The following news articles appeared on news media websites across Ohio today. Appearance on this website does not indicate endorsement by OSBA of any editorial or news item. OSBA does not filter the news, but simply posts educational news sent to us by pressrelations.com. To go directly to a specific category, click on the “Category” box, below.

Toledo Choral Society, St. Paul's impress in 'Messiah'

Toledo Choral Society, St. Paul's impress in 'Messiah'

If I didn’t feel in the Christmas spirit after attending the Toledo Choral Society’s Messiah at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church on Sunday, then I planned to get some sage to ward off those three visiting ghosts on Christmas Eve. But I think I can sleep easily now.

While not as awe-inspiring, perhaps, as Rosary Cathedral, St. Paul’s is glorious in its simplicity, greens hanging from the walls and brilliant red poinsettias at the altar, as well as those magnificent stained-glass windows. The setting promised an intimate experience with Georg Friedrich Handel’s oratorio, that is until the music began and the chorus rose to sing.

The majesty of the voices and the orchestra was aided by St. Paul’s organ played by Dennis Blubaugh and the harpsichord played by Andreea Lee. It was as if the church was shaking as everything collided in sound.

The Toledo Choral Society has been performing the Messiah since the society began in 1919. The piece is one of its major performances. And it shouldn’t be missed.

The soloists were all splendid, but Kirsten Kunkle’s clear, crisp soprano cut through the orchestra and rang throughout the church, as did mezzo Lydia Horvath’s, whose voice packed some punch. Tenor Gregory Ashe and baritone Kevin Foos fought with the trumpets, however.

Of course, I anticipated the test case, the signature piece that’s the Hallelujah Chorus. I knew that if I got the chills, the society had done its job. The performers passed the test, with an added bonus at the end as the “Amens” brought the piece to a thunderous close.

The sanctuary was filled, but people were masked and the chorus safely stood before the orchestra. And while there were about 240 people in attendance, according to executive director Richard Napierala, it was not jam-packed, and one had plenty of space.

So I recommend seeing the TCS perform the Messiah on Friday, at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Parish, 5856 Heatherdowns Blvd., at 7 p.m. Tickets are $25; go to toledochoralsociety.org.

And don’t stop there. On Sunday, the Toledo Symphony will perform the oratorio at 3 p.m., at Rosary Cathedral, 2535 Collingwood Blvd. Alain Trudel is the conductor; Jennifer Cresswell, soprano; Tyrese Byrd, tenor; and Thomas Dreeze, baritone. Although the show has sold out, you can check to see if they have returns. Tickets are $40. Call 419-246-8000 or visit toledosymphony.com.

Two Messiahs? Might that be too much to Handel? No. The experiences should not be missed.

Also on Sunday, the Ballet Theatre of Toledo performed the Nutcracker Suite, a shortened version of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker. Despite my advanced years, this was my first time viewing the ballet. The performance was charming and well done.

Even though I’m two days late (I am in the procrastinator’s hall of fame) for Giving Tuesday, extending a helping hand to these fine institutions can be done all year round. I’m not just talking about the choral society or the ballet, but other arts organizations that have lost so much revenue while shuttered during the lockdown. From the smallest organization to the largest, these are among Toledo’s treasures, whether you like opera or the symphony or prefer another genre. Losing even one leaves a little hole in the fabric of the community.

In the meantime, here are more holiday treats coming up. As always, check with venues to find out their coronavirus protocols. Be merry and bright, but stay safe and keep the rest of us safe, too. It’s a small price to pay.

■ The Toledo Symphony will be in Bryan on Friday, 7 p.m., St. Patrick Catholic Church, 610 S. Portland St., Bryan.

Also, the Toledo Symphony will get merry before it gets to the reason for the season with the somber Messiah. Christmas at the Peristyle is bound to be jolly for family and friends. The performance is at 2445 Monroe St. on Saturday at 3 p.m. Alain Trudel is the conductor, and Santa Claus will be the special guest. For family and friends of all ages. Tickets are from $10 to $42, with student tickets at $10. Visit toledosymphony.com or call 419-246-8000.

■ Huntington Center, 500 Jefferson Ave, Friday, 4 and 8 p.m. Trans-Siberian Orchestra in Christmas Eve & Other Stories. Tickets $33 and up at 4 p.m. Tickets $56 and up at 8 p.m. Purchase tickets at the Huntington Center box office, Ticketmaster.com, or Ticketmaster at 1-800-745-3000 (ADA orders only).

■ Kerrytown Concert House: 415 N. 4th Ave., Ann Arbor. Friday, 8 p.m., The Roe Bickley Kramer Trio, (rescheduled from Nov. 12). Rick Roe, piano; Bob Bickley, bass; Jesse Kramer, drums. The trio will take audiences on a musical fall color tour, through classic songs associated with the season by composers Vernon Duke, Vince Guaraldi, Thelonious Monk, and more, and original music inspired by autumn and composed by Roe.

Annual Croissant Concert with Today’s Brass Quintet Sweets & Suites. Saturday, 11 a.m. Featuring holiday brass arrangements with Today’s Brass Quintet. The Brass Quintet will usher in the holidays with both classical and popular tunes. This year, you’ll take your croissants and coffee to go!

Randy Napoleon Trio with vocalist Melissa Morgan, Sunday, 7:30 p.m. Playing Sassy, Lady Day, And Queen: Standards of Sarah Vaughan, Billie Holiday, and Dinah Washington. Tickets for all performances are between $10 and $45. Call 419-448-8544 during normal box office hours or visit kerrytownconcerthouse.com.

■ Epworth United Methodist Church, 4855 Central Ave. Saturday, 8 p.m. and Sunday, 3 p.m. Masterworks Chorale. Featuring beautiful and meaningful music for voices, both unaccompanied and with piano. Works range from "Away in a Manger" to "Up on the Housetop" and from J.S. Bach to John Rutter. Adults $20. Children $10. Visit masterworkstoledo.com or call 419-742-2775.

■ The Ritz Theatre, 30 S. Washington St., Tiffin. Saturday, 7 p.m. Tiffin University’s Christmas at the Ritz, featuring the Tiffin University Choirs and Bands, pop and commercial groups, Dance Team, and the TiffinKidz performing traditional and popular Christmas favorites. $12. Email info@ritztheatre.org or call 419-448-8544.

■ Christ Church Detroit, 960 E. Jefferson Ave., Detroit. Saturday, 7 p.m. Opera MODO: Detroit Aria Competition. Finalists from Michigan, Ohio, and Indiana compete in four categories: Rising Star 16-21, with a prize of $250; Young Artist: 22-29, $300; Emerging Artist: 30 and up, $500. Audience choice award $250. Free.

■ Sylvania Community Orchestra Concert, Franciscan Center, Lourdes University, 6832 Convent Blvd., Sylvania, Sunday, 4 p.m. Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2 in C Minor with local piano prodigy, Henry Shao. Sibelius’ Finlandia; Leroy Anderson’s iconic Sleigh Ride. Free.

■ Ann Arbor Symphony, Hill Auditorium, 825 N. University Ave., Ann Arbor, Dec. 10, 8 p.m. Holiday Pops. Kazem Abdullah, conductor. Celebrate the season with holiday hits. Tickets: $15 to $80. Call 734-994-4801 or visit a2so.com.

■ Simpson Garden Park, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green: Black Swamp Fine Arts School, Dec. 11, at 11 a.m., 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 12, 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. The Planets — A contemporary Ballet & Art Exhibit. Tickets, $15, at dancestudio-pro.com/tickets/bsfas.

■ Towne & Country Players, Norwalk First United Methodist Church, 60 W. Main St., Norwalk, Ohio. Dec. 12 at 3 p.m. The famous Tower Brass Quintet performing Christmas in Brass. Tickets range from $12 to $15. Sponsorships, VIP tickets are available. Information is available at 419-668-0637 or by writing T & C CONCERTS, P.O. Box 551, Norwalk, OH 44857-0551.

Send news of music up to one week in advance at the latest to Heather Denniss at hcdenniss@theblade.com.

Toledo Blade
Published 18 hours ago

Holiday Art Show shows off best of Toledo Artists' Club

Holiday Art Show shows off best of Toledo Artists' Club

Roberta Gedert

Special to The Blade

Dec 2, 2021

3:00 PM

The Toledo Artists’ Club is busy in the month of December with art sales and shows.

The TAC Holiday Art Show is installed at the club’s gallery at the Toledo Botanical Garden through Dec. 29. The exhibition includes paintings, photography and other mediums and can be seen at the gallery at 5403 Elmer Drive or online at toledoartistclub.com.

One of TAC’s groups, the Monday Morning Painters, has an exhibition that opened Wednesday at the Waterville Branch of the Toledo Lucas County Public Library, 800 Michigan Ave., Waterville. The artwork in that show can be seen during library hours through December.

Also this weekend is the Toledo Artists’ Club’s Heralding the Holidays Sale at the gallery on Elmer Drive.

The event features handmade art by local artisans. It will be open from 5 to 9 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.

Regular hours for the TAC studio and gallery are from 1 to 4 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays.

For more information, go to toledoartistclub.com.

■ The Arts Commission of Greater Toledo has installed its second round of signal box wraps, designed by local artists, in the city of Toledo.

The phase two designs were installed on traffic signal boxes at intersections along the East Toledo Main Street Corridor from International Park to Starr Avenue. The Arts Commission’s Art in Public Places program worked in collaboration with its Young Artists At Work apprentices and staff on the process of creating art in public spaces.

Phase two artists were led by Young Artists at Work instructor and alum Amanda Gargac, assisted by Maya Ruswinkle. Designers included Cania Allen, Andrea Jamison, Caramel Haviland, Delano Williams, Elisya Nieves, Sydney Handley, Zoe Murnen, and Laylah Chizmar.

In partnership with the Creative Placemaking program, Young Artist at Work — or YAAW — apprentices worked with the East Toledo Family Center, One Voice for East Toledo, community leaders and business owners leading Garfield Neighborhood Planning efforts in East Toledo to design the boxes to better connect Main Street and its neighborhoods to the Glass City Metropark and Maumee River.

The first phase of creative wraps went up earlier this year and included eleven signal boxes by local artists along Jefferson Avenue, from Summit Street to Collingwood Boulevard, connecting the Old West End to downtown Toledo.

Both phases had a “Flora and Fauna” theme.

For more information, go to theartscommission.org.

■ Bowling Green State University’s Division of Diversity and Belonging has put out a Call for Artists to participate in an upcoming visual and performing arts show focused on diversity and community.

The Art of Diversity: An Introspective Journey to Belonging will be on view Jan. 18-22 at the Wankelman Gallery at the BGSU School of Art.

Entry submission deadline is Dec. 10. Organizers are looking for submissions from artists in Wood, Lucas, and Erie counties, and the pool includes both adults and K-12 students.

The juried show will include monetary and best of show awards, among other accolades.

For more information or to apply, go to bgsu.edu.

■ A local muralist will be doing a free artist spotlight at 6 p.m. Dec. 7 at the Toledo Lucas County Public Library, 325 Michigan St.

Chris Rodriguez will share his creative process and some of his artwork at the event. The program is in conjunction with the collaborative group Toledo Creatives.

The arts column changes hands on Dec. 9. Send future news of art items at least two weeks in advance to Jason Webber at jwebber@theblade.com.

Toledo Blade
Published 18 hours ago

Robert W. Dickerson (1934-2021)

OTTAWA LAKE, Mich. — Robert W. Dickerson, Ottawa Lake’s fire chief for more than 30 years and Whiteford Township’s longtime treasurer, died Nov. 27 at Kingston Residence of Sylvania. He was 87.

He had developed health complications from diabetes, a disease he’d dealt with for most of his life, his son Bob said.

A lifelong resident of Monroe County’s Whiteford Township, Mr. Dickerson worked more than 40 years for the Sylvania school district, retiring a decade ago as head bus mechanic. Before that, he worked for his father-in-law’s Ottawa Lake business: a machinery and equipment repair shop and implement dealership.

“He told me if you can figure out how it works, you can repair it,” said his son, who succeeded him as head bus mechanic. “He always said do the best work you can, you can go home at night and sleep. He was driven to be a worker.”

Mr. Dickerson became a firefighter in 1956.

“Things have changed a lot,” he said in 2005, after the firefighters he commanded honored him for his service. He retired as chief several years later and remained on the department several years beyond that.

“Back when I joined, we had rubber coats. Now, with the equipment we wear, you can get into heat that’s so excessive that you don’t realize it,” he said.

One of the most memorable blazes he fought destroyed Ottawa Lake’s old railroad depot his first year on the department.

“Fifty years ago, the town was Ottawa Lake. Now there’s nothing there,” the chief said in 2005. “Where we put our addition on the fire station used to be a barber shop and a bar. Now you can’t even buy a sandwich in town. You gotta run up to Sylvania or up to Exit 5 [on U.S. 23] if somebody wants something to eat.”

He noted other changes.

“We don’t have too many fires anymore. Most of our work now is rescue work,” he said.

And women had joined the department, an advance the chief had been proud of.

“It’s much harder to be a firefighter now than when I started. There’s all the darn schooling you have to have; they have to be away from home all the time,” he said. “They’re the ones who make my job easy; they do all my work for me.” he said.

Brad Beck, who joined the department in 1995 and succeeded Mr. Dickerson as chief, said: “He was just an awesome firefighter’s chief.”

Firefighters learned from him that “you just did your job and were humble,” said Chief Beck, whose title now is Whiteford Township assistant fire chief for Ottawa Lake.

“He was so community oriented. He made a lot of sacrifices, as did his family,” Chief Beck said. “I’m a better person for knowing him.”

Mr. Dickerson was elected and re-elected township treasurer for terms that ran from 1984 until 2008.

He was born Nov. 18, 1934, as Anna and Walker Dickerson’s eldest child. He left school after eighth grade and worked on a nearby farm for room and board. He sent his earnings home to his family, his son said.

He was a former treasurer of the Ottawa Lake Sportsmen Club.

Surviving are his wife, the former Charlene DeVriendt, whom he married April 16, 1955; sons, Bob, Jeff, and Kevin Dickerson; sisters, Christina Jacobs, Margaret Thede, Gloria Morton, Susan Adsit, and Patricia Dickerson; brothers, Ronald, Albert, and Frank Dickerson; six grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren.

Visitation will be from 4-8 p.m. Sunday in the Reeb Funeral Home, Sylvania, with an Ottawa Lake firefighters’ service in the evening. Funeral services will be at 1 p.m. Monday in the mortuary.

The family suggests tributes to Ohio Living Hospice.

Toledo Blade
Published 19 hours ago

Frances Joanne Cardinal

September 19, 1928 - December 2, 2021

Send flowers Show you care.
Buy flowers for&nbspFrances
How does it work?

View guestbook

Follow story
Receive email updates when there are changes to this story.

Become the owner of this obituary to manage the guestbook, edit the notice, and more.

Frances Joanne Cardinal

September 19, 1928 - December 2, 2021

Frances Joanne Cardinal of Stow, Ohio passed away at home on December 2, 2021 after managing Alzheimer's Disease with determination and grace for many years.

Frances Joanne Cardinal (née Hall), age 93, was born on September 19, 1928, in Ashtabula, Ohio to loving parents Clyde Conrad Hall and Margaret Genevieve Hall (née Hotchkiss) as well as brother William Thomas Hall, Ph.D., whom she adored.

Joanne grew up and attended schools on Ashtabula's west side. After her junior year she transferred from Ashtabula High School to Edgewood Senior High School, from which she graduated in 1946. She loved her time in Ashtabula and enjoyed attending class reunions for both schools until very late in her life.

She went on to study Elementary Education at Kent State University where she earned her Bachelor of Science degree and became a certified teacher. She dedicated her career to teaching the fundamentals of reading, writing and math as well as appreciation for creativity, individuality, and respect. She taught third, fourth, and fifth grade starting in the Edgewood (Buckeye) District in Ashtabula, then Stow-Munroe Falls City Schools, Kent City Schools and, finally at St. Patrick School in Kent. She expertly combined a no-nonsense teaching style with a genuine appreciation of the students' humor, successes, and efforts. Upon her retirement from teaching, she joined her husband as an advisor with Ken Cardinal and Associates, serving educators from schools in thirty-four states and three Canadian provinces.

It was at Kent State University that she met the love of her life and, as she often said, "great guy" Ken Cardinal of Sebring, Ohio. They married on June 20, 1951, in Ashtabula just ahead of Ken's deployment with the United States Army to Korea during the Korean Conflict. She and Ken went on to have three children: Melissa Marie Habowski (Ron) of Kent, Ohio, Christina Louise Phillips (Jack) of Harrison, Ohio, and Vincent James Cardinal of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Joanne and Ken, members of St. Patrick Church, raised their family in Kent before moving to Stow in 2006.

Joanne was a member of the Alpha Nu Chapter of Alpha Chi Omega Sorority, the Portage County Retired Teachers Association, and the Chestnut Society. She enjoyed the company of family and friends, attending theatre events and traveling with Ken as his work took them around the United States and into Canada.

Joanne delighted in her grandchildren who are Jay Phillips (Erin), Katie Conley (Joe), Kenny (Rosa), Michael (Hannah) and Mark Phillips; Scott, Joelle (Bruce), Christopher (Susan) and Dale Habowski, great-grandchildren who are Aubree, Elliana, and Lauren Phillips and Lana Price; Parker and Owen Conley; Serena and Richard Martinez; Summer and Paige Habowski and great-great-grandchildren Levi, Layla, and Hazel Martinez; Alessandra, Marcele, and Aaliyah Witherspoon. She is also survived by nieces Cheryl Collins (née Hall), Roberta Orsini (née Hall), Deborah Safcik (née Hall), and nephew Christopher Hall.

She is preceded in death by her husband, parents, brother, and sister-in-law Patricia Hall (née Stickney), Uncle Harold Eugene Hotchkiss and Aunt Lena Lucille Hotchkiss (née Grey).

The family wishes to thank Jane Adya, extraordinary care giver and friend. Our thanks as well to Kindred Hospice.

The Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10:00 am, Tuesday, December 7, 2021 at St. Patrick Church, 313 North DePeyster St., Kent, OH 44240. Burial and graveside service will be held at Standing Rock Cemetery. Arrangements are being handled by BISSLER & SONS FUNERAL HOME in Kent. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Patrick School Endowment Fund, 127 Portage St., Kent, Ohio 44240.

Published on December 4, 2021

To send flowers to the family of Frances Joanne Cardinal, please visit Tribute Store. How does it work?

To download this photo, the file name must have less than 255 characters. If you are having trouble, click Save Image As and rename the file to meet the character requirement and try again.

Ashtabula Star Beacon
Published 19 hours ago

Parents captured after son charged in Oxford school shooting

U.S. Marshals on Friday night announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to the Crumbleys’ arrest.(CNN Newsource)

Published: Dec. 4, 2021 at 2:46 AM EST|Updated: 30 minutes ago

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, a sheriff’s office said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in Detroit, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A vehicle tied to the couple had been located by a Detroit business owner late Friday. The couple was found a short time later, and the pair were expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail.

A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the parents earlier Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.

The Crumbleys committed “egregious” acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

“I expect parents and everyone to have humanity and to step in and stop a potential tragedy,” she said. “The conclusion I draw is that there was absolute reason to believe this individual was dangerous and disturbed.”

Authorities said Friday afternoon that they were looking for the couple. Sheriff Mike Bouchard said their attorney, Shannon Smith, had agreed to arrange their arrest if charges were filed but hadn’t been able to reach them.

Smith, however, said the Crumbleys weren’t on the run and had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety.”

“They are returning to the area to be arraigned,” Smith had told The Associated Press.

Then Friday night, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to the Crumbleys’ arrest.

McCabe said the business owner in Detroit spotted the Crumbley’s vehicle and called 911. A woman seen nearby ran away when the citizen called authorities, the undersheriff said.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting, three days after four students were killed and others were wounded at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He’s charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a “war zone” and won’t be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, “No discipline was warranted.”

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. ... I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah,” she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”

___

White reported from Detroit. Associated Press journalist Mike Householder in Detroit and David Eggert in Lansing, Mich., also contributed to this report.

Copyright 2021 Gray Media Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

13 abc
Published 19 hours ago

Sebring Local Trojan Talk for week of Dec. 5

The Alliance Review

This week

Sunday – 8 to 11:30 a.m. Benefit Breakfast at Sebring American Legion hosted by Sebring cheerleaders. Tickets are $8, or $3 for those ages 3 and younger. Contact a cheerleader or Cassy Wynn or Addyson D’Ostroph to purchase tickets, which also can be purchased at the door.

Monday-Friday – Third-graders in Leann Laure’s class will conduct a Christmas Canned Food Drive at B.L. Miller. The drive will end at 8:30 a.m. Dec. 15. All contributions will be made into Christmas baskets to be distributed to families of B.L. Miller who are in need this holiday season. On Dec. 10, all boxes or bags of cereal (11 oz. or greater) and all boxes of Pop-Tarts (8 count or greater) will be worth 10 points each. The grade level that brings in the most cans (has earned the most points) throughout the drive will be treated to a pizza party Dec. 16. There will be one winner from K-5.

Monday-Friday – 11 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. P.I.E. plans its Secret Santa Sale at B.L. Miller Elementary. The sale also will include evening hours from 5 to 7 p.m.

Tuesday – 6 p.m. Sebring McKinley Jr./Sr. High School College Credit Plus Information Night. Representatives from Eastern Gateway Community College will teach about CCP, and how to participate during the 2022-23 academic year. Students from sixth through 11th grade who are interested in starting in the program and their parents should attend. The virtual presentation can be viewed at egcc.zoom.us/j/92461234225. Contact Michael D’Amico with questions at 330-938-2963 or email mdamico@sebring.k12.oh.us.

Dec. 9 – Second Grade Elf Interview Day at B.L. Miller. Second-graders will come to school dressed like an elf and will interview with Santa for a position at the North Pole. As part of the grade-level writing standards, students have been writing opinion pieces to convince Santa that they are the best elves for the jobs. Interviews will be held in the morning, and students will be "hired" based on their experience.

Ongoing event

Elementary basketball skills camps are ongoing in the B.L. Miller gym for third- through sixth-graders. Boys will play 2:30 to 4 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays. Girls will play 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays.

Upcoming events

Dec. 13-15 – B.L. Miller canned food drive continues. Reminder all items must be turned in by 8:30 a.m. Dec. 15. The grade that brings in the most cans (earns the most points) will receive a pizza party.

Dec. 15 – 6 to 6:20 p.m. Kindergarten class Christmas program in B.L. Miller gym.

Dec. 15 – 6:45 to 7:15 p.m. Grades one and two, Christmas program in the B.L. Miller gym.

Dec. 17 – Sebring Hall of Fame induction ceremony will take place in the gymnasium between the junior varsity and varsity games against Jackson-Milton. The JV game begins at 5:30 p.m.

Dec. 18 – 1 p.m. Sebring 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament at McKinley. High school students, graduates and adults are welcome to participate. This is a double-elimination-style tournament. Registration begins at noon. Cost is $40 per team (max of 4 people per team). Registration is not required. If you have any questions, contact Coach Knepp at lknepp@sebring.k12.oh.us.

Alliance Review
Published 19 hours ago

Parents captured after son charged in Oxford school shooting

School Shooting Michigan James, left, and Jennifer Crumbley are shown during the video arraignment of their son, Ethan Crumbley in Rochester Hills, Mich., on Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against the Crumbleys whose 15-year-old son is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school. ( (Uncredited)

December 04, 2021 at 3:07 am EST
By COREY WILLIAMS and ED WHITE

PONTIAC, Mich. — (AP) — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, a sheriff's office said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in Detroit, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A vehicle tied to the couple had been located by a Detroit business owner late Friday. The couple was found a short time later, and the pair were expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail.

A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the parents earlier Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.

The Crumbleys committed "egregious" acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

“I expect parents and everyone to have humanity and to step in and stop a potential tragedy,” she said. “The conclusion I draw is that there was absolute reason to believe this individual was dangerous and disturbed.”

Authorities said Friday afternoon that they were looking for the couple. Sheriff Mike Bouchard said their attorney, Shannon Smith, had agreed to arrange their arrest if charges were filed but hadn't been able to reach them.

Smith, however, said the Crumbleys weren't on the run and had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety.”

“They are returning to the area to be arraigned,” Smith had told The Associated Press.

Then Friday night, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to the Crumbleys' arrest.

McCabe said the business owner in Detroit spotted the Crumbley's vehicle and called 911. A woman seen nearby ran away when the citizen called authorities, the undersheriff said.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting, three days after four students were killed and others were wounded at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He's charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a "war zone" and won't be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, "No discipline was warranted.”

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. ... I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah," she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”

___

White reported from Detroit. Associated Press journalist Mike Householder in Detroit and David Eggert in Lansing, Mich., also contributed to this report.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Latest Trending

WHIO 1290 AM/95.7 FM
Published 19 hours ago

Parents captured after son charged in Oxford school shooting

A sheriff's office in Michigan says the parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a high school have been caught early Saturday.

44 mins ago

By COREY WILLIAMS and ED WHITE
Associated Press

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, a sheriff's office said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in Detroit, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A vehicle tied to the couple had been located by a Detroit business owner late Friday. The couple was found a short time later, and the pair were expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail.

A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the parents earlier Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.

The Crumbleys committed “egregious” acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

“I expect parents and everyone to have humanity and to step in and stop a potential tragedy,” she said. “The conclusion I draw is that there was absolute reason to believe this individual was dangerous and disturbed.”

Authorities said Friday afternoon that they were looking for the couple. Sheriff Mike Bouchard said their attorney, Shannon Smith, had agreed to arrange their arrest if charges were filed but hadn't been able to reach them.

Smith, however, said the Crumbleys weren't on the run and had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety.”

“They are returning to the area to be arraigned,” Smith had told The Associated Press.

Then Friday night, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to the Crumbleys' arrest.

McCabe said the business owner in Detroit spotted the Crumbley's vehicle and called 911. A woman seen nearby ran away when the citizen called authorities, the undersheriff said.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting, three days after four students were killed and others were wounded at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He’s charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a “war zone” and won’t be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, "No discipline was warranted.”

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. ... I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah," she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”

___

WFMJ 21 - TV
Published 19 hours ago

The life of Betty White, turning 100 next month, is a page-turner in new book

"You could make a convincing case that Betty White is the most versatile and beloved entertainer in American history," the author said.

Author: LYNN ELBER AP Television Writer

Published: 8:07 PM EST December 3, 2021

Updated: 8:07 PM EST December 3, 2021

LOS ANGELES — A photo of Betty White, with dimpled smile and guileless gaze, fills the cover of a coffee table book arriving the month before her 100th birthday. The image evokes the genuine White, according to the book’s author, Ray Richmond. After digging into her life and career, he concluded that she’s as warm and appealing as appearances would have it.

But her willingness to play against type, whether as scheming Sue Ann on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” or naïve Rose of “The Golden Girls,” proves how game and talented White is, said Richmond.

That, coupled with an impressive work ethic, carried her from a cameo on television in its 1930s infancy to the darling of “Saturday Night Live” in the 21st century, with a myriad of show business gigs along the way.

“You could make a convincing case that Betty White is the most versatile and beloved entertainer in American history,” said Richmond, whose “Betty White: 100 Remarkable Moments in an Extraordinary Life” (becker&mayer! Books) is out Tuesday.

Credit: AP

This cover image released by becker&mayer! shows "Betty White: 100 Remarkable Moments in an Extraordinary Life." (becker&mayer! via AP)

Besides starring in sitcoms and making guest appearances in dozens of others, she was a reliably witty game show host and guest; parade emcee (California’s Rose Parade and New York’s Thanksgiving Day parade) and soap opera actor (“The Bold and the Beautiful”). She dabbled in drama on the big screen (including as a U.S. senator in 1962’s “Advise & Consent”) and on TV (“Bones,” “Boston Legal”).

Hosting “Saturday Night Live” in 2010 — at age 88 — earned her a fifth Emmy Award and a new generation of admirers.

White, who will reach centenarian status on Jan. 17, 2022, didn't participate in the book. Richmond, a veteran entertainment reporter and critic, instead relied on research and interviews with her friends and colleagues, including Carol Burnett, Candice Bergen and Gavin MacLeod (Murray on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show").

MacLeod, who died last May at age 90, wrote the book’s forward. Saluting White as a great performer and “national treasure,” he deemed her “one of the most caring and loving human beings I’ve ever known.”

She’s also a pro, said Bill D’Elia, producer with David E. Kelley of “Boston Legal." Kelley, who had worked with White on his film “Lake Placid,” delighted in giving her salty language and bad behavior to play, D’Elia says in the book.

“David loved the contrast of her image versus what the character was saying,” he said. “She would happily say anything and do anything the story and script called for.”

The book briefly sketches the Illinois native's early years before moving to a breezily detailed account of White's success in Hollywood. The great loves of her life — husband Allen Ludden, who was a game show host, and animals of all breeds — also get attention. Among the book’s photos is one of the couple on the day of their Las Vegas wedding in 1963 (Ludden died in 1981).

There are also studio and publicity shots of White alone and with her co-stars. One was taken the night she, Bea Arthur, Rue McClanahan and Estelle Getty re-enacted scenes from “The Golden Girls” at a royal variety show in London attended by Britain's Queen Mother, who is said to have requested their performance.

Among the moments and milestones recounted in “Betty White: 100 Remarkable Moments in an Extraordinary Life”:

—After singing at her 1939 high school graduation, White and another student were asked to join an experimental TV test in Los Angeles. As the pair danced and sang on the sixth floor of a building owned by auto dealer and broadcast pioneer Earle C. Anthony, the performance was transmitted to the lobby. The audience: the teens' parents and a few others.

—When the United States entered World War II in December 1941, White, then just shy of 20, joined a women's volunteer organization that provided home-front support. She drove trucks carrying supplies for soldiers housed at Los Angeles-area camps during the day; at night, she joined dances for troops set to be deployed overseas.

—"The Betty White Show," with White hosting a half-hour of songs and interviews, debuted in 1954 on NBC. It included 21-year-old Black tap dancer Arthur Duncan at a time when people of color were rarely seen on TV. Station managers citing viewer complaints threatened to pull the show. A defiant White began booking Duncan more frequently, with the network's backing. Duncan, who became a longtime regular on “The Lawrence Welk Show” starting in the 1960s and is now 88, is quoted in the book saluting White for defending him and “opening a lot of doors for me in performing.”

—White moved in glamorous circles, and created them. Burnett recalls joining “game nights" at the White-Ludden house. Charades, board games and such were the entertainment, and “they would have people there like Fred Astaire just hanging around. And Burt Reynolds. My gosh, there were just so many,” Burnett said.

Cleveland MSNBC WEWS-TV Cable
Published 19 hours ago

Parents of the Michigan school shooting suspect have been captured

By The Associated Press

Published December 4, 2021 at 3:19 AM EST

James and Jennifer Crumbley are shown during the video arraignment of their son, Ethan Crumbley, in Rochester Hills, Mich., on Wednesday. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday against the Crumbleys, whose 15-year-old son is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.

PONTIAC, Mich. — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, according to a sheriff's office.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in Detroit, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A vehicle tied to the couple had been located by a Detroit business owner late Friday.

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since Friday afternoon. Sheriff Mike Bouchard said their attorney, Shannon Smith, had agreed to arrange their arrest if charges were filed but hadn't been able to reach them.

Smith, however, said the Crumbleys weren't on the run and had left town earlier in the week "for their own safety."

"They are returning to the area to be arraigned," Smith had told The Associated Press.

/ AP

This booking photo released by the Oakland County, Mich., Sheriff's Office shows Ethan Crumbley, 15, who is charged as an adult with murder and terrorism for a shooting that killed four fellow students and injured more at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, is charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes. Officials said he pulled out a gun at Oxford High School on Tuesday, fatally shooting four people and injuring seven others.

Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald filed involuntary manslaughter charges earlier Friday against the parents, saying they failed to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — "blood everywhere" — that was found at the boy's desk.

James and Jennifer Crumbley committed "egregious" acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

"I expect parents and everyone to have humanity and to step in and stop a potential tragedy," she said. "The conclusion I draw is that there was absolute reason to believe this individual was dangerous and disturbed."

By mid-afternoon, authorities had said they were searching for the couple. Sheriff Mike Bouchard said their attorney, Smith, had agreed to arrange their arrest if charges were filed but hadn't been able to reach them.

Smith, however, said the Crumbleys weren't on the run and had left town earlier in the week "for their own safety."

U.S. Marshals on Friday night announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to the Crumbleys' arrest.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting, three days after four students were killed and others were wounded at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said.

Jake May / AP

Photos of three of the four teens killed in the Oxford High School shooting are posted on the window at Sullivan's Public House Restaurant and Bar on Thursday in Oxford, Mich.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative's house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: "Lol. I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan's desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, "The thoughts won't stop. Help me," McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: "Blood everywhere."

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, "My life is useless" and "The world is dead," according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and "resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time," McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

"The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it's criminal," the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, "Ethan, don't do it," McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents' bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, "Just got my new beauty today," McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a "mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a "war zone" and won't be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, "No discipline was warranted."

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom. ... I believe that is a universal position. I'm not going to chastise or attack, but yeah," she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: "The investigation's ongoing."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NPR News

WKSU 89.7
Published 19 hours ago

Parents captured after son charged in Oxford school shooting

Caption

James, left, and Jennifer Crumbley are shown during the video arraignment of their son, Ethan Crumbley in Rochester Hills, Mich., on Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against the Crumbleys whose 15-year-old son is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school. (

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Nation & World

By COREY WILLIAMS and ED WHITE, Associated Press

Updated 26 minutes ago

A sheriff's office in Michigan says the parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a high school have been caught early Saturday

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, a sheriff's office said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in Detroit, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A vehicle tied to the couple had been located by a Detroit business owner late Friday. The couple was found a short time later, and the pair were expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail.

A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the parents earlier Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.

The Crumbleys committed "egregious" acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

“I expect parents and everyone to have humanity and to step in and stop a potential tragedy,” she said. “The conclusion I draw is that there was absolute reason to believe this individual was dangerous and disturbed.”

Authorities said Friday afternoon that they were looking for the couple. Sheriff Mike Bouchard said their attorney, Shannon Smith, had agreed to arrange their arrest if charges were filed but hadn't been able to reach them.

Smith, however, said the Crumbleys weren't on the run and had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety.”

“They are returning to the area to be arraigned,” Smith had told The Associated Press.

Then Friday night, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to the Crumbleys' arrest.

McCabe said the business owner in Detroit spotted the Crumbley's vehicle and called 911. A woman seen nearby ran away when the citizen called authorities, the undersheriff said.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting, three days after four students were killed and others were wounded at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He's charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a "war zone" and won't be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, "No discipline was warranted.”

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. ... I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah," she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”

___

White reported from Detroit. Associated Press journalist Mike Householder in Detroit and David Eggert in Lansing, Mich., also contributed to this report.

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows James Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows James Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows Jennifer Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows Jennifer Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer embraces Oakland County Executive Dave Coulter as the two leave flowers and pay their respects Thursday morning, Dec. 2, 2021 at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.(Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer embraces Oakland County Executive Dave Coulter as the two leave flowers and pay their respects Thursday morning, Dec. 2, 2021 at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.(Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Waterford resident Andrew Baldwin, cousin of Madisyn Baldwin, places candles at the base of a a memorial with his 5-year-old daughter Ariyah Baldwin on Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021 outside of Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. Madisyn Baldwin, 17, was one of four teens killed in Tuesday's school shooting. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Waterford resident Andrew Baldwin, cousin of Madisyn Baldwin, places candles at the base of a a memorial with his 5-year-old daughter Ariyah Baldwin on Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021 outside of Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. Madisyn Baldwin, 17, was one of four teens killed in Tuesday's school shooting. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Photos of three of the four teens killed in the Oxford High School shooting are posted on the window at Sullivan's Public House Restaurant and Bar on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Photos of three of the four teens killed in the Oxford High School shooting are posted on the window at Sullivan's Public House Restaurant and Bar on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer embraces Oakland County Executive Dave Coulter as the two leave flowers and pay their respects Thursday morning, Dec. 2, 2021 at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.(Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer embraces Oakland County Executive Dave Coulter as the two leave flowers and pay their respects Thursday morning, Dec. 2, 2021 at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.(Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

A football is left in honor of Tate Myre, one of the four victims who was killed in Tuesday's school shooting, at a memorial where family, friends, students and relatives of victims put up bouquets of flowers, candles and personalized messages near an entrance to the Oxford High School on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.(Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

A football is left in honor of Tate Myre, one of the four victims who was killed in Tuesday's school shooting, at a memorial where family, friends, students and relatives of victims put up bouquets of flowers, candles and personalized messages near an entrance to the Oxford High School on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.(Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

This booking photo released by the Oakland County, Mich., Sheriff's Office shows Ethan Crumbley, 15, who is charged as an adult with murder and terrorism for a shooting that killed four fellow students and injured more at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., authorities said Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. (Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This booking photo released by the Oakland County, Mich., Sheriff's Office shows Ethan Crumbley, 15, who is charged as an adult with murder and terrorism for a shooting that killed four fellow students and injured more at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., authorities said Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. (Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

Freshmen Rory Metzger, left, and Zachary Majewski place bows on trees outside Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Freshmen Rory Metzger, left, and Zachary Majewski place bows on trees outside Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Wreaths with black bows are shown at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Wreaths with black bows are shown at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Students hug at a memorial at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Students hug at a memorial at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Mourners grieve at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Mourners grieve at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Mourners grieve at a memorial at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Credit: Paul Sancya

Springfield News Sun
Published 19 hours ago

Food Distribution Around Lorain County

Dec 04, 2021 2:30 AM

Oakwood Park drive-thru mobile pantry, 2-4 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 9, at 2047 E. 36th St., Lorain. Call (440) 960-2265 for more information.

Sheffield drive-thru mobile pantry, 4:30-6 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 15, at 1662 Harris Road, Sheffield Village. Call (440) 960-2265 for more information.

Black River Landing drive-thru mobile pantry, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 16, at 421 Black River Lane, Lorain. Call (440) 960-2265 for more information.

Lorain High School drive-thru mobile pantry, 4:30-6 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 28, at 2600 Ashland Ave., Lorain. Call (440) 960-2265 for more information.

Saint Agnes Table of Plenty Food Pantry, gates open at 9:30 a.m., food distribution is 10 a.m. to noon Dec. 18 at 611 Lake Ave. Elyria. Enter on Bath Street. Car trunks should be clean and empty. The pantry is usually the fourth Saturday of each month. Elyria residents only.

St. Martin of Tours Food Pantry, noon to 2 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays of each month at 1800 Station Road, Valley City (behind the rectory).

Invest Elyria food pantry, noon to 1:30 p.m. the last Thursday of the month at 156 Pratt Blvd., Elyria.

Asbury UMC drive-thru food pantry, 10 a.m. to noon the first and third Saturday of each month at 1621 Middle Ave., Elyria. Call (440) 323-9596.

St. Patrick Helping Hands food pantry, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. the third Saturday of the month and 6-8 p.m. the following Tuesday at 512 N. Main St., Wellington.

St. Jude Helping Hands food pantry, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. the third Saturday of each month and 5-6:30 p.m. the following Tuesday at 590 Poplar St., Elyria. Please do not arrive until 30 minutes before start time. Call (440) 366-0118 for more information.

Goodwill Industries of Lorain County “Good Will” Food Pantry, 10 a.m. to noon every third Wednesday of the month at 145 Keep Court, Elyria. Participants must be income-eligible and bring proof of residency (photo ID).

Kipton Community Church, 6-7:30 p.m. every Tuesday at 511 Church St., Kipton. Call (440) 774-4148.

Beyond the Walls Church, 4-6 p.m. every Friday at 101 Woodford Ave., Elyria. Call (216) 903-0963.

Elyria Cares food delivery, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. every Friday. Income-based assistance program. Volunteer or apply at elyriacares.com.

Elyria Salvation Army, 1-3 p.m. Monday through Thursday at 716 Broad St., Elyria. Call (440) 323-2026.

First Congregational United Church of Christ, noon to 2 p.m. Mondays and 9:30-11:30 a.m. every Tuesday and Wednesday at 330 2nd St., Elyria. Call (440) 323-5454.

Lorain Salvation Army, 9-11:30 a.m. every weekday at 2506 Broadway, Lorain. Call (440) 244-1921.

North Ridgeville Community Care, 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. every Monday and Tuesday, and 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and 3-6 p.m. Thursday at 34015 Center Ridge Road, North Ridgeville. Call (440) 353-9716. This is for North Ridgeville residents only.

Oberlin Community Services, 1:30-4 p.m. every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 285 S. Professor St., Oberlin. Call (440) 774-6579.

Pathways Enrichment Center, 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Wednesday at 2505 Leavitt Road, Lorain. Call (440) 282-1109.

Vermilion Salvation Army, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Wednesday and Friday except the third Friday of the month, and 5-7 p.m. the first and third Tuesday at 4560 Liberty Ave, Suite H.

Well-Help food pantry, 10 a.m. to noon every Monday through Friday at 127 Park Place, Wellington. Call (440) 647-2689.

Elyria Hospitality Center, 10 a.m. to noon every Monday and Thursday (except holidays) at 244 Third St., Elyria. Call (440) 323-9409.

Lorain Cooperative Ministry

Christ Lutheran Church food pantry, second and fourth Monday at 4501 Clinton Ave., Lorain. Call (440) 277-6123 for more information.

Episcopal Church of the Redeemer community meals, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays and 5:30-6:30 p.m. Thursdays at 647 Reid Ave., Lorain. Call (440) 244-3134 for more information.

Community Congregational Church community meal, 5-6 p.m. second Monday of month at 379 S. Main St., Amherst. Call (440) 988-9148 for more information.

First Evangelical Lutheran Church food pantry, 10-11:30 a.m. second Thursday of month at 1019 W. Fifth St., Lorain. Call (440) 244-6286 for more information. Weekly Front Door Ministry, 10-11:30 a.m. Tuesdays.

Greater Victory Christian Ministries food pantry, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. first and second Saturday at 559 Reid Ave., Lorain. Call (440) 363-1040 for more information.

Heritage Presbyterian Church food pantry, 10 a.m. to noon second Thursday of month at 515 N. Leavitt Road, Amherst. Call (440) 988-9409 for more information.

Lorain Lighthouse United Methodist food pantry, 1-2:30 p.m. fourth Thursday of month at 3015 Meister Road, Lorain, Call (440) 282-2383 for more information.

Back

Elyria Chronicle Telegram
Published 19 hours ago

16th-seed Fairmont Senior claims W.Va. AA title

Cody Nespor FINDING SPACE — Fairmont Senior running back Germaine Lewis slips past Independence defender Atticus Goodson (3) during Friday night’s Class AA state title game.

WHEELING — Despite their record and playoff seeing, Fairmont Senior proved they are still the team to beat in Class AA as they took down Independence 21-12 Friday night to claim their third state championship.

After a 5-4 regular season, Fairmont Senior just made the playoffs as the No. 16 seed and then made a postseason run that culminated in another state title at Wheeling Island Stadium.

“It comes back to perseverance from our guys, a bunch of teenagers, with what they battled through,” said coach Nick Bartic. “I’m really proud of them.”

Their opponent Friday was No. 2 seed Independence, which enjoyed its best season of football in over three decades.

“To do all the things that’ve never been done in the history of the school and to go undefeated for the first time since 1986, that’s some special stuff,” said coach John Lilly. “To win three playoff games at home, when they’ve never won a playoff game since 1986, we don’t have anything to be ashamed about.”

Going into Friday’s title game, the Patriots paid no mind to the Polar Bears’ record or where they were seeded.

“We didn’t pay any attention to that stuff,” Lilly said. “Everybody knew that they were better than a 16-seed, there wasn’t any surprise in our room. To us, they were the state champs and they’re the state champs until somebody beats them.”

The Polar Bears and Patriots were locked in a defensive slugfest early on in Friday’s contest. The first quarter passed with no scoring as the first seven possessions of the game ended in punts.

Then, the offenses came alive in the second quarter. The Polar Bears struck first as quarterback Dom Stingo found receiver Evan Dennison for a 59-yard scoring strike and a 7-0 lead.

The Patriots also broke out on the following possession as quarterback Logan Phalin hit Trey Bowers for their own 59-yard touchdown pass. The point-after attempt was missed, however, and Fairmont still led 7-6.

Keeping the momentum going, the Polar Bears’ next drive traveled the length of the field and finished with running back Germaine Lewis hurdling into the endzone from two yards out for a 14-6 lead.

The teams traded interceptions to end the half and that score held into the break.

“I thought our offense stayed the course,” Bartic said. “We had drives, we made mistakes but we came back, and the defense didn’t get rattled when they made some big plays.”

Fairmont Senior was able to keep Independence’s imposing offense in check by doing something very few teams managed this season, limiting the effectiveness of running back Atticus Goodson.

Goodson, the Patriots’ Kennedy Award candidate, carried the ball 14 times for just 51 yards in the first half.

The third quarter started off reminiscent of the first, with the defenses taking center stage. Independence intercepted Stingo on Fairmont’s first drive, but were later sacked on a third down attempt and punted back to the Polar Bears. Fairmont subsequently drove most of the way down the field, only to turn the ball over on downs at the 24-yard line.

That is when the Patriots’ running game finally came alive. With Goodson taking a breather on the sideline, Judah Price took a pitch left along the sideline 48 yards into the endzone to make it 14-12 and give Independence a chance to tie with a two-point conversion. The Patriots attempted a handoff to Goodson on the try, but Fairmont’s defenders were there to make the stop and preserve their lead.

“We practice two-point plays a lot,” Bartic said. “That was just execution from our guys being in the right gaps.”

In need of a response, Lewis scooped up Independence’s squib kick on the ensuing kickoff and took it all the way down to the Patriot’s 38-yard line. On the very first play of the drive, Lewis took a handoff right and cut all the way back left across the field and went the entire 38 yards to the house to increase their lead to 21-12.

Lewis finished with 114 rushing yards and two touchdowns and was named Fairmont’s MVP of the game. Stingo completed 15 passes for 174 yards with a touchdown and two interceptions. Both Dennison (5-89) and Kayson Nealy (6-81) finished with over 80 receiving yards.

Defensively, Kruzel led the Patriots with 10 tackles and Toothan led with 3.5 tackles for loss. Nealy intercepted a pass by Goodson on defense.

For Independence, Goodson had a good second half to finish with 129 yards and was named the team’s MVP.

“I think everybody saw what kind of player he is,” Lilly said of Goodson. “We think he’s the best player in the state and I’m just glad that everybody around the state got to see him play. Sometimes we’re stuck down south and everybody doesn’t get to see him. I think Independence had a good showing here, we just came up short.”

Phalin completed three passes for 56 yards and a touchdown. Price ran for 60 yards and a score.

On defense, Price led the team with nine tackles and had an interception. Goodson had the other interception of Stingo and Jordan Harvey led with two tackles for loss.

“There’s no losers in the state championship, just one team won,” Lilly said. “All we have to worry about is getting back to work here in a couple of weeks and making it back here to try and win one.”

Fairmont Senior 21, Independence 12

F 0 14 7 0 — 21

I 0 6 6 0 — 12

F — Dennison pass 59 from Stingo (Longwell kick)

I — Bowers pass 59 from Phalin (kick miss)

F — Lewis run 2 (Longwell kick)

I — Price run 46 (run failed)

F — Lewis run 38 (Longwell kick)

RUSHING: F 31-124-2td (Lewis 13-114-2td, Ours 5-15, Tasker 2-9, Dennison 1-7, Stingo 6-(-18)). I 40-205-1td (Goodson 26-129, Price 7-60-1td, Phalin 1-(-2)).

PASSING: F 16-28 213-1td-2int (Stingo 15-27 174-1td-1int, Dennison 1-1 39). I 4-12 70-1td-1int (Phalin 3-10 56-1td, Bowers 1-1 14, Goodson 0-1 1int).

RECEIVING: F 16-213-1td (Nealy 6-81, Dennison 5-89-1td, Lewis 2-15, Ours 2-17, Dalton 1-3). I 4-70-1td (Bowers 2-50-1td, C. Goodson 2-5).

FIRST DOWNS: F 16. I 12.

PENALTIES-YARDS: F 7-50. I 5-50.

FUMBLES-LOST: F 2-0. I 1-1.

NEWSLETTER

Today's breaking news and more in your inbox

I'm interested in (please check all that apply)

Are you a paying subscriber to the newspaper? *

Local Sports

Nailers fight to finish in win over Cincinnati

WHEELING — The Wheeling Nailers brought their lunch boxes to work on Friday night, and came away with a ...

Steubenville Herald Star
Published 20 hours ago

EHS, WLU students set the stage for productions

Contributed CONSTRUCTION — Edison High School students recently learned about theatre construction during a workshop with officials from West Liberty University. Freshmen Jordan Hughes, at left, and Mariah Hunter gaining a few pointers in preparing stage flats for scenery from Rich Deenis, who was among those representing WLU, while senior Kayla Striker looks on from the seating area.

RICHMOND — Students from Edison High School teamed up with officials from West Liberty University to set the stage for future productions.

David Schultz, adviser for the EHS Drama Club, and school vocal music Director Greg Hofmeister joined more than two-dozen students and theater officials from WLU for a daylong Saturday workshop in stagecraft. WLU Assistant Theater Professor and Technical Director Meta Lasch, along with her husband and adjunct instructor Richard Deenis, met with the high school group to teach the finer points of preparing stage flats for theatrical scenery. Crews worked to gather and organize wooden boards and other materials, something they had not done in the past.

“I met Meta through the theater director at West Liberty, Michael Aulick,” said Schultz. “My students participated in last year’s monologue slam/competition hosted by West Liberty, which is how we met him and then, through him, Meta and Rich. (We did this) for professional help with the construction of our flats.”

He said the workshop was educational and enlightening, and now his students have a better grasp of what it takes to bring a production together. That knowledge would come in handy as the school held its first performance of the year, “The Sound of Music,” in November.

“Meta and Rich have been helpful, helping both myself and my students with this project. They have given so much of their free time to make this a successful event,” Schultz added. “I really liked that the students got a chance to work with materials that they otherwise wouldn’t have access to. They got a fantastic chance to see and do the technical side of set building and see if they had any interest in pursuing a career in stage construction.”

He noted that the flats will benefit the drama and music programs and he looked forward to working with the university again in the future.

“This experience gave my students great exposure to the technical side of professional theater.”

Hofmeister agreed, saying the lessons they learned will be very beneficial.

“With their supervision and us monitoring, the students were able to build flats, learn and organize our loft. The flats will be used for background,” Hofmeister continued. “From ‘The Sound of Music’ to Schultz’s productions, we’ll have more time after school to make (the scenery).”

Lasch was impressed with the students’ work ethic and said she would happily work with them again in the future.

“The students really wanted to be involved with the program and be able to do this on their own,” said Lasch, “I think Edison’s stage is forming and will be utilized to its fullest extent now.”

A few of the students said they enjoyed the workshop and learned something new.

“I liked doing the project,” said sophomore Chloe Brooks. “I learned a lot about cutting wood and measuring.”

“I liked it. This was fun,” added junior Aiden Ferguson. “It’s really hands-on and gets us involved.”

Meanwhile, Schultz added that all of the wood materials had been donated by Denoon Lumber and cited them as amazing supporters of Edison Local and the arts. Other items were acquired by the drama club and music department using revenue from fundraisers.

“We are incredibly humbled and grateful for such a donation. The flats built with this lumber will last decades and will positively impact dozens of classes of students thanks to the generosity of Denoon Lumber.”

NEWSLETTER

Today's breaking news and more in your inbox

I'm interested in (please check all that apply)

Are you a paying subscriber to the newspaper? *

Local News

Police investigate Gunfire

STEUBENVILLE — A driver in a dark SUV reportedly chased another vehicle across Woodlawn Road Thursday, firing ...

County wants to ‘beet’ snow, ice

STEUBENVILLE — A new tool in the fight against snow and road ice may prove helpful this winter season — beet ...

Steubenville Herald Star
Published 20 hours ago

Toronto light-up a solemn occasion

To the editor:

The Toronto Coalition is a group of people who join together for a common cause, in this case meeting the needs of the community. The coalition would like to thank the Toronto businesses which supported Light-Up Night on Nov. 23.

Their donations helped raise $4,930 to help meet the needs of the community. The businesses include Anderson-Campbell Insurance, Baby Boyz BBQ, Chris Arnott Agency, Clarke Funeral Home, Colonial Florists, Dark View Haunted Attractions, DiCarlo’s Pizza, Don’s Appliances, Dr. James Volk, Foster Funeral Home, Dr. Glenn R. Swearingen, Heritage Complete Home Care, Iggy’s Pizza & Pasta, Main Street Bank, Margaret’s Cafe, Riesbeck’s Food Market, Riverview United Methodist Church, St. Joseph and St. Francis Catholic Churches, Toronto Subway, Toni Moreland State Farm Insurance, Toronto Transmission Service and U.S. Bank

The organizations benefiting from the donations are Toronto Kiwanis Coats for Kids, Helping Hands Food Pantry, Toys 4 Toronto, Toronto Student Needs and the Toronto American Legion Honor Guard and Ladies Auxiliary.

The Toronto Coalition would like to thank all who purchased luminaries in remembrance of those who have passed or in honor of family members and friends.

The coalition would like to acknowledge all who made the evening possible, including the Toronto Beautification Committee, Toronto High School girls basketball team, Cub Scout Pack 41, elementary school students for tree decorations, First Presbyterian Church, Toronto city workers, the Rev. Eric Frey, Teddy Troski, Jon Greiner and Thomas Graham. Special thanks to Gabby West, a Toronto third-grader, who lit the Toronto Christmas tree at the Gazebo.

The Toronto Coalition wishes a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to all.

George Komar

President, Toronto Coalition

NEWSLETTER

Today's breaking news and more in your inbox

I'm interested in (please check all that apply)

Are you a paying subscriber to the newspaper? *

Letters to the Editor

Many make Steubenville shine

To the editor: As mayor of Steubenville and president of Historic Fort Steuben and the Steubenville Visitor ...

What we find in art

To the editor: Not that many years ago Andres Serrano, a photographic artist, urinated into a bottle. Then he ...

Helping animals is rewarding

To the editor: After I retired a few years ago, I began volunteering for the Jefferson County Humane Society. ...

Time for GOP to fight back

To the editor: Sen. Rand Paul has asked Biden administration whistleblowers to come forward, citing authority ...

Biden, Pelosi on slippery slope

To the editor: The Biden-Pelosi duo, Catholics only for political advantage, work to outlaw every sense of right ...

Steubenville Herald Star
Published 20 hours ago

DANIEL TOURNAY SR

Daniel Roy Tournay, Sr. of Weirton, a selfless husband, father, grandfather, and great grandfather, passed away on Thursday, December 2, 2021. He was 89.

On June 7, 1932, Daniel was born in McDonald, PA, to Gustave and Nancy Poudervigne Tournay. Dan grew up in McDonald, PA, wherein the seventh grade met the love of his life, Nancy Veydt. In his high school years, Dan attended Fork Union Military Academy in Fork Union, Virginia, where he was an expert swimmer/diver and graduated with the honorable title of Swordsman.

On December 7, 1951, he married Nancy Adeline Veydt. In their 70 years of marriage, they were blessed with a son, four daughters, seven grandchildren, and fourteen great-grand- children. Nancy worked outside their home as a teacher’s aide for Hancock County Schools. Daniel retired after 35 years from Weirton Steel, where he was the superintendent of the B.O.P. Dan was one of four men who traveled to Europe to research the basic oxygen plant and returned home to build the “Mill of the Future.” Sadly, with tears in his eyes, he was the only one of the original four living when they imploded the B.O.P. on March 9, 2019.

Anyone who visited the Tournay home knew that Dan not only took pride in making steel, he took pride in his home. There was no blade of grass or a tool in his woodshop out of place. His flower gardens were magnificent. But, most of all, Dan was a hero to his family and many neighborhood children; his calming guidance and selfless, sacrificial, and sometimes ornery nature will be cherished for years to come.

Even though Dan was generally a private person, he was a member of the Fork Union Military Academy Alumni, AARP, American Baptist Men, and the Weirton Heights Memorial Baptist Church. At the church, he served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees and a Member of the Board of Deacons.

In addition to his parents, Dan was preceded in death by his son, Daniel Roy Tournay, Jr on October 24, 1990; His brother, Howard, who lost his life in the invasion of Normandy, his other four brothers, Norman, Charles, Gustave, and Wayne Tournay, and his sisters, Naomi Longstreth, and Wilma Carnahan.

He will be remembered with love by his wife Nancy Adeline Tournay, his daughters Nancy C. Tournay, Donna M. (Dennis) Allen, Cheryl Lynn (Fred) Martin, and Susan Tournay Colpo; his daughter in law, Joan Strunak Tournay, his seven grandchildren, (Danielle Howland, Jennifer Marraccini, Dennis Allen, Andy Martin, Patricia Richards, Ronald Colpo, Jr., and Anthony L. Colpo) and fourteen great- grandchildren (Angelina Howland, Cecilia Howland, Daniel Howland, Zachary Howland, Isabella Veltri, Colin Veltri, Henry Allen, Lani Daughtery, Michael Daughtery, Luke Marraccini, Katrina Marraccini, Kate Martin, Zeke Martin, Evie Richards)

Visitation will be Sunday 2 pm until 6 pm at the Greco-Hertnick Funeral Home 3219 Main Street Weirton, WV, where funeral services will be held Monday at 11 am.

A live stream will begin at 11 am on Monday on the Greco-Hertnick Facebook page.

Rev. Bill Stout will preside.

Interment will follow at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens, Weirton.

Due to Dan’s love of children, please consider sending memorial contributions to the Weirton Christian Center.

Share tributes at www.grecohertnick.com

Steubenville Herald Star
Published 20 hours ago

Zende to head up Wheeling chamber

WHEELING — Kurt Zende is headed back to a familiar office, albeit in a new role.

The Wheeling Area Chamber of Commerce executive board announced Thursday that Zende, who had been with the city of Wheeling since 2005, would become the chamber’s new president. Zende replaces Erikka Storch, who left that role to become executive director of Project BEST.

This isn’t Zende’s first stint with the chamber. He was senior vice president from 1995-2000.

“It just was a natural fit for me, in my opinion,” he said. “I’ve been active in this valley for 30-some years now.

“I’ve had a wonderful time with the city for the last 17 years,” he said, “but I couldn’t pass this opportunity up.”

Zende is well-versed in economic and community development throughout the Ohio Valley, previously holding positions with the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce and the Main Street program in Steubenville, as well as with Wheeling as an economic development specialist.

Among his roles with the city was overseeing the development of Centre Market.

There have been some changes in the job, he said, including with the COVID-19 pandemic, which forced chambers of commerce around the country to pivot and evolve to assist local businesses through downturns. But a lot of programs that were in place in his first go-round remain, though they may have been expanded and added to.

Zende understands the president’s role and what the chamber has to offer in terms of governmental affairs advocacy and economic development.

“I think we’re living in a little different of a world with COVID,” he said, “but that’s not going to last forever. I think my role, from an economic development perspective, I look at what the chamber can do in that role. I think we’ll play more of a part in economic restructuring.”

Part of that, he said, will come in workforce development, bringing the business community together with local colleges and high schools to look at the vocational aspects of things to meet the needs of labor.

The executive committee was happy to see Zende step into the role.

“We are excited to welcome Kurt as our president,” board chair Tanner Russell said. “Kurt comes to us with a long track record in economic development, small business ownership and chamber management.”

Zende believes his Ohio Valley roots and his experience in that landscape will help him hit the ground running in the new job.

“I’ve known everybody for a long time in town,” he said. “I’ve known the major stakeholders in these roles and they know me, and I think we’ll be able to work together in a very productive way.”

NEWSLETTER

Today's breaking news and more in your inbox

I'm interested in (please check all that apply)

Are you a paying subscriber to the newspaper? *

Business

WVU Medicine Harrison Community Hospital gets funds

CADIZ — WVU Medicine Harrison Community Hospital received $18,650 from the 10th-annual Sean Carney’s Blues for ...

Weirton Board of Realtors elects officers for next year

WEIRTON — The Weirton Board of Realtors has elected officers for 2022. They are: Steve Roberts, president; ...

Franciscan University offering seminars

STEUBENVILLE — The Center for Criminal Justice, Law, and Ethics at Franciscan University of Steubenville will ...

Steubenville Herald Star
Published 20 hours ago

Weirton native among 2022 ‘Young Guns’

DR. LISA M. COSTELLO (Photo courtesy of WVU)

CHARLESTON — A Weirton native has been selected to be a part of West Virginia Executive magazine’s Young Guns Class of 2022.

Among the 10 inductees was Dr. Lisa M. Costello, assistant professor at the WVU School of Medicine’s Department of Pediatrics.

Among her numerous credits, she helped develop a mentorship program for the National American Academy of Pediatrics, and received the 2015 Advocate for Children Award from the West Virginia Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

More recently, she has been assisting the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources on the statewide pandemic response and helped launch the #LETSGO gratitude project.

The inductees were honored at a reception at the West Virginia Cultural Center in Charleston on Nov. 19.

WVE’s annual Young Guns honors program recognizes 10 outstanding West Virginians age 43 or younger who have accomplished great things in their careers and communities.

Honorees must have lived in the state and been in their West Virginia-based position for at least two years and must actively participate in community service.

NEWSLETTER

Today's breaking news and more in your inbox

I'm interested in (please check all that apply)

Are you a paying subscriber to the newspaper? *

Business

Zende to head up Wheeling chamber

WHEELING — Kurt Zende is headed back to a familiar office, albeit in a new role. The Wheeling Area Chamber of ...

WVU Medicine Harrison Community Hospital gets funds

CADIZ — WVU Medicine Harrison Community Hospital received $18,650 from the 10th-annual Sean Carney’s Blues for ...

Weirton Board of Realtors elects officers for next year

WEIRTON — The Weirton Board of Realtors has elected officers for 2022. They are: Steve Roberts, president; ...

Franciscan University offering seminars

STEUBENVILLE — The Center for Criminal Justice, Law, and Ethics at Franciscan University of Steubenville will ...

Oil and gas firms aid Toys for Tots

COLUMBUS — Ohio’s oil and gas industry is partnering with Toys for Tots in five counties in Eastern Ohio to ...

Steubenville Herald Star
Published 20 hours ago

Broadband access opportunities discussed

Michael D. McElwain TALKING BROADBAND — Jefferson County commissioners heard from Brooke-Hancock-Jefferson Metropolitan Planning Commission representative Adrienne Ward about the effort to bring broadband Internet access throughout the county. Tony Morelli, left, will be a part of a committe

STEUBENVILLE — Increasing the access to broadband Internet, especially in the rural, underserved areas, was a topic of conversation at Thursday’s Jefferson County commissioners meeting.

Commissioner Thomas Graham suggested that fellow Commissioner Tony Morelli join in or provide input to an organization looking closely at the issue. Morelli accepted the role.

Adrienne Ward, representing the Brooke-Hancock-Jefferson Metropolitan Planning Commission, told commissioners that funding opportunities are being explored. Different organizations — including the county — may be pressed into providing an allotment.

All told, a far-reaching, comprehensive broadband plan for Jefferson County could cost as much as $50 million.

“Right now, we’ve been reviewing requests for proposals from other areas — other cities, towns, counties,” Ward told commissioners. “We formed a small committee to review the requests for proposals, and when we get that done, we will release it.”

Ward added the group has been in contact with multiple providers who construct, install and maintain fiber networks. Ward also has a meeting set for Monday with the Ohio broadband office.

The effort to map the proposed service area addresses for the Ohio residential broadband expansion grant program continues.

“How do we (the commissioners) engage you with that plan (any broadband expansion plan) and give you money if we so choose?” Commissioner Dave Maple asked.

Ward said the committee is still looking at the final plan and funding options.

“Would it be too much of a request to have a commissioner on that committee as well?” Graham asked. He then proposed that Morelli be that commissioner.

Ward responded that a commissioner would be welcome, and that the committee planned to get together “in the next week or so to discuss what we want to do.”

Current committee members represent local schools, the city of Steubenville and the Jefferson County Port Authority.

“But it doesn’t really have county (representation). We probably need to have someone sitting in, especially since I think the money going to be asked for is probably a big chunk of money.” Maple said. “Maybe if everyone throws all their funds together, maybe $50 million is not as far-fetched as what we first thought.”

In the meantime, Ward said the search for funding is expanding.

“Because there are so many programs out there right now and there’s a lot of money, we just need to figure out how we’re going to piece everything together to make the best decision on using the funds,” Ward said.

For his part, Maple said a priority for him would be to make sure rural areas with no service are afforded an opportunity for at least a minimal broadband service before improving existing broadband speed to those currently getting fast access.

A new federal infrastructure bill could help fund the local effort, but Ward said the group would look at that as well if it passes and when details emerge.

NEWSLETTER

Today's breaking news and more in your inbox

I'm interested in (please check all that apply)

Are you a paying subscriber to the newspaper? *

Local News

Police investigate Gunfire

STEUBENVILLE — A driver in a dark SUV reportedly chased another vehicle across Woodlawn Road Thursday, firing ...

County wants to ‘beet’ snow, ice

STEUBENVILLE — A new tool in the fight against snow and road ice may prove helpful this winter season — beet ...

Steubenville Herald Star
Published 20 hours ago

No. 14 Utah beats No. 10 Oregon 38-10 for 1st Rose Bowl bid

Utah linebacker Devin Lloyd, second from left, celebrates alongside coach Kyle Whittingham, left, quarterback Cameron Rising and wide receiver Britain Covey (18) after Utah defeated Oregon 38-10 to win the Pac-12 Conference championship NCAA college football game Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chase Stevens)

LAS VEGAS (AP) — As the Utah players celebrated the Pac-12 championship surrounded by roses and confetti, the memories of two teammates who couldn't share in the moment was paramount.

The past year marked by tragedy following the deaths of Ty Jordan and Aaron Lowe will end with the long-coveted Rose Bowl bid.

Devin Lloyd returned an interception for a touchdown, Cam Rising threw for another score and No. 14 Utah clinched the first Rose Bowl berth in school history with a 38-10 victory over No. 10 Oregon on Friday night.

“Our mantra after the tragedy was we’re not going to get over it, but we’ll get through it,” coach Kyle Whittingham said. “I believe our guys really did that and I couldn’t be more proud of them.”

Jordan died last Christmas from a self-inflicted gun shot wound. Lowe, who also played with Jordan in high school, was then shot and killed at a house party in September.

Their teammates used the memories as fuel for a season that ended with a title.

“We’ve got a lot of toughness in us and resiliency, said Lloyd, who was named MVP of the game. “But at the same time, I also believe that they were there guiding us throughout the whole season. They were able to help us create things that I don’t think we ever would have done without them.”

This game was a near carbon copy of the one in Salt Lake City two weeks ago when the Utes (10-3, No. 17 CFP) jumped out early and won 38-7.

While that game all but ended the playoff hopes for Oregon (10-3, No. 10), the rematch delivered the Utes the Rose Bowl prize they had been seeking since joining the Pac-12 in 2011.

Utah had lost its first two trips to the conference title game, including two years ago to Oregon, but left little doubt this time.

“We’ve just been working away on it ever since we joined the league,” Whittingham said. “This is the culmination of a lot of years of hard work and effort, not only by us, but everyone involved. It takes a lot of people to make this thing go.”

Rising engineered a TD drive on the opening possession after converting a sneak on fourth down near midfield. Tavon Thomas capped it with a 2-yard run.

Lloyd then returned an interception 34 yards for a score later in the first quarter and Utah put the game away by scoring twice in the final 27 seconds of the first half.

Rising hit Dalton Kincaid on an 11-yard pass with 27 seconds left. Then Malone Mataele intercepted an ill-advised pass from Anthony Brown to set up Jadon Redding's 50-yard field goal on the final play of the half to make it 23-0.

The Utes led the game two weeks ago 28-0 at the half.

“Honestly, it seemed kind of similar,” Ducks safety Verone McKinley III said. “It’s tough because we felt prepared. We felt we had a good game plan and then to let what happened happen again was a tough pill to swallow.”

Thomas and T.J. Pledger added TD runs in the second half for the Utes to the delight of the huge contingent of Utah fans among the 56,511 in attendance for the first title game in Las Vegas.

THE TAKEAWAY

Oregon: The Ducks had playoff aspirations after winning at Ohio State in September, but struggled to maintain that level of play. They were upset at Stanford on Oct. 2 before getting outscored 76-17 by Utah in two losses over the final three weeks and were denied a third straight conference title.

Utah: The Utes are playing as well as almost anybody in the country late in the season with six straight wins. But back-to-back losses in September to BYU and San Diego State before Rising took over as starting quarterback mean the Pac-12 champion will miss the College Football Playoff for a fifth straight season.

MOMENT OF LOUDNESS

There was an emotional moment during a break in the second quarter when the Utah fans took part in their ”moment of loudness" to honor Jordan and Lowe.

A video tribute was played as fans lit up the stadium with cell phone flashlights and cheered. The Utes have held the “moment of loudness" instead of moments of silence to honor the former players.

Lowe’s mom, Donna Lowe-Sterns, also served as an honorary captain for the game.

“We etched their name in history, too,” Rising said. “That’s what we talked about all year and we really wanted to get that done.”

CONTRACT TALK

The lead-up to the game was filled with talk about the future of Oregon coach Mario Cristobal. There were reports that Miami was making a run at Cristobal, who won two national titles there as a player, and that the Ducks are doing what it takes to keep him.

Cristobal said he has not talked to any other school and if he had any news he would announce it.

“Let’s not create narratives as we sit here in this press conference,” Cristobal said. “Oregon is working on some stuff for me, that’s what I have right now, and that’s the extent of that conversation.

UP NEXT

Oregon: A bowl game to be determined.

Utah: The Rose Bowl on Jan. 1 against a Big Ten team.

___

More AP college football: https://apnews.com/hub/college-football and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25. Sign up for the AP’s college football newsletter: https://apnews.com/cfbtop25

Englewood Independent
Published 20 hours ago