-7000 or go to the school website at www.wcscc.org.

Holmes County Bargain Hunter
Published 21 hours ago

H.S. Results 12/2-12/3

PREP RESULTS

ST. EDWARD 23, SPRINGFIELD 13

SE 7 9 7 0 - 23

Sp 0 7 0 6 – 13

First Quarter

SE: Enovitch 17 run (kick).

Second Quarter

Sp: Safety.

SE: Goodall 19 pass from Ramos (kick).

Sp: Smoot 9 run (Yost kick).

Third Quarter

SE: Enovitch 9 run (kick).

Fourth Quarter

Sp: Brown 20 pass from Smoot (kick fail).

Division III

CHARDON 21, BADIN 14

C 7 0 7 7 – 21

B 0 7 7 0 – 14

First Quarter

C: Sulka 36 pass from Henry (Tager kick).

Second Quarter

B: Walsh 3 run (Niesen kick).

Third Quarter

C: Bruce 27 run (Tager kick).

B: Russo 6 run (Niesen kick).

Fourth Quarter

C: Carr 2 run (Tager kick).

Division IV

CLINTON-MASSIE 29, URSULINE 28

U 0 21 7 0 – 28

CM 7 0 7 15 – 29

First Quarter

CM: VanHoose 2 run (McGuinness kick).

Second Quarter

U: McElroy 34 run (Smith kick).

U: McElroy 1 run (Donlow run).

U: Irving 39 pass from Shannon (pass fail).

Third Quarter

U: Boyd 26 pass from Shannon (Smith kick).

CM: Zantene 49 run (McGuinness kick).

Fourth Quarter

CM: Vance 1 run (McGuinness kick).

CM: Zantene 1 run (VanHoose run).

Thursday’s Final

Division II

WINTON WOODS 21, AKRON HOBAN 10

AH 0 3 7 0 – 10

WW 0 14 7 0 – 21

Second Quarter

AH: Durkin 20 FG.

WW: Ellery 4 run (Dombele kick).

WW: Spikes 2 run (Dombele kick).

Third Quarter

AH: Kepler 22 fumble return (Durkin kick).

WW: Spears 53 run (Dombele kick).

Boys Basketball

Friday’s Results

Alter 58, Moeller 51: Mahaffey (M) 24, Mukes (M) 14, Conner (A) 20, Ruffolo (A) 13, Chew (A) 11.

Bellbrook 69, Eaton 49: Driskell (B) 18, Fugate (B) 13, Pavlak (B) 11.

Bradford 59, National Trail 46

Butler 42, Stebbins 40

Catholic Central 65, Cedarville 50

Cin. Country Day 57, Cin. Christian 43: Parnell (CC) 17, Rogers (CC) 12.

Dixie 59, Ansonia 50

Dunbar 74, Belmont 43: Allen (D) 20, Martin (D) 11, Hatcher (D) 10.

Elder 56, Fenwick 37

Emmanuel Christian 61, Miami Valley 21: Channels (EC) 19, Lawrence (EC) 13.

Fairfield 68, Colerain 20: Crim (F) 17, Tolbert (F) 13.

Greeneview 50, Greenon 44: Minteer (Gn) 17, Journell (Gn) 11, Williams (Gv) 12, Erisman (Gv) 12, Caudell (Gv) 12.

Greenville 55, Fairborn 42: Williams (F) 15, Bush (F) 12.

Indian Hill 56, Northwest 46

Indian Lake 67, Northwestern 48

Lakota East 84, Hamilton 70: Matthews (H) 28, Givens (H) 21, Coles (LE) 21, Kronauge (LE) 18, Peck (LE) 18.

Lakota West 71, Mason 50: Morton (M) 14, Middleton (M) 11, Layfield (LW) 18, Dudukovich (LW) 16, Lavender (LW) 15.

Meadowdale 56, Thurgood Marshall 43

Mechanicsburg 49, Triad 47

Milton-Union 47, Lehman Catholic 25: Chapman (LC) 12, Brumbaugh (MU) 18.

Monroe 61, Valley View 52

North Union 49, Graham 48

Northridge 50, Miami East 48: Enis (ME) 16, Apple (ME) 10, Roeth (ME) 14, Davis (N) 17, Jacobs (N) 17.

Oakwood 68, Brookville 40

Ponitz 54, Stivers 42

Princeton 67, Oak Hills 52

Springboro 51, Beavercreek 45

Springfield Shawnee 63, Kenton Ridge 51

Sycamore 63, Middletown 50: Hall (S) 11, Bolden (S) 12, Southerland (S) 14, Hall (M) 23.

Tecumseh 57, Bellefontaine 42

Troy 66, West Carrollton 55

Troy Christian 57, Covington 35: Miller (C) 12, Penrod (TC) 14.

Twin Valley South 71, Newton 58: Peters (N) 19, Oburn (N) 13.

Urbana 63, Ben Logan 38: Rogan (U) 19, Dixon (U) 15, Donahoe (U) 10, Arn (BL) 10.

Wayne 59, Miamisburg 53

Waynesville 57, Carlisle 38: Mitchell (W) 16, Potter (W) 13.

Yellow Springs 55, Dayton Christian 50

Girls Basketball

Thursday’s Results

Arcanum 67, Preble Shawnee 43: Jewell (PS) 14.

Bethel 43, Covington 38: Harrington (C) 15, Moore (B) 19.

Bradford 35, National Trail 25: Miller (B) 14, Canan (B) 12.

Dixie 46, Ansonia 30

Legacy Christian 56, Jefferson 9

Mississinawa Valley 60, Franklin Monroe 34

Oakwood 45, Brookville 26

Tri-Village 74, Tri-County North 19

Waynesville 57, Eaton 50: VanSchaik (W) 19, Cassoni (W) 14, Whitaker (W) 10.

West Liberty-Salem 62, Triad 12

Boys Bowling

Friday’s Results

Dayton Christian 1755, Northeastern 1682: Bartley (DC) 305 series.

Thursday’s Results

Carroll 2657, Valley View 1595: Bui (C) 444 series, Brust (C) 422 series.

Greeneview 1793, Legacy Christian 1516: Brennaman (G) 450 series.

Greenville 1845, Trotwood 1388

Southeastern 1846, Dayton Christian 1600: Withers (DC) 309 series, Bartley (DC) 288 series.

Girls Bowling

Friday’s Results

Northeastern 1637, Dayton Christian 1200: Millar (DC) 230 series, Brown (DC) 214 series.

Thursday’s Results

Carroll 1879, Valley View 1520: Duff (VV) 311 series, Sharp (C) 322 series.

Greenville 1409, Trotwood 1234

Ross 1974, Carroll 1875: Carli (R) 323 series, Sharp (C) 331 series.

Southeastern 1329, Dayton Christian 1199: Millar (DC) 126 game.

Wrestling

Friday’s Results

Centerville 48, Lancaster 30

Thursday’s Results

Northmont 57, Oakwood 10

REPORTING RESULTS

Contact Dayton Daily News, Springfield News-Sun and Journal-News with scores and results as soon as possible after varsity high school athletic contests by email only at COPSports@coxinc.com. Please include any details from your contest that you would like published along with a contact name and phone number.

Journal-News.com
Published 21 hours ago

COVID-19 Transmission High In Lorain County + Fentanyl Pills

The quickest way to get caught up on the most important things happening today in Avon-Avon Lake.

Posted Sat, Dec 4, 2021 at 1:02 am ET

Reply

Hey, neighbors! Let's see what's happening in Avon and Avon Lake on this fine Saturday.

First, today's weather:

Variable cloudiness. High: 42 Low: 30.

Find out what's happening in Avon-Avon Lake with free, real-time updates from Patch.

Here are the top stories in Avon-Avon Lake today:

On Friday morning, the Ohio Narcotics Intelligence Center (ONIC) released its own safety bulletin warning Ohioans that counterfeit prescription tablets — made to look like Xanax and Oxycontin — are being sold around the Buckeye State. The pills instead have fentanyl inside.(Avon-Avon Lake Patch)

Lorain County has a "high" level of coronavirus transmission as of Dec. 3, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There were 446.4 new cases per 100,000 residents between Nov. 25 and Dec. 1. (Avon-Avon Lake Patch)

Today in Avon-Avon Lake:

Find out what's happening in Avon-Avon Lake with free, real-time updates from Patch.

EVR Shooting Basics (9:00 AM)

Sensory-Friendly Performance of The Nutcracker (2:00 PM)

Avon-Avon Lake Patch Notebook

Avon Lake Public Library: "The ALPL Children's Department is warming things up with some adorable new holiday and winter displays. Stop in for a peek while you check our the newest selection of books, movies, kits, and more!" (Facebook)

City of Avon Lake, OH: "It was Fine Bella and Marty's Cycle Center who pulled their Shop Local Raffle winners today. Madison at Fine Bella pulled Susan Brown's ticket, so Susan gets $50 at Fine Bella. And Marty himself pulled the ticket filled out at his shop b..." (Facebook)

Avon/Avon Lake Community Resource Services: "Erieview had a food drive to benefit our food pantry! They collected 3,440 pounds of food and Mr. Provenza's second grade class collected the most food so they got to silly string principal, Mrs. Isaly-Johns! 🤣🥰❤️" (Facebook)

Support Avon Schools: "Next week is #CSEdWeek! AELC, Avon East, & Avon Heritage K-5 students & families, we get to kick off the fun with virtual #FamilyCodeNight! Join us online Dec. 6 at 6 p.m. For more info, click link http://tinyurl.com/avonfamilycodenight" (Facebook)

From our sponsors — thanks for supporting local news!

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About me: Patch's Ohio Editor, casting my watchful gaze on Northeast Ohio. Feel free to drop me a line at chris.mosby@patch.com.

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COVID-19 Transmission High In Lorain County + Fentanyl Pills

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Avon Lake Patch.com
Published 21 hours ago

C-N Football Awards: Archbold duo, Edon's Ripke earn top honors

Edon receiver Gannon Ripke (left) is tackled by Norwalk St. Paul linebacker Quincey Crabbs during the first half of Saturday’s non-league game at Contractors Stadium in Norwalk.

Julie Baker/Photo courtesy Norwalk Reflector

Though their seasons came up short of the ultimate prize, Archbold and Edon saw some outstanding gridiron prowess during the 2021 season and both schools saw individuals rewarded for those efforts as part of The Crescent-News’ 2021 Football Awards.

Archbold senior quarterback DJ Newman put together his best career season in his final gridiron go-round to nab the 2021 Offensive Player of the Year Award while Bluestreak head coach David Dominique earned the C-N Coach of the Year Award for the third time in five years following Archbold’s 12-1 season that saw the Streaks win the outright Northwest Ohio Athletic League title and reach No. 1 in the state in Division VI.

Meanwhile, senior linebacker and first-year Bomber Gannon Ripke made an undeniable impact on Edon’s season en route to the Defensive Player of the Year Award, marking the second straight Bomber to do so after Jobe Carlson did so a season ago.

For Newman, the NWOAL’s Offensive Player of the Year and a first-team all-district QB, the hardware adds to a lofty list of accomplishments in Blue and Gold. The senior signal-caller completed 70.5 percent of his passes (148-of-210) for 2,159 yards, 29 touchdown passes and five interceptions while leading the Archbold rushing attack with 1,311 yards and 20 TDs on 143 attempts (9.2 yards per carry).

“He came in his sophomore year four games into the season and he’s never looked back,” said Dominique of the three-year starter. “He’s done an awesome job … You can add more and more with him and he just takes it on his back and thrives. The best part is, you get him off the field and he’s a great kid, a three-sport athlete. He’s a humble kid and he’s earned everything he’s gotten and he’s deserving of everything he’s gotten.”

Said Newman, who recently committed to play baseball at Division I Bowling Green: “I take it as a great honor coming from all the other coaches thinking of me as one of the best in the area. Coming into this year, we knew we lost a lot of valuable guys from last year and needed guys to step up. As a senior and a QB, I tried to get everyone on the team to believe we could do something special and we did that.”

Even Newman’s playoff output alone was impressive as the QB tallied 636 yards passing and 10 TDs with no interceptions in three playoff contests while rushing for 223 yards and three TDs as the Streaks dominated opponents for 12 straight weeks before a 38-35 upset loss to rival Liberty Center at the final whistle in the D-VI Region 22 semifinals.

Newman finished with 10 first-place votes among 24 ballots submitted from the C-N coverage area’s football coaches, giving him 121 points to finish ahead of second-place QB Drew Gallehue of Edon (325-of-478, 4,977 yards, 58 TDs, seven rushing TDs) with 77 points and Ripke (103 receptions, 1,809 yards, 21 TDs, 155 rush yards, five TDs, two return TDs) in third place with 44 points.

For Newman, the award throws him in the mix with former Archbold QBs Gabe Petersen (2017), Garrett Morton (2010) and Ken Morton (1980) as Streak signal-callers to win the Offensive Player of the Year Award. An even more exclusive club is the group of athletes to hold Player of the Year status in multiple sports at the same time.

As the 2021 baseball Player of the Year, Newman joines Fairview’s Ryan Radcliff (2007 football, 2008 baseball), Liberty Center’s Blake Lingruen (1999 football, 2000 wrestling), Tinora’s Kevin McCann (2003 football, 2004 track), Bryan’s Joe Roebuck (1986 football, 1987 baseball) and Paulding’s Jim Caserta (1975 football, 1975-76 baseball) as boys athletes to do so, along with Swanton’s Abby LaVigne (2006 volleyball, 2007 girls basketball) and LC’s Denise Matheny (2004 volleyball, 2005 track).

“There’s been a lot of hard work, it’s a constant grind,” said Newman of his success over multiple sports and seasons. “Overall it’s helped me compete harder and raise my level of competitiveness no matter what the sport.”

Lauded Dominique: “His very first start against PH (in 2019), it was a tough spot. They were the favorites to win the league, they went on to the state semifinals and he played lights out. We knew he could be good at that time but when he made the plays he did that night, we knew we made the right decision.”

On the defensive side, Ripke backed up his offensive outburst in his first season at Edon with an equally outstanding effort on the defensive side. The Bomber linebacker rolled up 150 tackles, eight tackles for loss, four sacks, two interceptions, three pass break-ups and a defensive touchdown as Edon put together a historic season under coach Bob Olwin.

Even with COVID-19 protocols changing two different regular-season matchups inot tough tests against Whiteford (Mich.) and Norwalk St. Paul, Edon set a new bar with a 9-1 regular season, its first ever TAAC championship and a pair of playoff victories before falling to Lima Central Catholic in the third round of the postseason.

“It’s a huge accomplishment. I couldn’t do it without my teammates and my coaches ad everybody that’s been around me along the way,” said Ripke, who was a solid player for three years at Edgerton before transferring to Edon this season as his father Matt was hired as Edon athletic director and boys basketball coach. “Over the summer everybody was welcoming to me, I couldn’t ask for better teammates. Whether it was coaches or friends or teammates, there was always help for me along the way.”

Ripke had a career-best 20 tackles in the 45-44 loss to Norwalk St. Paul while catching 14 passes for 205 yards on offense before topping that total the next week with 21 takedowns against Whiteford and 21 again in the first round of the playoffs against Spencerville.

Ripke picked up six first-place votes and out-pointed runner-up Cy Rump of D-V state semifinalist Ottawa-Glandorf by a 75-61 margin while Napoleon’s Tanner Rubinstein and Wauseon’s Jonas Tester tied for third with 26 points.

Finally, Archbold coach David Dominique picked up his third C-N Coach of the Year Award (2017, 2019) as the Bluestreaks made yet another playoff run in 2021. Archbold’s run was one of dominance as the Streaks did not allow more than 15 points in any game before the loss to Liberty Center and outscored opponents 500-81 in those 12 games, including a 302-24 margin in an unbeaten run to the league title, the program’s third straight.

The Streaks reached No. 1 in the Associated Press Division VI state poll and won multiple playoff games for the third consecutive season, made all the more impressive by the fact that the program lost over half their starting offensive and defensive lineups via graduation from the 2020 campaign.

“If you would’ve told me before the season things would go the way they did, I’d have been a little suspicious,” said Dominique. “But when we first got them the first week of July, I knew something was special. These kids were going to compete and competition breeds success.

“I’ve been fortunate to coach with a lot of the same coaches the entire way and … players like DJ and these guys, they make a coach like me look pretty good.”

As a three-time winner, Dominique joins former Archbold legend John Downey (1982, 1988, 1990), Liberty Center’s Rex Lingruen (1992, 2000-01, 2011), Defiance’s Jerry Buti (1991, 1994, 1997), Ayersville’s Craig McCord (1985-86, 1989), Swanton’s Dave Hansbarger (1975, 1981, 1995) and Wauseon’s Larry Fruth (1974, 1978-79) as coaches to achieve the feat.

Dominique picked up 10 first-place votes and 132 points to finish ahead of Olwin (63 points, three first-place votes) and Antwerp’s Jason Hale (58, three) in the voting.

Defiance Crescent News
Published 21 hours ago

Napoleon council agenda

Napoleon City Council will consider 13 legislative items during its meeting at 7 p.m. Monday in the municipal building, 255 W. Riverview Ave.

Scheduled for first readings are resolutions allowing an agreement with the Regional Income Tax Agency for tax collections and authorizing a real estate purchase agreement with the Cultural Center of Henry County, the Napoleon City Schools Board of Education and Carol Morley Beck.

Set for second readings:

• a resolution amending the city’s yearly reoccurring cost legislation.

• an ordinance establishing a water rate review commission.

• a resolution allowing the expenditure of more than $25,000 as it relates to reoccurring costs with operations and expenses.

• a resolution authorizing the expenditure of funds and allowing a department director to take bids on certain projects in 2022.

• an ordinance establishing a new position classification pay plan for city employees in 2022.

• an ordinance establishing the 2022 appropriation measure (budget) for the city.

• a resolution authorizing fund balance transfers as needed in 2022.

• an ordinance amending the allocation of funds in Secs. 193.11 and 194.013 of the city code.

• a resolution allowing a contribution to the Henry County Community Improvement Corporation in 2022.

• an ordinance apportioning expenses incurred for the mayor council and various departments in 2022.

Council also will consider the third reading of a resolution extending provisions contained in ordinance number 021-18 concerning the temporary elimination of certain residential building permit fees.

Defiance Crescent News
Published 21 hours ago

Toledo Symphony String Orchestra to perform at Napoleon's St. Paul's Lutheran Church

NAPOLEON — The Toledo Symphony String Orchestra will present a Christmas concert at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Napoleon Township, Dec. 15 at 7:30 p.m. The church is located at 16976 County Road Q1 in Napoleon.

This will be the 10th year that St. Paul’s has hosted the orchestra in its sanctuary. There was no concert in 2020 due to the pandemic. This year for safety reasons, the symphony has decided to bring only the string section of approximately 18 musicians.

The concert was started in order to provide a service to the community and bring the orchestra closer to home for area residents. The Toledo Symphony Orchestra (TSO) is a community-supported organization of professional musicians and teachers who deliver quality performance and music education for all.

Ticket prices are $20 for adults and $10 for students in grades K-12, with children four and younger free. Call 419-758-3522 for ticket reservations or for more information.

Formed in 1943 as The Friends of Music and incorporated in 1951 as the Toledo Orchestra Association, Inc., the TSO has grown from a core group of 22 part-time musicians to a regional orchestra that employs 69 professional musicians who consider TSO their primary employer, as well as numerous extra players annually as repertoire demands.

On Jan. 1, 2019, the Toledo Symphony and Toledo Ballet officially merged to form the Toledo Alliance for the Performing Arts (TAPA), a new non-profit organization dedicated to providing exceptional live music and dance performances and education for the region. This partnership promises to create new and invigorating programs, provide cost and revenue synergies in operations and integrate the arts through shared educational missions.

The Toledo Symphony, reaches more than 260,000 individuals annually through performances and education programs. The series concerts (Masterworks, Pops, Chamber, Mozart in the Afternoon and Family Series) are the critical underpinning of the orchestra’s artistic mission and regularly draw people from 135 postal zip codes.

Education programs, student performances, and community concerts are held in schools, neighborhood churches, performing arts centers and community facilities throughout the region.

Conducting this year’s event will be Vince Lee.

With a Carnegie Hall debut described as “powerful” and “hefty” by the New York Times, Lee is quickly rising as one of today’s top emerging talents. Known among his contemporaries for his dynamic performances and his razor-sharp ear, Lee’s diverse musical background provides him a flexibility and perspective that is unique in the conducting world.

His firm belief in striving for the highest artistic standards, regardless of genre, venue, or audience, has made him a crowd favorite, and a popular hire for numerous orchestras and arts organizations throughout the country. Recent highlights include appearances with the Florida Orchestra, the Illinois Symphony, the Toledo Symphony and the Korean Symphony Orchestra in Seoul, South Korea.

During his tenure with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra (CSO), Lee revolutionized his role as assistant conductor. His symphonic concerts with the CSO received critical acclaim, and his Young People’s Concerts found unprecedented levels of success, combining elements of increased interactivity with high artistic standards.

This tradition has continued in his activities as a guest conductor, designing and conducting innovative and engaging concerts for thousands of concertgoers.

With over 200 premieres to his credit, Lee has become one of the most sought-after conductors of modern compositions. Lauded in reviews for his “striking attention to detail,” and “energetic, breathtaking performance,” he has established a reputation among composers for bringing particularly challenging music to life.

Lee is also an enthusiastic believer in paying his experiences forward to the next generation of musicians, and regularly appears as a guest at schools, universities, and workshops across the U.S.

Lee made his professional conducting debut at age 13 with the CSO, under the tutelage of Erich Kunzel. His conducting studies took him to Indiana University before being invited to study at the Juilliard School by Maestro James DePreist. After receiving his post-graduate diploma from Juilliard, Lee’s career came full circle when he won his first major conducting position with the CSO.

Defiance Crescent News
Published 21 hours ago

Dream Center hosts workforce graduation

Close

A workforce graduation ceremony was held Thursday at the Defiance Dream Center for young adults and high school students who earned certifications in construction and automotive program. The graduates include, front row, from left: Isiah Williams and Tino Montez. Back row, from left: Nate Vogelsong, Wyatt George, Timothy Behm, Luke Lechuga and Kahlil Granger.

Tim McDonough/C-N Photo

A workforce graduation ceremony was held Thursday at the Defiance Dream Center for young adults and high school students who earned certifications in construction and automotive program. The graduates include, front row, from left: Isiah Williams and Tino Montez. Back row, from left: Nate Vogelsong, Wyatt George, Timothy Behm, Luke Lechuga and Kahlil Granger.

A workforce graduation ceremony was held Thursday at the Defiance Dream Center for young adults and high school students who earned certifications in construction and automotive program. The graduates include, front row, from left: Isiah Williams and Tino Montez. Back row, from left: Nate Vogelsong, Wyatt George, Timothy Behm, Luke Lechuga and Kahlil Granger.

Tim McDonough/C-N Photo

A workforce graduation ceremony was held Thursday at the Defiance Dream Center for young adults and high school students who earned certifications in construction and automotive program. The graduates include, front row, from left: Isiah Williams and Tino Montez. Back row, from left: Nate Vogelsong, Wyatt George, Timothy Behm, Luke Lechuga and Kahlil Granger.

The Defiance Dream Center (DDC) hosted its 2021 Fall Workforce Graduation ceremony Thursday, for young adults and high school students who recently completed training and certificate programs.

The training, which took place at the Dream Center located at 1935 E. Second St. Suite A, was provided through partnerships with the DDC, Northwest State Community College (NSCC), Ohio Means Jobs-Defiance and Paulding counties (OMJ) and Defiance High School (DHS).

In attendance to honor the graduates were Defiance Mayor Mike McCann, and representatives from business, entities and partners involved with the DDC.

A trio of young adults, and a quartet of high school students, graduated from their respective programs.

Those graduates include:

• Wyatt George and Nate Vogelsong, Young Adult Basic Construction Skills Certificate of Completion Program.

• Austino Montez, Young Adult Basic Automotive Certificate of Completion Program.

• Luke Lechuga, Isiah Williams, Kahil Granger and Timothy Behm, High School Basic Construction Skills Certificate of Completion and Lean Yellow Belt Program.

In addition to earning workforce skills, the graduates also learned life skills as well as employability skills through its Wildfire Leadership program.

“These programs not only taught these students skills to help them transition into the workforce, but it gave them a greater understanding of who they are and why their life matters,” stated Stephanie Lammers of the DDC, who kicked off the program. She went on to share this quote attributed to Mark Twain: ‘The two most important days in your life are the day you are born, and the day you find out why.’”

Bill Lammers, CEO of the DCC, followed by sharing the core values of the workforce development program with all in attendance before thanking all the partners who are involved in the program.

“So many times it’s easy for us to pick apart people’s lives, but what you are going to see today are steps of growth and transformation,” said Bill. “Seeing that growth and transformation is our heart. We thank you so much for being a part of today, and these programs.”

Bob Morton, superintendent of Defiance City Schools, and Jay Jerger, principal of Defiance High School, were in attendance to honor the graduates, as well as thank the partners who have developed and instituted the workforce development programs.

Jim Drewes of NSCC, and Tiffanny Dargenson and Adreana Lopez of Ohio Means Jobs, each shared about their organization’s role in workforce development programs, before Dargenson and Lopez handed out the certificates to the graduates, with the help of Drewes and the workforce instructors on hand.

Workforce instructors from NSCC include: Rusty Bush and Luke Baker, construction; Tom Layne, automotive; Matt Kibler, Lean Yellow Belt training; as well as Joe and Dez Silva, who led the Wildfire Leadership program.

The Silvas, then spoke about the Wildfire Leadership program, telling the crowd that they “went deep” with the students to find out their stories, their setbacks, and to “be real” with them about becoming leaders and taking charge of their futures.

“Our heart is to come along side these men and become leaders,” said Joe. “There are two pillars of what Wildfire Leadership is built around, the first one is uncovering your purpose, which starts out by learning their stories, and finding out what life had handed these young men. Once we talked with and dealt with what they’ve gone through in their lives, it helped unleash so many opportunities for these young men.

“We believe in Wildfire Leadership, you have to unpack your pain before you can find out your purpose,” continued Joe. “The second pillar is to unleash their potential by asking questions like, ‘What major impact do you want to leave on this world?’ We were blown away by their responses, which led to the students putting together their mission portrait, which show them how their purpose can impact others and the world around them.”

Dez proceeded to bring each student up to talk about their mission portrait, with Dez picking out a trait about each of the students for them to talk about. The students spoke about being leaders, making a difference, overcoming obstacles and helping others who have gone through similar situations.

Dez also shared that several of the students who graduated on Thursday, have been hired in construction, automotive and other positions in Defiance.

“The most important thing on my mission portrait is to overcome my problems and control my reactions,” said Granger when it was his time to speak. “I’ve made bad decisions in life, and I’ve reacted badly to situations, so my focus is to overcome those problems.”

Bill Lammers closed the program by sharing the Dream Center has started a three-year fundraising sustainability and growth campaign, to raise $1.719 million to relocate the Dream Center from its current location, to the former ServiceMaster building in the Ranchland Plaza south of Defiance High School.

Defiance Crescent News
Published 21 hours ago

Wayne Trace's defense too much for Bryan boys basketball

By MICHAEL BURWELL sportseditor@bryantimes.com

Dec 4, 2021

36 min ago

Bryan’s Jase Kepler (middle) corrals a loose ball between Wayne Trace’s Trevor Sinn (left) and Brooks Laukhuf during Friday’s boys basketball game at Wayne Trace High School.

Photo by Michael Burwell

Bryan's Evan Cox (left) puts up a shot as Wayne Trace's Brooks Laukhuf (middle) and Cameron Graham defend during Friday's boys basketball game at Wayne Trace High School.

Photo by Michael Burwell

HAVILAND — Wayne Trace’s defensive pressure all over the court wreaked havoc on Bryan during Friday night’s boys basketball game.

The Raiders forced 25 turnovers and converted most of them into points as Wayne Trace knocked off Bryan 64-29 at Wayne Trace High School.

“We’ve got to take care of the ball,” Bryan coach Brock Homier said. “That was our No. 1 issue tonight, we just didn’t take care of the ball well enough. Their press definitely hurt us, we’ve got to get back to work and work on ball security.”

Wayne Trace, which has won 17 or more games each of the last nine seasons, improved to 3-0. Bryan slipped to 0-2.

The Raiders jumped out to a 13-6 lead in the first quarter and used a 21-6 advantage in the second frame to take a 34-12 halftime lead. Wayne Trace forced 11 turnovers in the second quarter.

Sophomore Kyle Stoller had game highs of 18 points and eight rebounds to power Wayne Trace, while classmate Brooks Laukhuf chipped in 16 points and four boards. Cameron Graham added 13 points and four rebounds, and Tyler Davis snatched seven boards.

Senior Craig Jackson fronted Bryan with 10 points and four rebounds. Evan Cox added six points; Sam Herold had four points and five rebounds; and Maddox Langenderfer also had four points.

Bryan’s defensive pressure played well at times, especially in the third quarter when the Golden Bears went on an 8-0 run to pull with 34-20 with 2:06 left. Herold had a bucket; Jackson knocked down a short jumper and had a layup off Jase Kepler’s steal; and Ayden Pelz scored in transition during the run before Wayne Trace’s first points came via a Stoller free throw with 1:50 left.

“We’re putting one quarter together and taking one off. We’ve got to put all four together and when we do, I think we can make some noise,” Homier said. “But right now, we’re only playing good for one quarter, playing hard for one quarter. We’ve got to do it for all four.”

Bryan shot 37 percent (14 of 38) from the floor, including 0 of 7 from 3-point range. The Golden Bears also shot just 17 percent (1 of 6) from the free-throw line.

Wayne Trace shot 45 percent (25 of 55) from the floor, including 37 percent (7 of 19) from beyond the arc, and made 88 percent (7 of 8) of its free throws. The Raiders had a 30-24 rebounding advantage.

“This team’s able to change defenses and find different ways to score off our defense,” Wayne Trace coach Jim Linder said. “That’s been one of our goals.

“Last year, I thought we had a good offensive year. We needed to really ramp our defense up and they’ve really worked hard on being able to do that, find different ways to score.”

Bryan will return to action at 2:30 p.m. today when it travels to Butler, Indiana to face Eastside High School.

Wayne Trace 64, Bryan 29

Bryan 6 6 8 9 — 29

Wayne Trace 13 21 3 27 — 64

Bryan: Herold 2 0 0-2 4, Cox 3 0 0-0 6, Jackson 5 0 0-0 10, Pelz 1 0 0-0 2, Langenderfer 2 0 0-2 4, Shellenberger 1 0 0-0 2, Koenig 0 0 1-2 1. Totals: 14-31 0-7 1-6 29.

Wayne Trace: Laukhuf 5 2 0-0 16, T. Sinn 1 1 0-0 5, Graham 2 1 6-6 13, Stoller 7 1 1-2 18, C. Sinn 1 1 0-0 5, Myers 0 1 0-0 3, Hildebrand 1 0 0-0 2, Winans 1 0 0-0 2. Totals: 18-35 7-19 7-8 64.

Junior Varsity: Wayne Trace, 32-11.

Bryan Times Online
Published 21 hours ago

Rivalry week lives up to the hype

Dec 04, 2021 12:00 AM

The final week of the college football regular season is known as Rivalry Week as many contests feature the most important game of the year for schools against their most hated opponent. Whether the game has playoff implications or not, fans point to this game as the one that really matters.
So many great games took place last weekend including some where the emotions of fans went for a roller coaster ride. From two touchdowns in 26 seconds, a couple of muffed punts that led to touchdowns for both teams, and a four overtime thriller in the Iron Bowl – well, let’s just say it was a wild weekend.
I’m going to talk about five games, coaching moves (off the field not on it) and take a look at the college football playoffs. Are you ready for some football?
North Carolina State v. North Carolina. No shot at the playoffs in this game, but don’t think for a minute that the folks in Raleigh or Chapel Hill cared. This is for year-long bragging rights and this game was crazy.
When UNC kicked a 50-yard field goal and took a nine point lead with 2:12 remaining, it appeared the game was over. Not exactly. NC State got a 64-yard passing TD with 1:35 left and then recovered an onside kick. Another TD pass of 24 yards at the 1:09 mark and now the Wolfpack is up 34-30. But hold on there is over a minute left!
The Tar Heels get close enough to attempt a Hail Mary pass that falls harmlessly to the ground in the end zone. Fans can now breath again and have a whole year to retell what they saw that day.
Alabama v. Auburn. This version of the Iron Bowl was a defensive struggle and when Alabama, trailing 10-3, got the ball back with 1:35 left on their own three and no timeouts remaining it seemed over. But wait this is rivalry week!
The Crimson Tide goes the length of the field scoring a game tying TD and we’re going to overtime. The first OT saw both teams score TD’s. The second one ended with a pair of field goals. Now the new overtime rules (designed to end marathon OT games despite the Illinois – Penn State nine overtime game earlier this year) have each team attempting a 2-point conversion beginning in the third overtime period.
Both teams are successful in overtime 3, but only Alabama gets the conversion in the 4th OT and they remain very much alive for the playoffs.
Oregon v. Oregon State. My biggest takeaway from this game was the uniforms. Oregon, with Nike footing the bill, has the most creative unis in the country. This time they wore green – pants, jerseys and helmets. Oregon State responded with orange pants and orange jerseys, but at least their helmets were black. Colorful would be a nice adjective for this display, though cartoonish seems to work as well!
The game may well have playoff implications – at least in my proposal, so just hang on – and Oregon kept their chances alive by winning 38 – 29.
Oklahoma v. Oklahoma State. The Cowboys knocked off the Sooners in this version of Bedlam. Tied at halftime Oklahoma got a safety and a TD in the third quarter. State came back with two touchdowns in the fourth and another Hail Mary fell to the ground to end things. Oklahoma State moves on to the Big 12 championship game and (perhaps a shot at the playoffs), but the biggest news came after the game.
Apparently so upset at the loss Lincoln Riley decided to leave the land of Bud Wilkinson, Barry Switzer and Bob Stoops for the LaLa land of John McKay, John Robinson and Peter Carroll as he is going to take on a new challenge at USC.
Does anyone think that he would have a similar challenge if he stayed at Oklahoma which is moving to the SEC? The fact is he’s leaving and taking a touted quarterback recruit with him.
Ohio State v. Michigan. I’m assuming nearly everyone around here watched THE GAME. To me it turned on the first two series of the second half. The Buckeyes went three and out and Michigan went three and IN! Seriously, three running plays that accounted for 80 yards and a TD changed the complexion of this game.
Now I would suggest a couple of things. First of all, many fans want to blame somebody or something for the OSU loss. The weather, the play calling or the officiating are often culprits. I would proffer that you accept the fact that Michigan was the better team on this day. Many times the other team deserves praise for winning instead of finding an excuse for a team losing. And please don’t blame Ryan Day for the loss as it was his first in Big Ten Play after winning the previous 25 games.
Secondly I think a Michigan win is a good thing for the rivalry. If a team doesn’t ever win the Rivalry Week match up, then there really isn’t much of a rivalry is there?
The Playoffs. I’m writing this before the league championship games have been played and the four teams have yet to be chosen. With that in mind here are my thoughts. Georgia and Alabama are in no matter who wins that game. If Michigan and Cincinnati take care of business, they are also in. That being said, the idea of picking the four best teams for the playoffs is subjective at best. There is no perfect formula for doing so and every year a deserving team is left out.
Having said THAT… I would still like to see the playoffs expand, all well knowing that if you pick eight teams a ninth will be shunned. Go to 12 teams and there will be a 13th, 14th, or even 15th team that will feel slighted.
Just for fun though let’s pick an eight-team field for this year. Assuming the current top 4 make it, who would you pick up to get to that eight team mark? How about Oklahoma State (if they win the Big 12), Oregon (if they avenge their loss to Utah), Notre Dame (despite the fact that Brian Kelly is off to Baton Rouge) and Ohio State (they belong for losing to two playoff teams, or because they are still one of the best 8 teams in the country, take your pick).
Who gets left out in this format? Two loss teams such as Oklahoma and Ole Miss as well as a handful of others. Again there is no perfect way to pick the field, but more than four would make things a lot more interesting.
Finally one more interesting fact. If Michigan hadn’t lost a 16-point second half lead to Michigan State, they would be undefeated. Also if Alabama doesn’t pull out the Iron Bowl and loses to Georgia in the SEC title game, they would be a three loss team and a playoff afterthought.
Just saying...

Tiffin Advertiser Tribune
Published 21 hours ago

Roadrunners beat Zappe, Hilltoppers, 49-41, for C-USA title

Western Kentucky wide receiver Mitchell Tinsley (5) runs past UTSA cornerback Tariq Woolen (3) for a touchdown after making a catch during the second half of an NCAA college football game for the Conference USA championship Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in San Antonio. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — UTSA entered the season with a huge chip on its shoulder and the Roadrunners set it down Friday night to hoist the Conference USA trophy.

Sincere McCormick rushed for 204 yards and three touchdowns and the UTSA Roadrunners escaped another prolific outing by Western Kentucky quarterback Bailey Zappe to beat the Hilltoppers 49-41 and claim their first C-USA championship at the Alamodome.

“My fellas never disappoint,” UTSA coach Jeff Traylor said. “They didn’t disappoint tonight. We’re the champs. It’s freaking awesome.”

The Roadrunners continued a dream season by twice overcoming Zappe’s own dream season.

After escaping with a 52-46 victory over Western Kentucky on Oct. 9, UTSA had to sweat through the final seconds again.

Zappe completed 36 of 59 passes for 577 yards and four touchdowns. He set a single-season school record with 5,545 yards passing, surpassing Brandon Doughty.

“He’s a very special player,” Western Kentucky coach Tyson Helton said. “I think he’s the best quarterback in college football. I say that over and over again. He’s an outstanding player and he did all he could do tonight along with the rest of the football team.”

UTSA had its most inspiring victory less than a week after its most humiliating outing in a 45-23 loss to North Texas last week.

Leading 49-41 with a minute remaining, the Roadrunners stopped the Hilltoppers at their own 6-yard line when Jahmal Sam intercepted a desperation throw by Zappe as time expired.

Roadrunners quarterback Frank Harris responded to one of his worst outings last week by completing 19 of 28 passes for 218 yards and two touchdowns against the Hilltoppers.

The third largest crowd in school history at 41,148 watched anxiously as UTSA struggled to maintain an early lead.

The Roadrunners held the Hilltoppers’ prolific offense to 289 yards and a touchdown in the first half.

“In the first half, we just didn’t execute,” Zappe said. “If we played like we played in the second half, the first half would have been a different game, but as we all know, that didn’t happen. It boils down to execution. I think a lot of that comes onto me, I’ve got to be better.”

Zappe could not be contained in the second half, though.

“That’s a tough guy back there at quarterback," UTSA safety Antonio Parks said. "That’s an NFL talent back there that can sling the ball around. We knew all week we would just have to get our offense on the field as much as possible.”

Zappe completed 20 of 34 passes for 274 yards and three touchdowns in the second half. He has 56 touchdowns this season, moving within four of matching the single season record set by LSU’s Joe Burrow during the Tigers’ national championship season in 2019.

UTSA safety Rashad Wisdom was disqualified for targeting with 5:18 remaining the third quarter after hitting Malachi Corley near the sideline on an incomplete pass. Losing their leading tackler and vocal leader was difficult to overcome.

Zappe led Western Kentucky to 21 straight points after Wisdom’s ejection to cut UTSA’s lead to 42-34 with 11 minutes remaining in the game.

“It’s not over until the last second’s over and our guys all know,” Traylor said. “We told them we’re going to score, keep scoring.”

The Roadrunners responded with a 10-play, 75-yard drive capped by a 28-yard pass by Harris to De’Corian Clark in the back right corner of the end zone.

Zappe and Harris also exchanged scores to open the game.

Zappe tossed a 60-yard touchdown to Mitchell Tinsley 56 seconds into the game. Harris responded a little more than two minutes later with a 24-yard scoring run to cap a 75-yard drive.

The Roadrunners scored touchdowns on their first four possessions in building a 28-13 lead at the half.

“They were very unpredictable,” Hilltoppers safety Antwon Kincade said. “They gave us different kind of sets. We’ve seen it before, but they were in a whole lot of different variations out there in their formations. They came ready, they came with a plan.”

McCormick finished with 36 carries and had a rushing touchdown in each of the first three quarters, scoring from 2 yards, 65 yards and 17 yards.

___

More AP college football: https://apnews.com/hub/college-football and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25.

Sign up for the AP’s college football newsletter: https://apnews.com/cfbtop25

Englewood Independent
Published 21 hours ago

Calendar

SAT/12-4

Beloit

West Branch Class of 1970, breakfast, 10 a.m., Perkins

Boardman

DARE (Divorce/Death Aren’t Really the End), bowling at Boardman Lanes, 7 p.m.; information at 330-729-0127

Canfield

Angels for Animals Antiques, Collectibles & Christmas Sale, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Chester

Annual Christmas Parade, 3 p.m., downtown

Columbiana

Good As New Shop, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., First United Methodist Church; men’s and women’s clothing, 50% off Christmas items, 30% off boots, shoes and footwear

East Liverpool

East Liverpool High School Alumni Association Clock Tower Souvenir Store, open 3-5:30 p.m.

Annual Christmas Parade, hosted by East Liverpool Kiwanis, 6 p.m., downtown

East Liverpool High School Alumni Association Clock Tower Souvenir Store, open 3-5:30 p.m.

East Palestine

Gingerbread House Display and Contest, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., East Palestine Memorial Public Library; part of the Snowflake Festival

Rotary Club’s Breakfast with Santa, 9-11 a.m., community center

Ozer Ministries open house, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., 407 N. Market St.; raffles and gift bags for children

The Way Station/Kingdom Kloset, Presbyterian Church, 109 W. Rebecca St., 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Bingo, American Legion, 6 p.m., doors open 4:30 p.m.

Highlandtown

Community Breakfast, 8:30-10:30 a.m., Inverness Hall; by donation

Lisbon

Christmas activities: pancake and sausage breakfast, 9-11 a.m. at Italo’s, $7 adults and $5 children; children’s musical event, noon, crafts, 1 p.m., cookie decorating and cocoa bar, 3 p.m. at the chamber of commerce; Village Singers, 2 p.m. at the First Christian Church; Christmas story in the Gazebo at 4:45 p.m.; annual parade at 5 p.m., followed by lighting of the tree; Stage Left Players’ “It’s Christmas, Carol” at 7:30 p.m.

Drive-in Christmas Caroling at the Historic Williamsport Chapel, 12834 Leslie Road, 7 p.m.

Village Singers, “It’s Christmas” Christmas Concert, 2 p.m., First Christian Church; donations only; cookies served during intermission

Lepper Library monthly Writer’s Group, 2-3 p.m. Join leader, Meredith Deichler and fellow writers in discussions about writing, publishing, grammar and everything else in between.

Minerva

Jigsaw Puzzle Exchange, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Minerva Public Library; information at 330-868-4101

New Waterford

Eagles Band night with the Dudes, 9 p.m.-12:30 a.m., open to the public

Salem

Salem Hunting Club all you can eat breakfast, 7-11 a.m.; $5 donation includes eggs, pancakes, potatoes, sausage, toast coffee/tea and orange juice. Carryout orders at 234-567-4693 after 6:15 a.m. Open to the public

Salem Class of 1971, breakfast, Old Town Country Grill, Leetonia, 9 a.m.

Stuff A Cruiser, 2-5 p.m., Salem Walmart, sponsored by Salem Police, Ohio CAN Columbiana County, Nina’s Closet, Quaker FOP Lodge 88, Columbiana County Sheriff’s Office, Columbiana Police, special guest K-9s Simon, Jax, Csuti, Argo and Hunter, donations of new toys and clothing to help families in need.

Eagles, Christmas Auction, 5 p.m., kitchen 4 p.m., simply the deal

Visit the Burchfield Homestead, 867 E. 4th St. 1-5 p.m. Each room has at least one festive tree decorated with the inspiration of a Burchfield painting. Admission is $3. More info at 330 717-0092

Wellsville

Wellsville Stitchers (a crochet and knitting group), 1:30-3 p.m. at the Wellsville Library on Main Street (downstairs in the activity room). Free lessons. All skill levels welcome.

WHS 1967, 2 p.m., Riverside Roadhouse; spouses and friends welcome; bring donation for non-profit group in village

Class of 1958, Christmas party, 6 p.m., Alumni Center; RSVP at 330-303-3640 or 330-831-1958

Winona

Winona Area Historical Society’s 9th annual Christmas in the Country, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 1838 Meeting House at the corner of Winona Road and Cameron Street

The Hazel Circle of the Winona United Methodist Church, 32114 Winona Road, Cookie Walk and Craft Sales, 9 a.m.-noon. A variety of homemade cookies to choose from will be sold at $8 per dozen. An assortment of crafts items will also be available for purchase. No outside containers — containers will be provided.

SUN/12-5

Austintown

DARE (Divorce/Death Aren’t Really the End), breakfast, 10 a.m., Charly’s Family Restaurant; information at 330-729-0127

Beloit

East Goshen Friends Church Messy Church, 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Heaven & Nature Sing; information at 330-537-3177

Canfield

Angels for Animals Antiques, Collectibles & Christmas Sale, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

Columbiana

40&8 Haystack Breakfast, 7-11 a.m.; $8 adults, $5 children; dine in or carry out

East Palestine

Eagles breakfast, 8 a.m.-noon; dine in or carry out

Lisbon

Lions Club Bingo canceled until further notice

Midland

St. Anthony Club take out or dine in dinner, 12 p.m. – 5 p.m., Must call ahead and place order, $15 pork loin, potato, veggie & dessert or $15 penne pasta w/vodka sauce, chicken breast, veggie & dessert or $10 chicken pastina soup with crackers & dessert. Dining room will be open, public welcome.

Negley

Negley VFD monthly breakfast, with Santa, 8-11:30 a.m.; children under 10 years eat free

New Waterford

Eagles breakfast, 8 a.m.-noon, eat in or carry-out, 330-457-7230

Salem

Salem Elks Lodge No.305 annual Memorial Service for deceased members, 1 p.m., Elks lodge, 824 E. State St.

Salineville

Vendor Craft Fair, 1-6 p.m., Methodist Church; food for purchase; benefit for the youth group

MON/12-6

Columbiana

American Legion Post 290 Auxiliary Meeting, 7 p.m.; discussion of Wreaths Across America to be held on Dec. 18; information, Linda Moll at 330-518-3788

East Palestine

School board, 6 p.m., Elementary Media Center

Lisbon

Automatic Data Processing Board meeting, 10 a.m., auditor’s conference room

Finance Committee, 5:15 p.m., village hall

Negley

Middleton Township trustees, 7 p.m., township garage

New Cumberland

Hancock County Board of Education, 5 p.m., JDR IV Career Center

Perry Township

Township Zoning Board, public hearing, 5 p.m., township administration building, regarding zoning changes related to animals, zoning permit fees and penalties and a zoning change requested for a church property on Jones Drive.

Salem

American Red Cross blood drive, 2-7 p.m., Elks Lodge

City Planning Commission, 4:30 p.m., city hall council chambers, request to modify deed restrictions on Don Santee-Painter Road plat.

Drive Thru Banquet in Salem, 5 p.m. until gone (no later than 7 p.m.), Salem Memorial Building; sponsor: employees of the city of Salem; menu: sweet Italian sausage sandwiches with green peppers and onions, cheesy potatoes, green beans, applesauce, fresh vegetables, fresh fruit and cookies; one meal per individuals in the vehicle; line up behind Memorial Building, do not block East Pershing or park at library; information, Patty Colian at 330-831-2169

Committee of the Whole, 6 p.m., city hall

Salem Community Pantry food distribution to residents in the 44460 zip code, 9-11 a.m., masks required; choice shopping limited to two visits per month

Sebring

School board, 7 a.m., administrative office conference room; special meeting to discuss discipline of a public employee or official, with no action to be taken

TUE/12-7

Columbiana

City council, 7 p.m., city hall; Zoom link at www.columbianaohio.gov

East Palestine

American Red Cross blood drive, 1-6 p.m., First Church of Christ

Eagles kitchen open 4-8 p.m.; stuffed cabbage, parsley potatoes and roll, $8; 330-886-0397

Eagles kitchen open 4-8 p.m.; lasagna, side salad and roll, $8; 330-886-0397

Glenmoor

American Legion Post 736, 7 p.m.

Hammondsville

Saline Township trustees, 6 p.m., township complex

Hanoverton

Hanover Township Trustees, 8 p.m., township hall

Knox Township

Board of Trustees, 7 p.m., administration building; review bills at 6:45 p.m.

Leetonia

American Legion Auxiliary meeting, 6 p.m.

Lisbon

Veterans Service Commission, 1 p.m., veterans office, 7989 Dickey Drive Suite 1

Lisbon Historical Society closed, will reopen Jan. 11

Salem

Rotary Club of Salem, noon, Salem Community Center

United Quilt Guild Christmas Party, A La Catering in Canfield, doors open 6 p.m., dinner at 6:30 p.m.; reservations only

City council meeting, 7 p.m., city hall council chambers.

Families Anonymous, 7 p.m., First United Methodist Church cafe

Salineville

Kiwanis meeting, 7 a.m., Kiwanis Park/Russell Reight bldg.

Wellsville

Wellsville Jr/Sr High School and Daw Elementary holiday concert, high school auditeria, Daw Elementary chorus at 6 p.m., high school and eighth-grade choirs as well as Ebony & Irony show choir at 7 p.m.

Yellow Creek Township trustees, township hall, Oak Ridge Rd., 7 p.m.

WED/12-8

Elkton

Elkrun Township trustees, 7 p.m., administration building

Hanoverton

United Local BOE, high school library, 6 p.m.

Leetonia

Classes of 1958-61, 10 a.m., Das Dutch Haus

New Waterford

Crestview school board, 7 p.m., Performing Arts Center

Salem

Class of 1956, 11:30 a.m., Ezio’s

Salem Historical Society Christmas Light Trolley tour, 6:15 and 7:30 p.m., load at Dale Shaffer Library; $7 adults, $4 children under 12 years, free for children under 3 years; reservations at 330-337-8514, leave name, phone number, number in party, and the tours interested in

THU/12-9

Boardman

DARE (Divorce/Death Aren’t Really the End), 7-9 p.m., Boardman United Methodist Church; information at 330-729-0127; Christmas Gift Exchange ($10 gift required)

Canfield

American Red Cross blood drive, 12:30-5:30 p.m., Old North Church

Chester

Former employees of Crucible and J&L Specialty Steel/Cold Strips breakfast, 9 a.m., EJ’s Restaurant.

Columbiana

Oasis Food Ministry distribution, 4-6 p.m., First Christian Church; drive thru only, empty trunks; must have photo ID and live in Ohio; maximum two households per car

Damascus

Tops 1329, United Methodist Church, weigh in 9 a.m., meeting 9:30 a.m.

East Palestine

The Way Station/Kingdom Kloset, Presbyterian Church, 109 W. Rebecca St., 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Eagles kitchen open 4-8 p.m.; hamburger gravy over mashed potatoes and vegetable, $8; 330-886-0397

Knox Township

Mile Branch Grange soup sale, pick up 4-6 p.m., 495 Knox School Road, Alliance; $7 per quart; Loaded Potato and Stuffed Pepper; order by noon Dec. 8 at 330-821-8023 with name, number, type of soup and quarts

Lisbon

Cemetery Board, 9 a.m., in the Chapel

One-on-One Computer and Smart Device Sessions, 1-4 p.m., Lepper Library; appointments at 330-424-3117

Columbiana County Budget Commission, 1:30 p.m., auditor’s office; approved Emergency and Bond Levies and accept the tax rate abstract DTE 27

School board, 5 p.m., board office conference room

Lepper Library craft class for adults, Puzzle Piece Wreath, 5:30 and 6:30 p.m., contact the library at 330-424-3117 to reserve a time slot.

Architectural Review Board, 6 p.m., village hall

New Waterford

Eagles Wing Nite, 4-9 p.m., full menu, eat in or carry-out, 330-457-7230

North Lima

Drive-Thru Chicken Dinner, 3-6 p.m. or sold out, Calvary United Methodist Church; $9; stuffed chicken breast, mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans and a brownie; reservations at 330-549-2588

Salem

Salem Community Pantry food distribution to residents in the 44460 zip code, 3-6 p.m., masks required; choice shopping limited to two visits per month

Eagles, kitchen special, 5:30-7:30 p.m., dine in, carry out 330-387-8053

Salem Hunting Club Pistol League target shooting from 25 yards. Rim fore or center fire pistols permitted. Shot from indoors at 6 p.m. Open to the public

FRI/12-10

Boardman

DARE (Divorce/Death Aren’t Really the End), Card Night, 5 p.m., Perkins; information at 330-729-0127

East Palestine

The Way Station/Kingdom Kloset, Presbyterian Church, 109 W. Rebecca St., 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Eagles kitchen open 4-8 p.m.; beer batter cod fish specials, on a dish, $7; sandwich with side, $8; dinner with two sides, $10; shrimp lovers basket with side, $10; 330-886-0397

Moose Lodge fish fry, 4-7 p.m., carry out only, 330-426-3510

Leetonia

Drive By Christmas Light Display, 6-8 p.m., 40287 Kelly Park Road; Santa on site with treat bags for children; donations toward Sofia Angiuli, who is battling Leukodystrophy

Minerva

Minerva Second Friday, downtown shopping from 5-9 p.m.; information at 330-868-7979 or denise.freeland@minervachamber.org

New Waterford

Eagles fish Friday, 4-9 p.m., with full menu, eat in or carry-out, 330-457-7230

Newell

Lions Club book sale, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; $1 hardcovers, 25 cents paperback, 25 cents juvenile/young adult books

Salem

Salem Historical Society Christmas Light Trolly tour, 6:15 and 7:30 p.m., load at Dale Shaffer Library; $7 adults, $4 children under 12 years, free for children under 3 years; reservations at 330-337-8514, leave name, phone number, number in party, and the tours interested in

SAT/12-11

Boardman

DARE (Divorce/Death Aren’t Really the End), Road trip to Nut Cracker Village in Steubenville, meet at 3 p.m. at Old Perkins in Canfield; information at 330-729-0127

Canfield

Drive Thru Cookie Walk, 10 a.m., Calla Church; $6 per prepackaged dozen; information at www.callachurch.com or 330-533-6007

Chester

Lions Club distribution of Christmas food baskets, 9 a.m., municipal building; must show proof of West Virginia residency or photo ID

Columbiana

Silent Auction Book Sale, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Columbioana Public Library

East Liverpool

Christmas on the Hill, hosted by East Liverpool City Schools, 6-9 p.m., East Liverpool Junior-Senior High School, 100 Maine Boulevard.

East Palestine

Eagles kitchen open closed for private Christmas party

Goshen Township

Cookies to Go!, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Bunker Hill UMC, 15096 W. Middletown Road; $6 a dozen

Leetonia

Leetonia Police Department’s toy and food drive, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Family Dollar; new unwrapped toys and non-perishable food, no monetary donations; all items collected will be given to the St. Patrick Catholic Church and Leetonia schools for distribution to the families

Celebrate the Spirit of Christmas dinner, 5:30-7:30 p.m., St. Patrick Catholic Church; swiss steak, mashed potatoes, string bean almondine, salad, rolls with butter and homemade desserts; $15; dine in or take out; 50/50 drawing and Longaberger basket raffle; proceeds go toward church’s new roof; order at 260-458-7147

East Liverpool Review
Published 22 hours ago

WELLSVILLE HOLIDAY CONCERT

The vocal music department of the Wellsville Jr./Sr. High School and Daw Elementary will present a holiday concert in two parts Tuesday in the high school auditeria. To allow for social distancing, the Daw Elementary sixth- and seventh-grade chorus will present their portion at 6 p.m. The high school and eighth-grade concert choir along with Ebony & Ivory show choir will present their portion of the program after an extended intermission at 7 p.m. Selections will include classic holiday tunes as well as novelty numbers. Solos and duets will also be featured. A basket raffle will take place to benefit the junior high and high school vocal music departments. Pictured is a group of high school choir members, from left, front, Julia Wright, Shila Duke, Isabella Vallera, Kayla Morgan, Ryan Ehler, Mikayla Merriman; back, Timothy Newlen and Madison Plant. (Submitted photo)

East Liverpool Review
Published 22 hours ago

Christmas In The Village is back on Dec. 12 in Wellsville

Santa will be on hand to hear children’s Christmas wish lists and give families photo ops during Christmas In the Village event held Saturday, Dec. 12 at the Wellsville Alumni Center. The event includes live music, vendor shopping and auctions while raising money for many community-based efforts. (Submitted photo)

WELLSVILLE — Village residents mourned the loss of their old fashioned holiday festival last year due to the pandemic. However, in 2021, Christmas In The Village is back for its fourth year.

Sponsored by Mason Color Works, Wellsville Terminals co. and Numbers Brewery Company, the event is held from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 12 in the Wellsville Alumni Center, according to event organizer John Morrow. Chockful of excitement, the event includes photo opportunities with Santa; a coloring contest with prizes; a vendor fair; and live music with David J. Morgan (noon), Bill Crawford (3 p.m.) and Dave Byers (4 p.m.)

Randy Schneider, co-owner of Renovatio’s in downtown East Liverpool, will serve as master of ceremonies for the day.

Vendor spots still are available for reservation by Wednesday, Dec. 8 at $25 each. Vendors will begin setting up their booths as early as 10 a.m., so they are ready to go when the event begins. Contact Morrow at christmasinwellsville@gmail.com for information. Between the vendor fees, a 50/50 and a basket drawing, event proceeds benefit a toy drive, Wellsville’s Car and Share program and the Wellsville High School Alumni Association.

Four tickets to Cleveland’s A Christmas Story House Museum will been given to the door prize winner, explained Morrow.

At 2 p.m. winners of the event’s Ugly Christmas Sweater contest will be announced with $25 Amazon gift cards as the prizes.

Later in the day, two winners (one boy, one girl) can score a Dairy Queen gift card in the Kids’ Coloring Contest.

For more information, email Morrow or visit the event’s Facebook page at Christmas in the Village Wellsville.

East Liverpool Review
Published 22 hours ago

Boys basketball: Harding tops Galion in MOAC opener

By Andrew Carter - acarter@aimmediamidwest.com

Galion’s Quinn Miller (22) tries to pass the ball to a teammate under pressure from Marion Harding’s Matthew Thomas (35) during a Mid Ohio Athletic Conference boys basketball game played Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Marion. The Presidents won the game, 68-29.

Andrew Carter | AIM Media Midwest

MARION — After playing close with Galion early on, Marion Harding’s offense and defense kicked into full gear as the Presidents rolled to a 68-29 win over the Tigers on Friday night in the Mid Ohio Athletic Conference opener for both teams.

The Presidents (1-1, 1-0 MOAC) rebounded from a season-opening loss to Delaware Hayes with their victory. The Pacers edged Marion Harding 59-56 on Tuesday in Delaware.

The Tigers (0-2, 0-1 MOAC) are still in search of their first win of the new season after falling to Upper Sandusky in the opening game on Tuesday. Head coach Ryan Stover praised his ballclub for battling from start to finish against Harding.

“I think we fought hard. We played hard,” Stover said. “Sometimes we can be a little undisciplined about some of the things we’re trying to teach, so we get out of position, we get out of shape, we get beat down the floor when we’re not supposed to. But I know we didn’t quit. We played all the way, and I know it was a running clock, but we played all the way until the end.

“I thought in the first half we played well, but we’ve just got to find a way to make shots. We turned it over a little bit, yeah, probably more than we should, but I think overall with (Galion) coming off a losing season last year, we’re slowly turning the corner. There’s a lot of effort.”

Galion took a quick lead to open the game when Rece Payne drained a three-pointer, but Harding then went on a 9-0 run to grab a six-point lead midway through the first quarter. Galion pulled to within 9-6 thanks to a three-pointer by Jaxon Oswald and stayed close at 11-8 after Quinn Miller knocked down a two-point shot. However, Harding put together a 7-0 run to close the period with an 18-8 cushion.

The Tigers again scored the first points of the second quarter, but then fell victim to the combination of an offensive explosion and defensive lockdown by the Presidents. Harding outscored the Tigers 24-9 in the period to claim a 42-17 halftime lead. The Presidents then cruised to the home win in the second half.

Three players reached double digits for Harding led by CJ Temple’s 15-point effort. Marquis Long contributed 14 points and Wes Stokes, a first-team All-MOAC selection in 2020-2021, added 13 points for the Presidents. A total of 12 players scored for Harding in the game.

Stokes’ stat line included five rebounds, three steals, and three blocked shots. Long had seven rebounds and three steals. Temple recorded four steals. The Presidents finished with 36 rebounds.

“We wanted to play hard and we wanted to have a good first impression on our home court,” said Presidents head coach Jamie Pearson, a Harding alumnus in his first season leading his alma mater. “It’s not always easy to get high school kids to play hard, so for us tonight we decided we wanted to go up-tempo a little bit and get our guys flying around a little bit. I knew Galion would play hard and for us it was just a matter of matching the intensity of Galion. For us it was to get up and down and it worked for us.

“I knew we had a little more depth than them because they’re young, but (Stover) will do a good job. He comes from a good program. They’ll continue to get better this season.”

Oswald led Galion in scoring with eight points and Payne finished with six points. Steven Glew added five points while Hudson Miller and Jimmy Hardy tallied three points apiece. Garrett Ison and Quinn Miller had two points each.

Galion finished with 19 rebounds. Ison and Glew had four rebounds each.

The Tigers will be back in action on Thursday at home against Clear Fork. The Colts (0-3, 0-1 MOAC) are also in search of their first win of the season. River Valley (2-1, 1-0 MOAC) handed Clear Fork a 68-46 defeat on Friday.

Marion Harding plays a key early-season matchup against two-time defending MOAC champion Shelby at home on Thursday. The Whippets (2-0, 1-0 MOAC) defeated Pleasant (0-4, 0-1 MOAC) 67-37 on Friday.

Galion’s Quinn Miller (22) tries to pass the ball to a teammate under pressure from Marion Harding’s Matthew Thomas (35) during a Mid Ohio Athletic Conference boys basketball game played Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Marion. The Presidents won the game, 68-29.

https://www.galioninquirer.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/38/2021/12/web1…’s Quinn Miller (22) tries to pass the ball to a teammate under pressure from Marion Harding’s Matthew Thomas (35) during a Mid Ohio Athletic Conference boys basketball game played Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Marion. The Presidents won the game, 68-29. Andrew Carter | AIM Media Midwest

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Galion Inquirer
Published 22 hours ago

Notre Dame promotes Freeman

SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) — Notre Dame promoted defensive coordinator Marcus Freeman to head coach of the Fighting Irish on Friday to replace Brian Kelly.

Freeman, 35, takes over less than a week after Kelly’s surprising and abrupt departure for LSU with the Irish still in contention for the College Football Playoff spot.

Notre Dame released a video on social media of Freeman being introduced to the team at a morning workout for the first time as head coach.

“Marcus’ ability to connect with people, his fit at Notre Dame and the way he coaches young men set him apart as we went through our search process,” athletic director Jack Swarbrick said in statement. “I can’t wait to see how the culture created by these remarkable student-athletes continues to grow under the tutelage of Marcus and his staff.”

In a statement, Freeman said he was “eternally grateful” to both Notre Dame President Rev. John Jenkins and Swarbrick for the opportunity.

“Notre Dame is a very special place and I look forward to pursuing a national championship with the most outstanding student-athletes, coaches and staff in college football,” Freeman said.

Notre Dame scheduled a news conference on campus with Freeman for Monday.

Swarbrick said Tuesday, just hours after a brief 7 a.m. meeting in which Kelly said goodbye to the team, that Notre Dame would conduct a thorough search for the storied program’s 30th coach. The search didn’t last long as word began to leak on Wednesday afternoon that Freeman was Notre Dame’s choice.

Notre Dame officials acted fast to keep most of its staff together, with Kelly interested in bringing Freeman, offensive coordinator Tommy Rees, recruiting coordinator Mike Elston, strength and conditioning coach Matt Balis and others to Baton Rouge. Promoting Freeman was the final piece of the puzzle on Friday.

Notre Dame is on a run of five consecutive seasons with double-digit victory seasons and its leadership decided to prioritize continuity while also taking the risk of handing over the top job to a first-time head coach who is one of the newest members of Kelly’s staff.

Kelly, who became Notre Dame’s winningest coach in 12 seasons at the school, hired Freeman away from Cincinnati after the 2020 season. The former Ohio State linebacker spent four seasons with the Bearcats, helping Cincinnati develop into a playoff contender.

At Notre Dame, Freeman helped the Irish go 11-1.

in what was expected to be a transition season after making the playoff. He also established himself as a vital recruiter for Notre Dame. Less than two weeks before college football’s early signing period, Notre Dame has a class of verbally committed prospects that ranks fifth in the country, according to 247 Sports.

“Marcus Freeman has not only proven himself a superb football coach, he has shown – both in his time at Notre Dame and in my conversations with him this week – that he is a person of highest integrity who cares deeply about our student-athletes and is committed to their success in the classroom as well as on the field,” Jenkins, who is in Rome, said in a statement.

The Fighting Irish have won seven straight games since their 24-13 loss at home to Cincinnati (CFP No. 4) and finished the season allowing just two touchdowns in four November games.

Independent Notre Dame is No. 6 in the CFP rankings and idle heading into conference championship weekend. But it still has a shot to be selected for the playoff. If the help the Irish need doesn’t come, they are still in position for New Year’s Six bowl, possibly a bid to the Fiesta in Arizona.

The Notre Dame defense got off to a shaky start under Freeman, but finished strong to rank sixth nationally in interceptions (15) and defensive touchdowns (four), seventh in sacks (40), 11th in takeaways (23) and scoring defense (18.2 points per game) and 18th in third-down conversion percentage (.329).

The 40 sacks are one shy of the school record set in 1996.

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Salem News OH
Published 22 hours ago

POLICE REPORTS

SALEM

— Officers responded to the 500 block of South Broadway Avenue at 4:24 p.m. Friday in reference to an intoxicated person. The person was given a courtesy ride home.

— Kathy A. Johnson, 69, East Liverpool, was cited for failure to yield from a stop sign following a two-vehicle crash at Southeast Boulevard and Franklin Street at 2:52 p.m. Friday in which she allegedly pulled from the stop sign into the path of a vehicle driven by Joshua C. Kozic, 29, Lowellville. Johnson was transported to a local hospital.

— An officer responded to the 1100 block of Pennsylvania Avenue at 8:53 a.m. Friday in reference to a hunter seen close to the road. The officer found the issue to be outside city limits and contacted the correct agency to handle the matter.

— A student at 8:51 a.m. Friday advised the school resource officer of a serious issue he found on a group text. The officer observed the text messages and requested officers respond to the home of the individual in question. Officers advised the individual of possible consequences of his actions and the matter was forwarded to the prosecutor’s office for review.

— A 1300 block East Pershing Street resident reported at 8:32 a.m. Friday her ex-boyfriend had been knocking at her door before eventually leaving. She was advised to contact police if he returned.

— Officers responded to the 2100 block of Monroe Street at 10:51 p.m. Thursday where a resident reported his girlfriend had taken a swing at him, but caused no injury. The girlfriend denied any physical violence during a verbal altercation regarding their infant child. Due to conflicting stories and no signs of violence, one of the individuals was allowed to leave with the child.

— Someone reported at 4:18 p.m. Thursday being arrested Sept. 20 in the 400 block of North Lincoln Avenue and a woman who had her removed from the home had stolen multiple items from her vehicle. The matter is under investigation.

— An officer responded to the 200 block of West Pershing Street at 2:29 p.m. Thursday to speak with a male who got into a threatening conversation over text with several school students. The school resource officer was made aware of the situation and watch for the male on school property.

LISBON

— Police responded to a call at Lisbon Vet Clinic on Race Road about an abandoned camper Wednesday afternoon. The caller said on Monday a man had stopped in and asked if he could leave the camper for a couple days. The man did not leave any contact information at the clinic and the caller wanted the camper removed. Police advised the caller to wait a couple more days to see if the owner returned and then call a tow truck to have it removed.

— Wednesday at 2:07 p.m. a concerned male contacted police to ask for a welfare check. Officers located the subjects in the area of East Lincolnway and gave them a courtesy ride to their residence.

— What could have been a routine traffic stop in Lisbon landed a Leetonia man in jail Wednesday night. Police stopped Gerald Kenneth Kleinknecht of Lisbon Road at North Market Street and Morris Street for an expired registration when law enforcement learned there was more to the situation. Kleinknecht, who had failed to reinstate his drivers license, was also wanted on multiple active warrants by the county sheriff. Kleinknecht was arrested and transported to the jail by police. He was unable to find a driver to pick the vehicle up from the scene, which was towed and held pending proof of insurance by the registered owner. Police contacted the owner, a Salem man, and advised him of the situation.

— A clerk at Smith Oil on East Lincolnway called officers for help at 11 p.m. Monday. She said a man, appearing intoxicated, refused to leave the store and became confrontational, demanding service until the clerk threatened to call police. When they arrived, the man had already left as a passenger in a black Ford Escort with a white hood. Police were not able to locate the vehicle.

–Receiving a call shortly after 10 p.m. Wednesday, police were unable to locate a man who was reportedly seen walking on state Route 154 near Bluff.

— November 27, police arrived at the Lisbon Vet Clinic on Race Road just before 7 p.m. in response to a fire alarm. Upon arrival, police found a painting crew who stated that paint fumes kept tripping the alarm. Police cleared the area without incident.

— Salem Area Visiting Nurses contacted police Wednesday 9:12 a.m. to request a welfare check at a residence on North Market Street. Officers spoke with the subject and said the person was safe.

— At 10:30 p.m. Tuesday , police performed a welfare check on West Lincolnway after a caller said there was a concerning situation. When they arrived officers encountered a man and woman at the house. The woman said the man was smoking and that she wanted him to leave but he had refused. The man told police his father was in the hospital and he had nowhere to go. The two agreed to stay in separate rooms for the night and the man agreed to leave in the morning. Police advised the woman to call for any further problems.

— EMS were called to Subway on West Chestnut Street to assist an employee who appeared to be having a stroke. The man told police on the scene he felt pain under his left arm and the report states his face was visibly drooping.

— A minor car accident on East Washington Street caused some light damage to two vehicles but there were no injuries reported. Shortly before 7 p.m. Nov. 26, Denise Swabey called police to her address when she backed out of her parking space and struck another vehicle. No citations were noted on the report.

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Salem News OH
Published 22 hours ago

St. Edward tops Springfield, captures fifth big-school crown

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St. Edward running back Danny Enovitch runs behind the block of Ben Roebuck during the first half of the Division I state championship game Friday at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium in Canton.
By Curt Conrad, Staff Reporter

CANTON — Danny Enovitch and his Lakewood St. Edward teammates made Springfield pay for every mistake Friday night at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium.

Enovitch rushed for 210 yards and two touchdowns and the opportunistic Eagles scored all their points off Springfield miscues in a 23-13 win in the Division I state championship game.

GALLERY: Division I State Finals -- Lakewood St. Edward 23, Springfield 13

Lakewood St. Edward defeated Springfield 23-13 for the Division I state title Friday night at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium in Canton. (photos by Curt Conrad, staff reporter)

St. Edward (15-1) won its fifth big-school state title and first since 2018.

“I can’t say how proud I am of these guys for their attitudes all year,” St. Edward coach Tom Lombardo said. “The resilience and singleness of purpose was really evident.”

Enovitch provided an immediate spark for the Eagles, scampering 72 yards on the first play from scrimmage to the Springfield 1-yard line. The Wildcats (13-2) came up with a sensational goal line stand, however, denying St. Edward on four running plays to force a turnover on downs.

“It was only our first drive and it was the very beginning of the game,” St. Edward quarterback Christian Ramos said. “It would be silly of us if we got our heads down.

“We knew coming in they were going to be a tough opponent. They made the state finals for a reason.”

Springfield marched into St. Edward territory, but turned the ball over on downs at the Eagles’ 28-yard line.

That’s when Enovitch and Co. went to work. St. Edward drove 72 yards on 11 plays, with Enovitch rumbling the final 17 yards for a score to make it 7-0 with 51 seconds remaining in the first quarter.

Springfield went three-and-out on its ensuing possession and lined up to punt from deep in its own territory. The punt never got off, however, as the snap sailed over punter Cole Yost’s head and into the end zone. Yost fell on it for a safety and a 9-0 St. Edward lead.

Joel Castleberry returned the ensuing free kick 22 yards to the St. Edward 49. Eight plays later, Ramos connected with Connor Goodall for a 19-yard touchdown and the Eagles led 16-0.

“We just didn’t execute when we needed to,” Springfield coach Maurice Douglas said. “We didn’t do as good as we needed to on special teams.”

Springfield got on the board thanks to quarterback Te’Sean Smoot’s 9-yard touchdown run with 4:01 remaining in the second quarter to make it 16-7. The Wildcats had a chance to cut into the lead even further, but a field goal attempt on the final play of the first half was wide left.

Springfield took the second-half kickoff and marched deep into St. Edward territory, but Smoot’s pass for Anthony Brown was intercepted by Hayden Rice near the goal line. The Eagles then put together the drive of the night, going 92 yards on 14 plays with Enovitch scoring on a 9-yard run to make it 23-7 with 1:20 to play in the third.

The Wildcats cut it to 23-13 when Smoot hooked up with Brown on a 20-yard scoring strike early in the fourth, but Springfield had a field goal blocked later in the period. St. Edward was able to chew up the final 5:58 to secure the win.

“It’s really surreal,” Ramos said. “I’ve got a lot of emotions going through me right now and I’ve got to process it all.”

Enovitch agreed.

“Being a part of St. Ed’s, you’re part of a living legacy,” Enovitch said. “My whole family went to Ed’s. Adding on to that living legacy … is absolutely amazing.”

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Curt Conrad

I have covered high school sports in Richland County since 2000. Email him at curt@richlandsource.com or follow him on Twitter: Follow @curtjconrad on twitter.

Richland Source
Published 22 hours ago