The following news articles appeared on news media websites across Ohio today. Appearance on this website does not indicate endorsement by OSBA of any editorial or news item. OSBA does not filter the news, but simply posts educational news sent to us by pressrelations.com. To go directly to a specific category, click on the “Category” box, below.

Area Memorial Day activities slated

Communities around the county are preparing for Memorial Day. Above, Ron Schilling Jr., of the Marysville Parks Department, mows a portion of Oakdale Cemetery. The cemetery will host a service at 9:30 a.m. Memorial Day. (Journal-Tribune photo by Mac Cordell)

Local Memorial Day ceremonies will be in-person once again this year, though several communities have elected not to host parades.
Marysville ceremonies will begin at 8:15 a.m. Monday, May 31 at Schwartzkopf Park with an event to honor the dead lost at sea.
Retired Chief Petty Officer (Radioman) Max Amrine, a 30-year U.S. Navy veteran and former Veterans Service Commissioner, will present the wreath.
The public is invited to pay their respects, but are asked not to bring pets. Those attending should park in the north parking lot.
Ceremonies will continue at 9:30 a.m. at Oakdale Cemetery.
Special honorees will include prisoners of war and missing in action, military families and gold star mothers, while the 30th anniversary of Operation Desert Storm will also be recognized.
Seven wreaths will be presented at Oakdale Ceremony to honor the organizations comprising the Memorial Day Committee, as well as a wreath in remembrance of all prisoners of war and missing in action.
There will also be 11 wreaths posted to honor the veterans of the major conflicts in which the United States has been involved and one wreath for all those that have served in the military.
The VFW-sponsored Honor Guard will provide military honors.
Seating will be limited and those in attendance are asked to bring lawn chairs or blankets for additional seating.
In case of inclement weather, the ceremony will move to Veterans Auditorium.
U.S. Army Reserve Major Tracy Richardson will be the guest speaker.
Richardson and her husband Chris are graduates of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. They have three sons and have lived in Marysville since 1998.
She was deployed during Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm and earned a Bronze Star medal.
Richardson currently serves in the U.S. Army Reserves as a USMA liaison for Ohio.
She is also a member of the Ohio House of Representatives, serving her second term for District 86, which consists of Union and Marion counties. She previously served nine years on Marysville City Council.
Chaplain (Captain) Shane Bailey of the 2nd Squadron, 107th (OH) Cavalry Regiment will be the chaplain for this year’s ceremonies.
Bailey is a combat veteran of Operation Enduring Freedom in 2011 and 2012 and is currently serving with the Army National Guard. He is also a full-time chaplain at Ohio Health Rehabilitation Hospital.
He completed a Bachelor of Science in church ministries from Oral Roberts University and a Master of Divinity from Ashland Theological Seminary.
Bailey currently resides in Dublin with his wife, Kim, and daughter, Maddy. They have two sons, Chris, who is also a combat veteran and sergeant in the Ohio Army National Guard, and Nick, and a daughter-in-law, Macy.
Two local high school students will also participate in the ceremonies.
Skylynn Roberts will present General John “Black Jack” Logan’s orders establishing Decoration Day in 1868, which eventually became Memorial Day.
Roberts is the granddaughter of Dudley and Charlotte Blumenschein.
She will be a senior at Marysville High School in the fall. She is a member of Future Farmers of America and the Ag Sales team that won at the district level. She also participated in the Parliamentary Procedure team.
She has been a member of the Hoofbeats 4-H Club for six years and currently serves as vice president. She has participated in equine competitions, public speaking, Demonstration Day and communication contests.
Roberts also plays on a club soccer team. She is involved in her youth group at St. John’s Lutheran Church and is planning on going on a mission trip this summer.
She is the Buckeye Girls State representative from American Legion Post 79 Auxiliary.
Following graduation, she is leaning toward pursuing a career as a veterinarian.
Olivia Vollrath will present President Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address.
She is the daughter of Kevin and Melissa Vollrath. She has a brother, Ethan.
She attends Fairbanks High School, where she is entering her senior year.
She is on the volleyball team and is an active member of FCCLA, Student Council, Interact Club and National Honor Society.
Vollrath has also been a member of the Show-n-Go 4-H club for the past eight years.
She is a member of St. John’s Lutheran Church and is active in her youth group.
She is the VFW Voice of Democracy local winner and fourth place finisher at the district level.
Vollrath plans to attend the University of Findlay after graduation to study diagnostic sonography.
Nacrina Alvarez Blanco will sing during the ceremony at Oakdale Cemetery. She has sung at the Pentagon, the U.S. Naval Academy Chapel and opened for Diana Ross.
Following the ceremony at Oakdale, there will be a short service at Amrine Cemetery conducted by American Legion Post 79 and at the Catholic Cemetery conducted by VFW Post 3320.
There will also be a ceremony at VFW Post 3320 following the cemetery observances.
Marysville Memorial Day ceremonies are sponsored by the Memorial Day Committee with representatives of American Legion Post 79, VFW Post 3320, Disabled American Veterans Chapter 55, American Veterans Post 28, Blue Star Mothers Chapter 22, Hanna Emerson Dustin Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, 40 and 8 Voiture Local 857 and the American Legion and VFW Ladies Auxiliaries.

Richwood
Richwood Memorial Day services will be held at the Claibourne Cemetery beginning at 10:30 a.m. May 31.
The National Anthem will be sung by North Union junior Katie Smith as Boy Scout Troop 440, Girl Scout Troop 4802 and Cub Scout Troop 109 lower the flag to half-staff.
North Union High School student Laney Converse will read her VFW Post 870 scholarship-winning essay on “Why We Should Continue To Remember And Honor Veterans On Memorial Day.”
Honorary Sergeant of Arms Bill Moore and two Claibourne Township Trustees will place wreaths at the cemetery’s memorial. The Veteran Honor Guard Rifle Detail will salute the dead. VFW Post 870 Auxiliary member Dawn Howald will play Taps.
The ceremony is sponsored by VFW Post 870 and Post 870 Auxiliary, American Legion Post 40, Richwood Police Department and Claibourne Township Trustees.
Those who are unable to attend in person may watch a livestream on the Stofcheck-Ballinger Facebook page.
There will not be a parade in Richwood or a service at York Cemetery.
–––
Jerome Township
Jerome Township officials will host a parade at 9:30 a.m., beginning at Jerome Church and ending at the Jerome Township Cemetery.
Residents who would like to honor fallen veterans may also attend a ceremony at the Soldier’s Monument at noon. A short speech will be given followed by laying of wreaths and a community member playing Taps.
–––
North Lewisburg
North Lewisburg’s Memorial Day activities will begin with a service in Woodstock at 9 a.m.
The events then move back to North Lewisburg where A parade will be held. Line-up for the parade begins at 9:45 a.m. with start time set at 10 a.m. Children from there area may decorate their bicycles to take part in the event.
At 10:30 a.m. the village’s ceremony will take place near the monument in the park.

Marysville Journal Tribune
Published 6 months ago

Couple charged with shooting houses in Mill Valley

The Union County Grand Jury has indicted a local couple, charging them with shooting at and into Mill Valley homes.
Andrew J. Wiant, 40, and his wife Annamarie Christine Wiant, 34, both of 18100 Raymond Road, have each been indicted, charged with two counts of improperly discharging a firearm at or into a habitation or a school safety zone. Andrew Wiant is also charged with having weapons under disability. A 2001 conviction for felony aggravated possession of drugs prohibits him from having or even using a gun.
According to court documents, on multiple occasions in 2020, homeowners in the Mill Valley subdivision found bullets or bullet holes in their home.
The Marysville Division of Police partnered with the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation. As part of the investigation, detectives performed a series of tests to determine the flight path of the bullets. Because of the angle and location of some of the bullets, investigators actually rented a lift truck to extrapolate the bullet’s starting point.
Those tests led them to the Wiant home, essentially across Raymond Road from the homes.
A search warrant was executed at the home and investigators found a gun the same caliber as the one used to fire the bullets into the home.
Union County Prosecutor Dave Phillips said the Wiants had a target in their back yard.
“The allegation is that some rounds went past that target and into the homes in Mill Valley,” Phillips said.
He did say it is difficult to know whether Andrew or his wife was the one actually pulling the trigger.
He added, “there is no indication, and that is not the allegation, that they intended to hit the home.”
Even so, Phillips said investigators had been to the area several times before looking into the shootings. He said the Wiants knew or should have known their bullets were causing the issue.
“This is not an unknown problem to them,” Phillips said.
While the Wiants have not been charged with all of the incidents, going back several years, Phillips said he is “hopeful this will resolve the issue in Mill Valley with houses being struck.”
If convicted on all charges, Andrew Wiant could be facing as many as 21 years in prison and Annamarie Wiant could face as many as 16 years in prison.
Also indicted was:
– Charles L. Lipovich, 37, of 677 Stallion Way. Lipovich is charged with one count of domestic violence.
According to court documents, on April 18, Marysville police officers went to Stallion Way on a “wellbeing check” for the woman that lives there.
Police had learned that the woman and Charles Lipovich were in a dispute earlier in the day and that “there had been a physical altercation between the two.”
When officers arrived, the woman told police she had fallen earlier in the day and that Lipovich did not do anything to harm her. She said she did not want to remove her facemask. While the two were separated, Lipovich told an officer that he had pushed the woman earlier in the day.
He said the woman hit a banister and split her chin open. According to court documents, the woman eventually agreed to show police her chin, “but would only lift her face mask up enough to show her chin and not the entire injury that was up to the bottom of her nose.”
If convicted, Lipovich could be sentenced to as many as 18 months in prison.
Domestic violence is traditionally charged as a misdemeanor. After a domestic violence conviction, however, future allegations are charged as felonies.
In 2012, Lipovich was convicted of domestic violence.
– Shakira Graham, 26, of the Dayton Correctional Institution. Graham is charged with one count of assault. According to court documents, on July 29, Graham allegedly assaulted a prison official while she was an inmate at the Ohio Reformatory for Women. While the assault charge carries a possible five year prison sentence, Graham is already serving a life sentence for aggravated murder out of Cuyahoga County.

Marysville Journal Tribune
Published 6 months ago

Stow Area Job Openings: See The Latest

STOW, OH — Businesses in the Stow area are searching for new employees, and we've rounded up some of the best local job openings listed within the past week. Looking for full-time or part-time work? Here are the newest jobs available in the region, as compiled by Patch and ZipRecruiter. Click on any job title for more information, or to apply.

Editor's note: This list was automatically generated using data compiled by ZipRecruiter. Please report any errors or other feedback to content@patch.com.

Customer Service | Customer Service Associate - Baggage Agent

Greyhound, Stow, OH

Customer Service - Baggage Agent Summary: The Baggage Agent will perform activities in accordance with company standards to accomplish the Company objective of being the lowest cost and best provider ... More Info

Marketing | Consumer Services Lead

ResourceMFG, Hudson, OH

We are immediately Hiring for a Customer Service Lead in Hudson. Pay: $19.00 to $21.00 per hour based on experience Shift: Monday to Friday 7am to 4pm Job duties could include: * Supervise a call ... More Info

Sales | Sales Representative - Remote

$30 - $35/hour

NexRep, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

Sales opportunities for people that want more freedom and flexibility. When you combine the convenience of working from home with the flexibility of setting your own schedule, your work/life balance ... More Info

Sales | Territory Account Representative

PMA USA, Akron, OH

Territory Account Representative Washington National Insurance Company's largest American marketing partner, PMA USA, and is looking for the right individuals who have the desire to earn a good living ... More Info

Truck Driving | CDL Local Truck Driver - Home Daily - Average $75,000/Year + Benefits

$75000/year

Sysco Foods, Hudson, OH

Sysco is Hiring CDL-A Delivery Drivers Avg. $75,000+ First Year - Sign-On in Select Locations (Pay and Bonuses Vary by location, Apply for details) Local Routes - Get Home Daily Benefits: * Local ... More Info

Truck Driving | CDL Flatbed Truck Driver - Choose Your Hometime - Earn Up to $2/Mile

$545 - $745/week

Western Express - Flatbed Lease, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

Now Seeking CDL-A Flatbed Truck Drivers $2,500 Sign-On Bonus - Mileage Pay Up to $2 per Mile - No-Touch Opportunities! Have you ever dreamed of owning your truck and being your boss? Come experience ... More Info

Truck Driving | Need Recent Grad CDL-A Truck Driver Now, 05/23/2021, Great Home Time

CFI - Recent Graduates, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

CFI is Looking for Recent Grads! Excellent Pay and Benefits - Reliable Home Time Solo and Team Opportunities Available CFI offers several routes to becoming a professional Regional or Over-the-Road ... More Info

Truck Driving | CDL Truck Driver - Solo and Teams - Start at 65 CPM Base Pay

Paschall Truck Lines, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

Now Seeking CDL-A Truck Drivers PTL - 85 Years in Business and Growing Now announcing our largest base pay increase ever! Up to $0.65 CPM starting base pay & $5,000 transition bonus! Unique pay ... More Info

General Construction | CDL Independent Contractors - Earn Up to $200,000/Year + 99% No-Touch

$200000/year

Dart - Dedicated Independent Contractor, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

Now Seeking CDL-A Independent Contractors for Dedicated Runs! Earn up to $200,000 per Year - 99% No-Touch Freight - No money down! We've Just Rolled Out: * Earn up to $200,000 per year! * Dart has ... More Info

Truck Driving | CDL Truck Driver & Owner Operator - Flexible Home Time + Sign-On

Kenan Advantage Group - Food Products, Glendale, OH

Now Seeking CDL-A Company Drivers & Owner Operators New Increased Pay Package - Sign-On Bonus in Select Locations You can enjoy a home life and the open road with the many opportunities we have ... More Info

Truck Driving | CDL Truck Driver - Home Weekly - Average $75k-$82k/Year + $5k Sign-On

$75,000 - $82,000/year

Blackhawk Transport - Regional, Akron, OH

Now Hiring CDL-A Company Drivers! Home Weekly - Average $75,000-$82,000 Yearly - $5,000 Sign-On Bonus Here at Blackhawk Transport, we treat every associate and customer with honesty and integrity ... More Info

Warehousing | Part-time Receiving Associate

Burlington Stores Inc, Macedonia, OH

LOCATION 500 East Aurora Road Macedonia OH US 44056 Overview During these unprecedented times we recognize our role in helping to bring communities back to life. As a caring company, the health and ... More Info

Truck Driving | Need CDL Truck Driver Team Now, 05/23/2021, Earn up to 34 CPM Per Driver

$1500 - $1920/week

Transport America - Teams, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

Now Hiring CDL-A Team Drivers Top Pay as High as 34 CPM per Driver - 99% No Touch Freight Recent CDL School Graduates Welcome! We Raised Team Pay! New Pay Rate up to 68 CPM split Per Diem Allowance ... More Info

Sales | Sales Representative

Sleep Number, Randolph, OH

Overview This is an exciting opportunity to grow your retail sales career and experience unlimited earning potential in an innovative, team-oriented environment. Our proprietary products, exclusive ... More Info

Truck Driving | CDL-A Driver Trainer Truck Driver

USA Truck, Akron, OH

CDL-A DRIVER TRAINER TRUCK DRIVER JOBS CDL-A Driver Trainers: We've Simplified Your Pay! Earn Up To $110K! At USA Truck, we are committed to a positive driver experience. That's why we listened to ... More Info

Insurance | Sales Insurance Representative

Bankers Life & Casualty Company, Uniontown, OH

Sales Insurance Representative Bankers Life is growing and recruiting intelligent, dedicated, passionate, outgoing professionals to meet the needs of our exploding market. With an average of 10, and 000 ... More Info

Insurance | Sales Consultant - Insurance

Bankers Life, Uniontown, OH

Forget what you think you know about insurance sales - this is no boring desk job. If you are a recent grad looking for a fulfilling life-long career with above average income where no two days are ... More Info

Truck Driving | Class-A CDL Local OH

$25/hour

FFE, Akron, OH

Class-A CDL Drivers LOCAL SHUTTLE POSTIONS Available in Your Area! Home Daily * NO TOUCH FREIGHT * Hourly Pay Up to $25.05 per hour * Medical Insurance - we've got you covered * Dental Insurance ... More Info

Truck Driving | CDL Truck Driver - Home Weekly - Average $1,400/Week + $3,000 Sign-On

$1400/week

Ryder - Dalton, OH, Munroe Falls, OH

Ryder is Hiring CDL Class A Drivers Average $1,400+ Weekly + $3,000 Sign-On Bonus - No Touch Ryder is a commercial transportation, logistics, and supply chain management solutions company in business ... More Info

Truck Driving | Need OTR CDL Truck Driver Now, 05/23/2021, Excellent Benefits

Melton Truck Lines, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

Now Hiring Class A CDL Flatbed Truck Driver Experienced Drivers and Recent Grads Wanted $5, 000 Sign-On - Pay Based on Experience Based out of Tulsa, OK, and Melton Truck Lines is known for treating its ... More Info

Truck Driving | Regional CDL Truck Driver - Flexible Home Time - Earn Up to 56 CPM

USA Truck - Midwest Regional, Akron, OH

CDL-A Regional Truck Driver Jobs Earn Up to $.56 CPM! - Excellent Benefits Now, as you drive more you can earn more with rates as high as $.56 CPM! At USA Truck, we are 100% committed to a positive ... More Info

Customer Service | Customer Service Representative

Search Masters, Inc., Independence, OH

* Responsible for the daily operations of the customer service department including order entry and invoicing while maintaining excellent customer service through communication between sales, customers ... More Info

Truck Driving | CDL-A Truck Driver - Average Up to $90,000/Year + $1,000 Sign-On

$90000/year

Manning Transfer, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

Now Hiring CDL-A Company Drivers and Owner Operators Top Performers Average Over $90,000 per Year! Sign-On Bonus - Excellent Benefits with Health Savings Account At Manning Transfer, we are committed ... More Info

Truck Driving | CDL OTR Truck Driver - Start at 60 CPM + $3,000 Sign-On Bonus

Always Insured Logistics, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

Now Hiring CDL-A Company Drivers OTR & Regional CDL-A Company drivers can Earn 60 CPM Starting Pay - $3,000 Sign-On Bonus Position Details: * We pay: Starting 60 CPM Loaded and Empty miles (W2 or ... More Info

Customer Service | Customer Service Representative (680321)

Zimmer Biomet, Broadview Heights, OH

Job Summary Zimmer Biomet is a world leader in musculoskeletal health solutions. Our team members are part of a company with a heritage of leadership, a focus on shaping the future, and a mission ... More Info

Truck Driving | CDL Truck Driver - Earn $71,500/Year - Drop and Hook Freight

Navajo Express - Dedicated Drivers, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

Now Hiring Dedicated CDL-A Drivers! Dedicated Routes - Earn $71, 500+/Yr - Excellent Benefits - Drop & Hook Freight Our growth and commitment to our drivers continues in 2021, and with big plans on the ... More Info

Truck Driving | CDL Truck Driver - Home Daily - Great Pay + $5,000 Sign-On

$5000/week

Cordell Transportation - Dayton, OH, Glendale, OH

Hiring Dedicated CDL Class A Drivers Home Daily - Great Pay - Great Equipment - No Touch Freight! "Driven To Succeed..." Is not just a tagline; it is a culture that has been cultivated over the past ... More Info

Truck Driving | Class A CDL Local Truck Driver | Akron OH | Avery

$1,800/week

CPC Logistics, Akron, OH

Class A CDL Local Truck Driver | Akron OH | Avery Local Drivers | Line Haul | Dedicated Route | $1800 a week! Home every day! | 3 years of Class A experience required Call Alex at 877.378.2721 today More Info

Grocery | Produce Clerk PT

BJ's Wholesale Club, Inc., Akron, OH

BJ's Wholesale Club was the first retailer to introduce the warehouse club concept in the northeastern United States. Today and we're a multibillion dollar operation with more than 200 clubs in 17 ... More Info

Insurance | Entry Level Insurance Agent

Lincoln Heritage Life Insurance Company, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

Entry Level Insurance Agent What if your job was more than just a paycheck? If you're a driven individual that knows you've got room to grow and you'd like to see how far you can go in an ... More Info

Truck Driving | CDL Truck Driver - Multiple Routes Available - Flexible Home Time

KAG - Specialty Products, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

Now Seeking CDL-A Company Drivers & Owner Operators Local Routes Available - Excellent Benefits $5,000 Sign-on Bonus in Select Locations KAG Specialty Products is seeking Company Drivers and Owner ... More Info

Truck Driving | Class A OTR Company Driver

$1300/week

Midnite Express, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

HIRING COMPANY DRIVERSOUR OVER-THE-ROAD COMPANY DRIVERS CAN EARN UP TO $.60 PER MILE INCLUDING A GREAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM Fuel bonus program up to $.06 per mile Safety and performance bonus of $.04 ... More Info

Sales | Sales Agent

AAA East Central, Solon, OH

Sales Agent Uncapped earning potential Comprehensive benefits package Paid training We are seeking a full-time Sales Agent to professionally represent AAA and sell club memberships and insurance ... More Info

Sales | Remote Inbound Sales Representative - Home Warranty Sales

$10/hour

NexRep, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

As an Inbound Sales Representative, you'll be taking inbound sales calls from prospective customers of a leading home warranty company. Most of your time will be spent converting prospects into ... More Info

Truck Driving | Truck Driver - CDL ($3,000 Sign On Bonus)

Core & Main, Kent, OH

($3 and 000 Sign On Bonus and Home Nightly) You're responsive and flexible when working with people Priorities can readjust pretty quickly. What might be on top of the list at one moment could become ... More Info

Truck Driving | Hiring Local Class A Company Truck Drivers - Competitive Pay & Benefits

$1250/week

Venture Express, Glendale, OH

Earn up to $1,250 per Week (Based on Location) Daily Home Time Company Paid Life Insurance & 401(k) $500 Referral Bonus to the Driver and The Referred DriverCompany Driver Benefits: Earn up to $1,250 ... More Info

Insurance | Account Executive - Insurance

CNO Financial Group, Uniontown, OH

Are you seeking a better work/life balance and greater earning potential? All from a company that also invests in your success? Bankers Life is recruiting dynamic and dedicated insurance sales ... More Info

Business Services | Administrative Assistant - Richfield, OH

$20/hour

Adecco, Brecksville, OH

Administrative Assistant - Immediate Opening $20.00 per hour - 60-90 day assignment Richfield, OH This position will be assisting the Construction Manager with day to day clerical activities. Large ... More Info

Warehousing | 2nd Shift Domestic Shipper

$16 - $19/hour

ITW Permatex, Solon, OH

Company Description Permatex, Inc. a division of Illinois Tool Works (NYSE: ITW); is a leading manufacturer, distributor, and and marketer of premium chemical products to the automotive maintenance and ... More Info

Business Services | Office Administrator/ Administrative Assistant

$20 - $25/hour

Equitable Advisors, Akron, OH

Part Time Financial Services Assistant * Work from home or in our Akron office * 25-30 hours per week * Some flexibility of hours * $20-$25 /hr. Qualifications and Experience * 3+Financial Services ... More Info

Truck Driving | CDL Truck Driver - Home Daily or Every Other Day - Start at $70,000/Yr

$70,000/year

Castellini Group - Cincinnati, OH, Glendale, OH

Now Hiring Class A CDL Drivers in Cincinnati, OH! Home Daily/Every Other Day - Starting at $70,000 Per Year - Excellent Benefits Job Details: * Home every day or every other day! * First-year drivers ... More Info

Business Services | Production and Administrative Assistant

$16 - $18/hour

Alttran, Hudson, OH

General Summary: Provide administrative, organizational, and other general support to the production managers to maintain/improve order tracking, production specification distribution, production ... More Info

Truck Driving | Class A OTR Drivers

Climate Express, Stow, OH

Call (888) 850-1376 today or Apply Online Below Small Company -Top Pay for Class A OTR Miles Established in 1996 we are 210 trucks strong and still locally owned. Because of strong freight contracts ... More Info

Truck Driving | Owner Operators Local, Regional & OTR Positions Available

Live Trucking, Akron, OH

Hiring CDL drivers in your area. Apply once and choose a trucking job that works for you. Get home when you want to, and get paid what you deserve! Available Trucking Jobs: * Dedicated Lane - Regular ... More Info

Sales | Direct Sales Representative

SPECTRUM, North Canton, OH

At A Glance Full-time territory sales role ideal for sales pros and individuals looking to launch their Sales career who appreciate flexibility and with career advancement opportunities and unlimited ... More Info

Truck Driving | Class A CDL Driver

Mills Trucking, Northfield, OH

Class A CDL driver needed, good miles, good pay. Please call Larry at 216-533-7483 for a phone interview to go over complete details. Company Description Must call Larry at 216-533-7483 for phone ... More Info

Logistics | Delivery Associate DCM3 Cincinnati, OH (Starting pay $16.50/hr*+)

$17/hour

Amazon Contracted Delivery Partners, Stow, OH

Delivery Associate - DCM3 Cincinnati, OH (Starting Pay $16.50/hr*+) Shifts: Morning, afternoon, weekday and/or weekend Location: DCM3 - Cincinnati - 43500 Victory Parkway, Glenwillow, OH Compensation More Info

Customer Service | Permanent Work From Home Position - Inbound Customer Service

Disabled Veterans Solutions, Akron, OH

Disabled Veterans Solutions (DVS) is a nationally recognized provider of business and customer relationship management services, specializing in full service contact center solutions as well as ... More Info

Product Manufacturing | Bindery Fulfillment Tech

Hess Printing Solutions, Stow, OH

Job Title: Bindery Fulfillment Tech Department: Bindery FLSA Status: Non - Exempt Reports To: Bindery Supervisor SUMMARY: Coordinate and set up and maintain the processing of and reporting of all ... More Info

Truck Driving | CDL A Delivery Driver

Nichols, Bedford, OH

**Candidates should have a MINIMUM of 3 YEARS OF PRIOR DRIVING EXPERIENCE IN 48-53 FT. TRACTOR TRAILERS TO BE CONSIDERED FOR ROLE. CDL A Truck Delivery Driver Experience & Description: * The ideal ... More Info

Automotive Service | Tow Motor Operator

Empire Die Casting Company, Macedonia, OH

Job Purpose: Accomplishes job purpose by performing duties. Duties: * Accomplishes organization goals by accepting ownership for accomplishing new and different requests; exploring opportunities to ... More Info

Customer Service | Field Service Representative

Regency Pet, LLC, Richfield, OH

Paws Awhile , a member of the Regency Family, is seeking a hardworking and motivated individual to join our growing team who is detail oriented, energetic, and respectful! The Route Service Driver ... More Info

Event | Part Time Event Specialist

CDS, Tallmadge, OH

Part Time Event Specialist Are you outgoing and enthusiastic about interacting with people? If promoting the best brands to today's shoppers sounds appealing, then Club Demonstration Services (CDS ... More Info

Merchandising | Merchandise Associate

The TJX Companies, Inc., Akron, OH

Responsible for delivering a highly satisfied customer experience demonstrated by engaging and interacting with all customers, embodying customer experience principals and philosophy, and maintaining ... More Info

Merchandising | Merchandise Coordinator

The TJX Companies, Inc., Akron, OH

Responsible for ensuring the execution of merchandise presentation plans and priorities for assigned departments. Ensures an excellent customer experience by engaging and interacting with all ... More Info

Marketing | In person interviews for Part Time Brand Ambassador

CDS, Independence, OH

In person interviews for Part Time Brand Ambassador Apply today and join us on Wednesday, May 26th from 11AM - 3PM at Costco in Strongsville, OH for a CDS in-warehouse event. We will hire qualified ... More Info

Truck Driving | Time To Re Build with Cdla Truck Driver Up To 1600wk Home Weekly 3 Of 4 Weekends Per Month Pw ...

$1,600/week

PW Logistics LLC, Kent, OH

Cdla Truck Driver Up To 1600wk Home Weekly 3 Of 4 Weekends Per Month Pw Logistics Llc - PW Logistics LLC Cdla Truck Driver Up To 1600wk Home Weekly 3 Of 4 Weekends Per Month - PW Logistics LLCJob ... More Info

Customer Service | Inbound Customer Care Representative

$13 - $15/hour

Everstaff, Aurora, OH

EverStaff is looking for Inbound Customer Service Representatives in Aurora for a growing manufacturing company ! *Direct hire and immediate openings! * The Customer Service Phone Representative is ... More Info

Operations | Operations Coordinator

Vizmeg Landscape, Stow, OH

"UTILIZING OUR KNOWLEDGE, EXPERIENCE, and AND IMAGINATION TO CREATE A LEGACY OF ENJOYING THE OUTDOORS" * Do you enjoy handling the logistics of construction projects? * Are you a quick thinker with the ... More Info

Retail Store | STORE MANAGER CANDIDATE in Cuyahoga Falls, OH

Dollar General, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

Company Overview Dollar General Corporation has been delivering value to shoppers for more than 80 years. Dollar General helps shoppers Save time. Save money. Every day.® by offering products that ... More Info

Retail Store | Shift Manager

GetGo, Chagrin Falls, OH

Job Summary As a GetGo Crew Lead, you will exceed customer and Team Member needs and expectations by providing safe, efficient, accurate and pleasant shopping, purchasing and food services in ... More Info

Sales | Inside Sales

Direct Lender, Independence, OH

Our Inside Sales Team are the driving force behind our success!!! Come join our teamand make a difference in keeping the dream of home ownership a reality for many! A great team of mortgage analysts ... More Info

Business Services | Secretary Radiology-NIL

Cleveland Clinic, Akron, OH

Job ID: 120832 * Performs routine office duties such as typing correspondences, mailing, and other related activities, using and maintaining office equipment such as computers, copiers, printers ... More Info

Merchandising | Merchandising

Home Depot, Chagrin Falls, OH

Merchandising Execution Associates:All Merchandising Execution Associates (MEAs) perform in-store merchandising service activities such as merchandising projects, planogram maintenance, overhead ... More Info

Business Services | Office Clerk

Kelly, Barberton, OH

Temp to Hire 1st shift 8:30 to 5:00 Call Kathy ay 330-595-4115 E-mail resume to 4711@kellyservicrescom Clerk III - Office Experience: Customer Service Skills/No testing needed they will train/ Must ... More Info

Truck Driving | Class A truck driver

WME Express, Akron, OH

Make $ 100,000 yearly- home every week- no touch freight $ 1800 weekly average $ 90,000 yearly average + $ 10,000 bonus Paid in $ 1000 monthly payments = $ 100,000 No touch freight and 90% drop and ... More Info

Project Management | Senior Project Engineer

New Careers, Akron, OH

Senior Project Engineer Akron, OH $90-110K plus up to 20% bonus Our Akron, Ohio client is looking to hire a Senior Project Engineer. This Project Engineering position focuses on designing, developing ... More Info

Truck Driving | Truck Driver Class A Home Weekly Completion of SAP ACCEPTED

CDL A Driver Recruiter, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

5 day work week regional on the road.Leave out Sunday afternoon or Monday morning be back by 6PM Friday Evening. This is a no touch driving position. 1100.00 a week guaranteed (must follow company ... More Info

Sales | Sales Support Representative

LBS, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

HERE IS YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO A PART OF AN ELITE TEAM AS A SALES SUPPORT REPRESENTATIVE! At Legacy, we are seeking competitive, hard-working, enthusiastic, and committed individuals to join our team ... More Info

Stow Patch.com
Published 6 months ago

Gordon Food Service looks to fill jobs in Springfield

A file photo of Gordon Food Service's Springfield Distribution Center in 2014. Staff photo by Jeff Guerini

Credit: Jeff Guerini/STAFF

Credit: Jeff Guerini/STAFF

News | 29 minutes ago

By Hasan Karim

Gordon Food Service will be holding a direct-hire job fair at its distribution center in Springfield on Tuesday as well as another event on June 2.

The goal is to provide a space for job seekers as they apply for openings at the foodservice distributer. Those interested will also have an opportunity to participate in interviews and potentially receive an offer on the spot.

The 520,000 square foot distribution center is located in Springfield at 4980 Gateway Blvd and it currently employs 600 people and offers two shifts.

ExploreSpringfield family purchases bowling alley: ‘We bought Northridge Lanes to carry on his legacy.’

The job fair on Tuesday will last from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. A similar event at the facility that will be held on Wednesday, June 2, will go from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

The facility provides foodservice delivery to restaurants, K-12 schools and higher education institutions, as well as hospitals and other healthcare settings, according to a recent news release from Gordon Food Service.

The company is currently looking to fill a number of positions in Springfield. However, the exact number of new employees it is looking to hire was not released by the company.

Current job openings at the Springfield facility include selectors, packers, freight handlers, and regional route delivery drivers for its warehouse and transportation departments.

Wages for the warehouse roles average between $17.64 and $18.24 per hour. Transportation wages at the company vary and an exact range was not provided to this news organization by Gordon Food Service.

Explore

Representatives of the company said in the news release that the foodservice distributor offers an array of benefits such as comprehensive medical and dental coverage, profit sharing, retirement savings match and bonuses.

“We serve our customers so they can provide a great experience and memories for their guests, residents, patients and students,” said Kevin Kolenda, the general manager of the Springfield distribution center.

“And we serve our communities as we do our part to create a great environment for families to thrive. As this family-owned company continues to grow, we are looking for new team members that share a passion to serve that mission,” Kolenda added.

Springfield News Sun
Published 6 months ago

Nation's largest public school district will be all in person this fall

New York City schools will be all in person this fall with no remote options, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Monday.
"We can't have a full recovery without full-strength schools, everyone back, sitting in those classrooms, kids learning again," de Blasio said on MSNBC's "Morning Joe."
The roughly 1 million students who attend traditional public schools will be in their classrooms with some version of the coronavirus protocols that have been in place in the current academic year, including mask wearing and COVID-19 testing, de Blasio said.
"It's time. It's really time to go full strength now," he said.
After closing schools in March 2020, New York City was one of the first large U.S. cities to reopen school buildings in the fall of that year, but the majority of parents chose online-only learning for their children.
Children and staff members who have been in physical schoolrooms have been randomly tested for COVID-19, and the city has reported very low rates of virus transmission in the schools.
Asked how city education officials could overcome the fears of parents who have thus far chosen online-only learning for their children, de Blasio said that "a lot of information, a lot of communication" would be the answer.
He said parents would be invited to visit their children's schools starting in June to get "reacclimated" to the idea of in-person school.
"Anyone who has a question or concern, come into your child's school. See what's going on, get the answers," the mayor said.
The announcement comes a week after New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy announced that the state's public schools would open for in-person learning only in the fall.
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who has clashed with de Blasio throughout the pandemic over who has the right to set COVID-19 rules in New York City schools, has not announced any statewide policy for the 2021-2022 school year.
De Blasio said city schools would be able to accommodate all students under current guidelines from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that call for 3 feet of separation, but he speculated that the standard may be relaxed before the city's public schools open on Sept. 13.
"I think the CDC'll be changing those rules quite a bit between now and September," de Blasio said. "But right now in New York City, we could have every child three feet apart, we could make that work if we had to."

wlwt.com
Published 6 months ago

Monroe council to discuss safety concerns at intersection where crash killed woman, nephew

Members of Monroe City Council are expected to discuss safety issues at the corner of Ohio 63/Main Street during Tuesday's meeting. Two people were killed in the intersection recently. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF

News | 3 hours ago

By Rick McCrabb

Monroe city council member Christina McElfresh called a double fatal in the city’s busiest intersection “an absolute tragedy” after a woman and her nephew were killed.

Council members are expected to discuss potential solutions to reduce the number of crashes in the city, particularly on Ohio 63, McElfresh said. The item is listed on the agenda for Tuesday night’s council meeting that starts at 6:30 p.m.

Since 2018, there have been 94 crashes at the intersection, including 57 non-injury, 36 injury and one fatal, according to Monroe police crash reports obtained by The Journal-News.

ExploreMiddletown group gets $49K for security to address homeless issue downtown

The fatal crash occurred May 14 when a tractor-trailer and silver sedan crashed, shutting down the intersection for hours.

Marita Avery, 59, a classroom educational assistant at Crossroads Middle School, part of the Fairfield district, and her nephew, Anthony L. Mitchell, 26, were killed.

Mitchell, the passenger in the silver sedan, was dead when crews arrived, police said in a release. He died from multiple traumatic injuries and his death was ruled an accident, according to the Butler County Coroner’s Office.

Avery, the driver of the sedan, was transported by CareFlight to Miami Valley Hospital in Dayton where she died at 4:23 p.m. May 14, according to the Montgomery County Coroner’s Office.

The driver of tractor-trailer was not injured, police said.

Monroe police are still investigating the crash and reviewing the two vehicles involved, said Officer Joshua King.

Days after the double fatal, Monroe citizens circulated a petition on social media that says they “demand a lower speed limit” and turn-only green lights east and west bound on Ohio 63 and Main Street intersection, and “prepare to stop flashing lights” at the following intersections: Ohio 63/Main Street, Britton Lane/Ohio 63, and Yankee Road/Ohio 63.

Avery was described by co-workers at Crossroads Middle School as a passionate advocate for the students she worked with since joining the Fairfield school system in 2016.

“Marita didn’t see a difficult kid, rather she would see a kid that was in need of a little more love,” said Crossroads’ Principal David Maine.

Francine Ross, school secretary, called Avery “such a light in this world.”

Gina Gentry-Fletcher, spokeswoman for the district, said Avery “had a way of making everyone that she came into contact with feel like they were an old friend. She never met a stranger. Her passing is a huge loss to the district, Crossroads and all the students she served over the years.”

Journal-News.com
Published 6 months ago

Travelers have mixed emotions about Memorial Day travel: What to expect

More than 1 million Ohioans are expected to travel this Memorial Day week, according to AAA. TY GREENLEES / STAFF

Local News | Updated 35 minutes ago

By India Duke

Dick Penry of Dayton didn’t travel from his home last Memorial Day weekend because of the pandemic, but he expects to be one of expected 1.4 million Ohioans to take a trip this holiday week.

“I didn’t go out last year, but me and my two brothers will travel to Marion to put flowers on our parents’ graves this weekend,” Penry said.

Some travelers have a renewed sense of optimism when it comes to this Memorial Day and look forward to spending more and staying longer on trips as a means to make up for the vacation time the pandemic took away from them, according to AAA. However, 27% of Ohioans said they still will not travel for the holiday, according to a AAA poll.

Penry said having two vaccines has made him feel better about traveling.

“I expect to also take a fishing trip to Michigan in June,” he said.

AAA expects 1.4 million Ohioans to travel over Memorial Day this year representing a return of 86% of those who traveled before the pandemic in 2019, when a record number of Ohioans traveled for the holiday weekend.

The AAA poll also showed that 33% of those looking to travel are interested in a quick retreat.

“Some people are planning those quick getaways and other people are looking to expand their normal travel patterns so we’re seeing longer vacations being booked by some people,” AAA Director of Leisure Travel Micki Dudas said.

ExploreSee the top local high school graduates

The trend is referred to as revenge travel - vacationers extend beyond their typical trip time or budget to make up for lost time. AAA experts expect this to continue throughout most of the summer including Memorial Day weekend.

Dudas said most travelers feel safer traveling by car but should be aware of hike in gas prices.

“We do know there is a correlation between summer fuels and the refineries, but really the shortages that we have heard is really driven by the lack of qualified fleet drivers to deliver gasoline in certain segments of the state,” she said.

Gas prices tend to increase around most major holidays, but with the current shortage in fuel tank drivers, road trippers can expect higher prices at the pump with a state average of $2.89 per gallon for regular fuel, according to GasBuddy, which tracks national gas prices. That price is over $1 more than last year.

Last Memorial Day, gas prices sank to a record setting $1.87 per gallon national average during the pandemic. It had been 17 years since the national gas price average was under $2 per gallon leading into the holiday.

The jump in gas prices won’t stop travelers from taking vacations, Dudas said.

Vaccine distribution is well underway and has restored traveler’s confidence, however, some still have plans to refrain from traveling this summer.

“There are still people that are concerned, and rightfully so about COVID-19. We have seen a correlation of an increase in bookings at AAA based on the roll out of the vaccine,” Dudas aid.

ExploreLt. Gov Husted promotes career tech centers

Earlier this month, Gov. Mike DeWine announced fully vaccinated people can resume activities, including domestic travel at low risk to themselves with proper precautions. About 19% of surveyed Ohioans said that being fully vaccinated was the driving force behind their travel decision, however, 23% of Ohioans said they still have pandemic related travel concerns.

A survey conducted by an Erie, Pa., insurance company revealed those wanting to take road trips this summer have other fears in addition to contracting COVID-19.

“We know a lot of drivers are anxious to travel again as pandemic restrictions begin to lift, so we commissioned this survey to get a glimpse into drivers’ mindsets as they venture back out,” said Jon Bloom, vice president with Erie Insurance in a statement. “Our survey uncovered some concerning behaviors and showed that we need to remain vigilant and keep reminding people that driving is something that requires their full attention. We want everyone to enjoy their road trips and make it home safely.”

With the increase in road travel in Ohio, the Ohio Department of Transportation is working to reduce the size of work zones and remove as many lane closures as possible for the upcoming holiday weekend, but still urge motorists to be mindful when traveling through work zones.

The Ohio State Highway Patrol has its focus on safety belt usage and impaired drivers. Last year, the state reported 20 people were killed in crashes over the holiday weekend, half of whom weren’t wearing a seat belt.

Journal-News.com
Published 6 months ago

Three join Wilmington College Board of Trustees

From left are Wilmington College’s newest trustees: Christen Clougherty, David Raizk and Taylor Stuckert.

Submitted photo

WILMINGTON — The Wilmington College Board of Trustees welcomed three new members at its April meeting — Christen Clougherty, David Raizk and Taylor Stuckert.

Clougherty, of Savannah, Ga., is the founder and executive director of the Nobis Project, a non-profit, educational support organization that focuses on developing educators’ capacity to foster reciprocal and meaningful community partnerships, build culturally responsive classrooms and promote a social justice approach to global service learning.

She received her Ph.D. in Quaker studies from England’s University of Birmingham. She has more than 20 years of experience as an educator and administrator in community organizations, K-12 public, charter and independent schools, and colleges and universities.

Raizk is no stranger to the Board or Wilmington College, as he has more than a half-century affiliation as student, alumnus (‘73), summer theatre co-founder and trustee. He was a board member from 1992 through 2006 and served on three presidential search committees.

The College conferred upon him an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree in 2012. He is general manager at Bill Marine Ford and has served as executive director of Community Improvement Corp. since 2013. A member of Wilmington Friends Meeting, Raizk was mayor of Wilmington from 2000 to 2011.

Stuckert serves as executive director of the Clinton County Regional Planning Commission (CCRPC) and leads planning and development efforts across the county, including its current strategic planning process. He is co-founder of Energize Clinton County, a non-profit organization whose work in collaboration with CCRPC was awarded the 2013 National Planning Achievement Award for Innovation in Economic Planning and Development by the American Planning Assn.

Stuckert is an eighth-generation Clinton Countian and a descendant of Quaker lineage dating back more than three centuries.

WC President Trevor Bates expressed his appreciation for what the new trustees will contribute to the Board going forward.

“As initially evidenced by their participation at the April 2021 board meeting, this trio of new trustees will provide the College with wise counsel drawing upon their respective experiences, education and appreciation for the Wilmington College mission to educate, inspire and prepare students for a life of service and success,” he said. “We welcome each of them to the Board to help enhance our collective efforts to help Wilmington College RISE!”

From left are Wilmington College’s newest trustees: Christen Clougherty, David Raizk and Taylor Stuckert.

Bookmark the permalink.

Wilmington News Journal OH
Published 6 months ago

Clyde seniors graduate with pre-pandemic pomp and circumstance

Staff reports

CLYDE — Looking similar to commencement ceremonies held before the pandemic of 20202, Clyde High School seniors marched out of the school Sunday and around the field at Robert J. Bishop Jr. Stadium while the band played in front of the a stadium whose seats were filled with family and friends.

One-hundred and forty-five seniors marched across the field, some donning masks, and others not.

The class of 2021 then went through the traditional pledge, and valedictorian speeches.

The five valedictorians for the Class of 2021 were Madelyn Andecover, Halle Elder, Taylar Gray, Isabelle Howerton, Madelyn Profitt, and the salutatorian was Emma Strudthoff.

Students took turns crossing the stage to receive their diplomas from Superintendent Dennis Haft and board members as well as Clyde High School officials.

Port Clinton News Herald
Published 6 months ago

Avoid Medical Jargon To Shrink COVID Health Disparities, Say Patient Advocates

Last year, in her first year of medical school at Harvard, Pooja Chandrasheka recruited 175 multilingual health profession students from around the U.S. to create simple and accurate fact sheets about COVID-19 in 40 languages.

Michele Abercrombie for NPR

When cases of COVID-19 began rising in Boston last spring, Pooja Chandrasekhar, then a first year student at Harvard Medical School, worried that easy-to-understand information about the pandemic might not be available in the many languages spoken by clients of The Family Van, the health services and health literacy program where she was working at the time.

So Chandrashekar recruited more than 175 multilingual health profession students from around the U.S. to start the COVID-19 Health Literacy Project. Its aim: Create clear, understandable information about the virus in more than 40 languages, including English. The group's COVID-19 fact sheets, vetted for accuracy and readability by faculty members who speak and read those languages (the first Urdu effort was deemed too formal), were shared with community organizations around the world. They've been downloaded more 250,000 times so far, in over 150 countries.

Each sentence of the fact sheets must be carefully crafted, the volunteers have found, because there is so much room for misunderstanding.

Take for example, the common medical guidance that anyone who thinks they might have COVID-19 should call a doctor.

"Translated incorrectly," Chandrashekar says, "this could be interpreted as 'don't go to the emergency room until you call your doctor — even if you have symptoms of severe illness.' " And that could, in some cases, be a fatal mistake.

The fact sheets produced by Chandrasheka's COVID-19 Health Literacy Project can be read online or printed out as single-page handouts for patients.

Michele Abercrombie for NPR

The sudden global appearance in 2020 of COVID-19, a new and often lethal viral illness, has meant the scientific evidence on what to do to prevent and treat the virus has been changing rapidly. Simply keeping up with the latest understanding and guidance has been especially challenging for a number of groups in the U.S. — people who speak little or no English, many older adults, people with limited education or cognitive skills and really anyone who finds the often-opaque language of health care too difficult to understand, says Michael Wolf. He's a professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine who studies the ways health communication can go wrong.

"Confusion over what a health provider or website is trying to convey can actually lead to misinformation and mistrust of the very things people need to protect themselves," he says.

Problems with health jargon aren't new

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services defines health literacy as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions." By that definition, about 14% of Americans are deemed to have "below basic" health literacy, according to Joseph Dexter, a science data fellow at Harvard University.

Medical jargon has long been a problem, Wolf notes.

"Drug names are typically multisyllabic and difficult to pronounce," he says. "Drugs like acetaminophen often get confused with other drugs, such as amoxicillin, which can make it hard for people to remember which drug they are taking or took previously, when giving a medical history."

Another common problem, he says: "vague instructions on prescription vials." How should one interpret "twice or three times daily" when taking a medicine? Is that over a 12-hour day, or over 24 hours? And how much in each dose?

Many consumers also run into dangerous trouble trying to decipher the labels on nonprescription cold-and-flu medicines and pain relievers.

"Since so many products contain multiple ingredients," Wolf says, "those with low health literacy have been found to be at risk of 'double dipping' — taking two products that each contain acetaminophen or each have an ingredient that causes sleepiness." Those multiple doses can add up to produce dangerous side effects.

In a a review published last August in JAMA Network Open of federal and state web content about the pandemic, Dexter found that content from U.S. government agencies — including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and all 50 states — was often pitched higher than the recommended 8th grade level, making it too hard for millions of Americans to fully understand.

According to the review's authors, the content often exceeded recommendations for the number of words in a sentence, word size, and the use of difficult terms related to public health.

Instead of telling patients that "following safety precautions can reduce food-borne disease transmission," publications that write about food safety should simply say "follow these rules to avoid getting sick," a CDC guide to health literacy advises.

It's also crucial, Chandrashekar notes, that any public health guidance be culturally competent and understood by audiences of different ages.

"Our fact sheets originally recommended that people call 911 if they noticed "bluish lips or face," she says. Volunteers with her literacy project noted such guidance wasn't helpful for many people so they rewrote the language to more accurately describe this symptom of low oxygen levels as "discolored" lips or face, rather than "bluish."

Another project based in Southern California — Translatecovid.org, launched in May 2020 out of the University of California, Los Angeles — also helps people find COVID-19 resources in different languages.

A frequently updated FAQ on the site's home page was crafted by professionals at UCLA's Fielding School of Public Health and translated into more than a dozen languages, including American Sign Language. Anne Pebley, chair of the school's department of community health sciences, notes that nuances in phrasing in each language can have major ramifications in public health.

For example, she points out, the translatecovid.org website deliberately uses the word "mascarilla" as the Spanish term for face mask, while some other public information campaigns use the term "cubreboca." The latter term literally means "covers mouth," but could be misunderstood as implying that the nose need not be covered, Pebley says.

The way the health information is presented visually can be important, too. The COVID-19 health literacy project has now created versions of their fact sheets for kids — with separate ones for preschoolers, grade school students and adolescents.

The page aimed at children ages 3 to 6 calls the coronavirus "a germ that can make people sick."

"We needed to be careful to avoid language that can make young kids fearful or anxious," Chandrashekar explains, "and chose a layout — using friendly animal characters as graphics and bright colors — that would resonate."

The overall effort is making a difference, she says.

"I keep getting emails and letters from people who speak little to no English thanking us for giving them information about the virus they hadn't had before."

Going beyond the printed word

Health literacy initiatives have become even more important in 2021, experts say, with millions of people still unvaccinated against COVID-19, often because they don't understand the information offered or don't know where or how to get the shots.

Dr. Alicia Fernandez, director of the Latinx Center of Excellence at the University of California, San Francisco says she noticed when the vaccine rollout began that many health systems were reaching out to patients via the online portals of their electronic health systems, and that tendency left a lot of people out.

"Health care systems are not set up to be as useful for patients with low health literacy, and the pandemic has exposed that," Fernandez says. "In the last decade, or so, health care systems have relied more and more on patients doing things for themselves — like filling out forms online and accessing test results online rather than getting a call from the doctor."

The solution, she says, might be similar to what happened after airlines introduced self-serve kiosks, instead of relying on representatives to check in passengers and their luggage.

"When the airlines saw so many people having trouble checking their own bags, they added people to help at the kiosks, and that's what we need to do in health care as well."

Vaccine ambassadors

The "No Barriers" program at Stamford Health, a hospital and health care network in Stamford, Conn., is trying to cut through that confusion, working one-on-one, person-to-person to help people in the community get vaccine appointments who might otherwise fall through the cracks.

The program reserves blocks of vaccine time-slots, and has partnered with the city's health department, the local chapter of the NAACP and other local groups to reach community members who need help getting vaccinated, says Ben Wade, a senior vice president for Stamford Health.

Staffers in the program are trained to see themselves as "ambassadors" — and translators, when that's needed — who, along with making vaccine appointments or giving shots also give directions and allay fears. The staff includes health care providers and also transportation aides, who can get people to and from their appointments, if that support's helpful.

Solange Loblack-Durand, one of the people recently vaccinated through the program, says she'd been hearing and reading stories of inaccessible vaccine sign-up websites and crowded non-distanced lines for shots and had been worried about how to schedule and then safely get her shot. So when the human resources department at the small supermarket chain where she works invited her to take a vaccine slot that Stamford Health was offering to the store's employees, "I grabbed it," says a gleeful Loblack-Durand.

When she got to Stamford Hospital for her first vaccine appointment in mid-March, she says, she "felt like a celebrity," after being greeted by an ambassador as she walked in the door. She was escorted to a cubicle where she could ask questions and share her ID privately. After she got her shot, a nurse who was handing out water directed her to the appointment desk to schedule her second shot, and then to an observation area to be sure she had no allergic reaction. Soon another of the volunteer ambassadors cleared her to leave and directed her to the exit. "They took care of it all for me," says Loblack-Durand.

The program originally was scheduling appointments for just one day a week, but has proved so successful in getting people immunized that it has recently been expanded to five days and 400 vaccination slots per week.

So far, the staff's helped more than 3,000 people get COVID-19 shots without having to navigate a website or call a hotline.

Stamford Health's Andie Jodko says additional funding the program received in April will enable it to expand to "focus on a 'door to door' approach in the city to help overcome vaccine hesitancy.

"That's important," says Northwestern's Wolf, "because hesitancy can often be a consequence of low health literacy."

Meanwhile, although telehealth appointments have been a boon to many patients during the pandemic, for others the technology is just one more obstacle to getting care.

"Telehealth visits don't work well if you don't have a computer or enough bandwidth for the video visit, or if you can't speak the same language as the doctor," says Dr. Rakesh Patel, CEO of Neighborhood Healthcare, a network of facilities in Southern California's Riverside and San Diego counties that serve patients regardless of their ability to pay.

Early on in the pandemic, worried that patients at risk for the virus would not be able to come into the clinic for care, Patel's team added the Neighborhood Healthcare logo to a fleet of three cars and loaded them up with medical equipment — including blood pressure cuffs and one online hot spot and tablet per car — so that medical assistants on home visits could help patients talk to physicians if needed.

To make telehealth appointments more equitable in Los Angeles, Anthem Health added two neighborhood Anthem stores that include technology consultation rooms that Anthem members can use for online visits with affiliated physicians. The telehealth visit is set up by store staff on the room's computer, so that patients don't need to have computer skills — they just wait for the doctor to appear on screen.

Federal funding on the rise

We can expect more health literacy projects aimed at easing the pandemic. HHS recently announced $250 million in funding to go to health literacy programs aimed at COVID-19 safety and vaccinations, as part of the American Recovery Act.

"Information is power, especially the ability to understand and use information to support better health," Dr. Felicia Collins, acting assistant secretary for health, said when she announced the funding in March. "Whether it helps us understand where to get tested or the benefits of the COVID-19 vaccine, information is a crucial part of keeping families and communities safe."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

WCBE 90.5 FM - Columbus
Published 6 months ago

NCAA DI Council adjusts transfer waiver guidelines

The NCAA Division I Council has approved new waiver guidelines for student-athletes who aren’t eligible for the one-time transfer exception adopted last month. The new guidelines would apply to anyone who doesn’t meet the criteria for the one-time transfer exception, including students wishing to transfer a second time.

The new guidelines will take effect for student-athletes in January 2022, for those who would be requesting a transfer waiver to compete immediately in 2022-23. Current guidelines will apply for student-athletes seeking a waiver to compete in 2021-22.

In order to compete immediately after a second transfer, a student must meet either the current education-impacting disability guideline or an updated guideline that addresses a “real and imminent health and safety” threat.

The disability guideline requires the transferring student to provide documentation showing that the student-athlete needs support services and/or treatment that was unavailable or inadequate at the previous school but available at the school to which they are transferring.

The health and safety guideline requires schools to provide timely, objective documentation demonstrating that the transfer was due to unique, extenuating and extraordinary circumstances outside the student’s control and caused by an imminent threat to the student’s health or safety.

“These guidelines provide an opportunity for student-athletes with the greatest need to transfer and compete immediately,” said Working Group on Transfers chair and Council vice chair Jon Steinbrecher, commissioner of the Mid-American Conference. “The delayed effective date is the fairest way to accommodate student-athletes who entered the Transfer Portal with the current waiver guidelines in place.”

The current postgraduate transfer waiver process remains in place, and the working group will continue to examine the most appropriate way to address student-athletes who have transferred, graduate and wish to continue their eligibility at another school.

Name, image and likeness

Council members discussed the name, image and likeness proposals currently in the system, including the effective date and potential plan for adoption.

Provided it is feasible to do so, the Council is expected to act on legislative proposals regarding name, image and likeness during its June 22-23 meeting. Having the legislation in place by July 1 would provide greater consistency in the name, image and likeness opportunities available to student-athletes nationally as state laws become effective on or around July 1.

The Council expressed general support for amending the effective date of the proposals from Aug. 1, 2021, to July 1, 2021, or immediately if action is taken after July 1.

Football preseason and prohibited drills

Council members made changes to football preseason practice to protect the health and safety of student-athletes while providing the opportunity to prepare them for the football season. The Division I Football Oversight Committee recommended the adjustments, and they are effective immediately.

The modifications were informed by a number of data points that suggest the preseason practice period may lead to a disproportionate amount of concussions and head impact exposure, including, among others, information from NCAA member conferences, the NCAA injury surveillance program and the NCAA-Department of Defense Concussion Assessment, Research and Education Consortium. The changes include:

• Prohibiting athletic activities, such as drills that encourage or create straight-line contact, as specified in policies and procedures established and maintained by the Division I Football Oversight Committee and the NCAA Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports. This prohibition applies year-round, not just during the preseason.

• Reducing the maximum number of contact practices from 21 to 18 and restricting full-pads days to nine.

• Increasing the acclimatization period from five to seven days.

• Additional limits on full-contact practices, including no more than two consecutive days of full-contact practices, a total of no more than 75 minutes of full contact within any practice session and no more than two scrimmages in the preseason.

Men’s basketball recruiting

Council members also adopted temporary emergency legislation to adjust the men’s basketball recruiting calendar for July 2021. The adjustment established evaluation periods between July 16-18 and July 23-25, while maintaining the originally scheduled evaluation period July 8-11. The change also created a dead period July 19-22. The changes were adopted after the postponement of the 2021 NCAA College Basketball Academy, originally scheduled for July 20-25.

The change is intended to help coaches remain on campus during the week to support current student-athletes and encourage prospective student-athletes to rest in between the evaluation periods on the weekends. Keeping events concentrated on the weekends also helps with travel and logistics for parents and event operators.

The modification is for July 2021 only and will not extend to future years if the College Basketball Academy returns.

Highland County Press
Published 6 months ago

Do "We Buy Houses" Signs Benefit Sellers Or Harm Neighborhoods?

Some investors are flipping houses in distressed neighborhoods [Justin Glanville/ideastream]

You've most likely seen them somewhere around town, the signage, some with handmade lettering announcing "We Buy Houses", or a variation of that.

"We Buy UGLY Houses", "CASH FOR YOUR HOUSE", or "SELL YOUR HOME AS IS"

These signs are becoming more common in this hot real estate market we're seeing now, a market that was good before the pandemic, but actually accelerated with COVID-19 and post COVID demand.

The goal of the sign is usually to obtain the property and quickly flip it. Perhaps to turn it into a rental property, and on the surface, there's nothing wrong with this but like anything in life, bad actors can be involved.

This may lead to predatory behavior and unpaying for a home, and also diminishing property values in a neighborhood.

Today on the program we'll dig into the phenomenon with our Justin Glanville who's been covering the subject, and we'll hear from various other perspectives as well.

Later in the hour we'll look at the implications of The Supreme Court taking up the landmark Roe v. Wade decision.

It was announced Monday of last week that the high court will revisit the case later this year. Jessie Hill from Case Western Reserve University who focuses on reproductive rights and access will be joining us.

Guests:

- Justin Glanville, Reporter and Producer, ideastream
- Lynn Rodemann, Housing Outreach Specialist, Slavic Village Development
- Shalonda Dixon, sold her home to a buyer
- Jessie Hill, JD, Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and Professor of Law at Case Western Reserve University School of Law
- Mahani Teave, Cleveland Institute of Music graduate and classical pianist

Ohio Channel On-Demand Video

State Impact Ohio
Published 6 months ago

NYC mayor: Public schools will be all in person this fall

by Associated Press
Monday, May 24th 2021
AA

FILE — In this March 24, 2021 file photo, Mayor Bill de Blasio, left, and Schools Chancellor Meisha Porter greet a student arriving at Phyl's Academy, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

New York City schools will be all in person this fall with no remote options, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Monday.

"We can't have a full recovery without full-strength schools, everyone back, sitting in those classrooms, kids learning again," de Blasio said on MSNBC's "Morning Joe."

The roughly 1 million students who attend traditional public schools will be in their classrooms with some version of the coronavirus protocols that have been in place in the current academic year, including mask wearing and COVID-19 testing, de Blasio said.

"It's time. It's really time to go full strength now," he said.

After closing schools in March 2020, New York City was one of the first large U.S. cities to reopen school buildings in the fall of that year, but the majority of parents chose online-only learning for their children.

Children and staff members who have been in physical schoolrooms have been randomly tested for COVID-19, and the city has reported very low rates of virus transmission in the schools.

Asked how city education officials could overcome the fears of parents who have thus far chosen online-only learning for their children, de Blasio, a Democrat, said that "a lot of information, a lot of communication” would be the answer.

FILE — In this March 24, 2021 file photo, Melissa Jean reads "The Gruffalo" to her son's pre-K class at Phyl's Academy, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, Pool, File)

He said parents would be invited to visit their children's schools starting in June to get “reacclimated” to the idea of in-person school.

“Anyone who has a question or concern, come into your child’s school. See what’s going on, get the answers," the mayor said.

The announcement comes a week after New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy announced that the state's public schools would open for in-person learning only in the fall.

FILE - In this Monday, April 12, 2021 file photo, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio delivers remarks in Times Square after he toured the grand opening of a Broadway COVID-19 vaccination site intended to jump-start the city's entertainment industry, in New York. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who has clashed with de Blasio throughout the pandemic over who has the right to set COVID-19 rules in New York City schools, has not announced any statewide policy for the 2021-2022 school year.

De Blasio said city schools would be able to accommodate all students under current guidelines from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that call for 3 feet of separation, but he speculated that the standard may be relaxed before the city's public schools open on Sept. 13.

“I think the CDC’ll be changing those rules quite a bit between now and September,” de Blasio said. “But right now in New York City, we could have every child three feet apart, we could make that work if we had to.”

WKRC-TV CBS 12 (Cincinnati)
Published 6 months ago

NYC mayor: Public schools will be all in person this fall

Read More

FILE — In this March 24, 2021 file photo, Mayor Bill de Blasio, left, and Schools Chancellor Meisha Porter greet a student arriving at Phyl's Academy, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

WKRC-TV CBS 12 (Cincinnati)
Published 6 months ago

What is the Biden administration doing to protect infrastructure from cyberattacks?

by ELISSA SALAMY, The National Desk
Monday, May 24th 2021
AA

The National Desk's Angela Brown takes a look at what is being done to protect U.S. infrastructure from cyberattacks. (SBG)

WASHINGTON (SBG) - The Colonial Pipeline hack exposed weaknesses in the nation’s cybersecurity, and some critics say the government isn't doing enough to protect the nation's infrastructure. The White House is pushing its $2 trillion infrastructure plan to upgrade roads, ports, and schools, but some Republicans say what is missing from the bill is the money to protect infrastructure from cyber attacks.

“I do not think that any administration has done nearly enough to recognize the existential threat that our vulnerabilities are, the electrical grid, the fuel grid, and what they really represent to Americans. We need to get serious about this when we are talking about spending trillions of dollars on infrastructure, we ought to focus on hardening our grids,” said Senator Ron Johnson on The National Desk last week.

What is the president’s plan to make our infrastructure more resilient?

“The president's American Jobs Plan does have billions of dollars in resources specifically around resilience and also even in the things that are in the category of transit there's going to be an expectation when grants go out that cybersecurity has been addressed in the plan,” said Pete Buttigieg to The National Desk’s Ahtra Elnashar.

Feeling the pressure to do more, the Biden administration dropped an executive order this month to strengthen federal cybersecurity standards, including more rigorous security requirements for software providers that contract with the federal government.

“When you start connecting everyone to the grid, you have solar panels on houses and they’re connected to the grid, you increase your level of vulnerability. Every day that we move forward with IT technology, we become more and more vulnerable, and we have not gotten better at defending against cyber threats,” said Sen. Johnson.

But the federal government owns very little of American infrastructure. According to the CATO Institute, state and local governments and the private sector own 97% of the nation's non-defense infrastructure, which means the federal government may run into roadblocks - requiring private companies themselves to implement cybersecurity.

WKRC-TV CBS 12 (Cincinnati)
Published 6 months ago

What is the Biden administration doing to protect infrastructure from cyberattacks?

by ELISSA SALAMY, The National Desk
Monday, May 24th 2021
AA

The National Desk's Angela Brown takes a look at what is being done to protect U.S. infrastructure from cyberattacks. (SBG)

WASHINGTON (SBG) - The Colonial Pipeline hack exposed weaknesses in the nation’s cybersecurity, and some critics say the government isn't doing enough to protect the nation's infrastructure. The White House is pushing its $2 trillion infrastructure plan to upgrade roads, ports, and schools, but some Republicans say what is missing from the bill is the money to protect infrastructure from cyber attacks.

“I do not think that any administration has done nearly enough to recognize the existential threat that our vulnerabilities are, the electrical grid, the fuel grid, and what they really represent to Americans. We need to get serious about this when we are talking about spending trillions of dollars on infrastructure, we ought to focus on hardening our grids,” said Senator Ron Johnson on The National Desk last week.

What is the president’s plan to make our infrastructure more resilient?

“The president's American Jobs Plan does have billions of dollars in resources specifically around resilience and also even in the things that are in the category of transit there's going to be an expectation when grants go out that cybersecurity has been addressed in the plan,” said Pete Buttigieg to The National Desk’s Ahtra Elnashar.

Feeling the pressure to do more, the Biden administration dropped an executive order this month to strengthen federal cybersecurity standards, including more rigorous security requirements for software providers that contract with the federal government.

“When you start connecting everyone to the grid, you have solar panels on houses and they’re connected to the grid, you increase your level of vulnerability. Every day that we move forward with IT technology, we become more and more vulnerable, and we have not gotten better at defending against cyber threats,” said Sen. Johnson.

But the federal government owns very little of American infrastructure. According to the CATO Institute, state and local governments and the private sector own 97% of the nation's non-defense infrastructure, which means the federal government may run into roadblocks - requiring private companies themselves to implement cybersecurity.

WNWO NBC-24 Toledo
Published 6 months ago

Notre Dame grad Barron hopes to build off strong season

University of Cincinnati Athletics/Gerry Wall

Notre Dame grad Barron hopes to build off strong season

Just two years into her collegiate career, Notre Dame Academy graduate Ashley Barron has already carved her way into the University of Cincinnati’s women’s soccer history books.

Barron, a defender for Cincinnati, was named the American Athletic Conference defensive player of the year as a sophomore in the 2020-21 season. She’s just the second player in program history to earn first team All-AAC accolades.

“I honestly was just so grateful and so surprised because my teammates are just as deserving of that award [AAC defensive player of the year] as I am,” Barron said in an interview with The Blade. “I work with a great defensive line. So just knowing that the conference saw that potential in me, it was just honestly jaw-dropping. I was just so excited.”

As a freshman, Barron was named to the All-AAC first team and AAC all-rookie team.

Barron was a part of the 2020-21 Bearcats’ back line that ranked fifth in the conference for goals against average (1.24). Barron and Cincinnati’s defense also recorded seven shutouts in 11 games.

“This team defensively is just so relentless,” she said. “They never give up on a play. It's just so exciting being a part of that because it pushes me to be better and try harder for my teammates. And as well as my coach [Neil Stafford], he knows how important defense is to this team and this game.”

For Notre Dame soccer coach Chip Smith, the awards Barron has accumulated in her early college career didn’t come as a surprise.

“Just watching her, you could just tell that she was a different level athlete, different level on the field,” Smith said. “Defensively, watching her when she played with her club team, you could just see that this kid was going to be something else at the next level defensively.”

With Notre Dame, Barron was a two-time United Soccer Coaches all-region selection, three-time All-Ohio first team pick, and four-time All-Three Rivers Athletic Conference selection.

Barron’s four-year varsity career with Notre Dame led to two district player of the year awards and three TRAC player of the year honors.

At Cincinnati, she didn’t hesitate to make an impact for the Bearcats. In her freshman season, Barron was a member of the Bearcats’ back line that had eight shutouts in 19 games.

“I think it shows exactly how talented she is,” Smith said. “I said this after she graduated at our banquet as a coach, you don't get to coach kids like her often. She's sort of a generational, at the high school level, sort of a generational kid. I mean, an All-American, district player of the year, first-team all-state three times.”

In the offseason, Barron said she wants to work on her technical skills and her leadership qualities.

Ahead of the 2020-21 season, Barron was named captain of the Bearcats. She said she wouldn’t describe herself as a vocal leader, but instead leads by example.

But Smith believes Barron being named captain, especially as a sophomore, showcases how good of a teammate she is and the hard-working mentality she brings to the game.

“I think [it] is pretty special. It just it goes back and shows what kind of a person she is, what kind of a teammate she is, what kind of a worker she is,” Smith said. “And I think she, obviously you can see her teammates and her coaches have recognized her with that, too.”

Cincinnati’s regular season was postponed to the spring due to the coronavirus pandemic. The Bearcats finished their schedule 5-5-1 (3-3-1 in the AAC) and third in the conference.

The Bearcats picked up a key win in the semifinals of the AAC tournament, defeating the University of Memphis 1-0 after losing 2-0 during the regular season to a team that was ranked 19th in the nation at one point.

An early goal from freshman midfielder Chloe Spitler was all the Bearcats needed to advance to the AAC championship contest.

“With us getting that goal early from Chloe Spitler, [it] really put us into a mindset where we knew this was our game,” Barron said. “We were in control of it now. And after that, we knew exactly we had to do. We practiced and we talked about it all week, and we executed perfectly.”

The Bearcats lost in the final to the University of South Florida, 4-0. Cincinnati plans to use the loss as motivation for the upcoming fall season.

“It definitely puts a chip on your shoulder, that's for sure,” Barron said. “We are so excited to get back out there and play them again because we didn't come out on top and we didn't really play the best game that we've played, but we knew deep down that we can play with that team.”

Toledo Blade
Published 6 months ago

Rossford distinction award will be given this fall

ROSSFORD – Nominations for the 2021 Rossford High School Award of Distinction, another program put in limbo by the pandemic in 2020, are now being accepted.

The objective of the award is to thank Rossford graduates who have made significant contributions to society.

To qualify, a nominee must have graduated from Rossford High School at least 20 years ago. He or she must be nominated by fellow peers with the final honoree selected by a committee that includes members of the school district and the community.

Nominations must be in the superintendent’s office by June 30.

Superintendent Dan Creps said Rossford Schools said the Award of Distinction program, which began in 2005, has had a rich history of recognizing successful alumni who make positive impacts on society.

Those honored most recently include Sharon Belkofer, a 2019 recipient from the class of 1960, who is a board of education member.

In 2018, Ivory Julian Anderson Jr. received the award. He was recognized for his long service in the military and as an industrial relations representative,

In 2017 the award went to Rossford native Joseph “Moe” Minarcin Jr, who served on the board from 1994-2009 and had four years of service on Rossford Council.

Due to coronavirus restrictions, there was no 2020 award given.

A complete list of awardees includes Charlotte Ransom Starnes and Edward Reiter in 2004, Diane Haas Baker and Gregory Brown in 2005, Dennis Richmond and David Weaks in 2006, James Rossler, Jr. and Duane Tisdale in 2007, Gabrielle Davis and Edward Tucholski in 2008, Marilyn Ziemianski Fox and Louis Durkac in 2009, Mark Wasylyshyn and Thomas Uhler in 2010, Craig LaHote in 2011, Kendra McCamey and Andrew Kostic in 2012, Bradley Goeke and Timothy Mahoney in 2013, Bruce Kostic and Fredrick Wentland in 2014, James Richards in 2015, and Margo Richmond Smith in 2016.

The award ceremony is to be held in the high school auditorium prior to the homecoming football game. Recipients will be recognized for achievements and contributions to society and then presented with tokens of appreciation. Special recognition will also be made at half time of the homecoming football game.

Anyone with questions can contact Lisa Spotts, Rossford Schools administrative assistant to the superintendent and communications liaison, at 419-720-6714 or lspotts@rossfordschools.org.

Bowling Green Sentinel Tribune
Published 6 months ago

Health dept. conducts inspections

Pests were found a Perrysburg fast-food restaurant during a complaint inspection.

The Wood County Health Department inspected Chick-fil-A Restaurant, 10315 Fremont Pike, Perrysburg, on May 12 after receiving a complaint about gluten-free food.

The inspector spoke to the person in charge and conducted a full inspection and found all temperatures correct. Two critical and two non-critical violations were found.

The presence of live insects, rodents and other pests was observed. The inspector found gnats at the prep sink/hand sink area and in the drive-thru area.

The second critical offense was refrigerated, ready-to-eat, temperature-controlled foods not properly date marked (corrected during inspection).

Non-critical were non-food contact surfaces of equipment are unclean (repeat); and cooking equipment or pan surfaces is unclean.

The following inspections were done May 10.

Tender Age Day Care, 1249 Ridgewood Drive, Bowling Green, had one non-critical offense, which was unnecessary medicines and/or improper labeling/storing of medicines. It was corrected during inspection.

Sundae Station, 1240 W. Wooster St., B, Bowling Green, had one non-critical offense, which was non-food contact surfaces of equipment are unclean (repeat).

North Baltimore Custom Cuts, 2545 Insley Road, North Baltimore, had one non-critical offense, which was improper storage of food items (repeat).

Toledo Oil, LTD #10, 1240 W. Wooster St., Bowling Green, had one non-critical offense, which was non-food contact surfaces not easily cleanable.

The following inspections were done May 11.

Dollar Tree Store, 2676 Woodville Road, Northwood, had three non-critical offenses, which included no written procedures for responding to vomiting or diarrheal events at the time of inspection; handwashing sink water below 100°F; and no covered receptacle in women’s restroom at the time of inspection (repeat).

JJ’s Mini Mart, 4101 Woodville Road, Northwood, had two non-critical offenses, which were floors, walls, and/or ceilings not smooth and easily cleanable (repeat); and retail food establishment does not comply with Level One Certification requirements.

During a follow-up inspection, Bowling Green Dairy Queen, 434 E. Wooster St., Bowling Green, had two non-critical offenses, which were in-use utensils improperly stored (repeat, corrected during inspection); and facility not maintained clean.

Papa John’s Pizza, 425 E. Wooster St., Bowling Green, had one critical and four non-critical violations.

Critical was temperature-controlled foods not being cold held at the proper temperature. It was corrected during inspection.

Non-critical were non-food contact surfaces not easily cleanable; non-food contact surfaces of equipment are unclean; physical facilities not maintained in good repair (repeat); and facility not maintained clean.

Guajillo’s, 434 E. Wooster St., C, Bowling Green, had one critical and five non-critical violations.

Critical was improper reheating of food for hot holding. It was corrected during inspection.

Non-critical were employee eating, drinking, or using tobacco in non-designated area (corrected during inspection); food not protected from environmental sources of contamination during preparation; non-food contact surfaces constructed of unapproved materials; physical facilities not maintained in good repair (repeat); and facility not maintained clean.

During a follow-up inspection, Lupita Mexican Taqueria, 425 E. Wooster St., Bowling Green, had one non-critical offense, which was equipment components are not intact, tight or properly adjusted.

The following inspections were done May 12.

Eastwood High School, 4900 Sugar Ridge Road, Pemberville, had one non-critical offense, which was non-durable equipment observed.

Non-critical were non-food contact surfaces of equipment are unclean (repeat) and cooking equipment or pan surfaces unclean.

Sycamore Grove, 1980 Middleton Pike, Luckey, had one critical and one non-critical offense.

Critical was chlorine sanitizing solution at incorrect temperature and/or concentration. It was corrected during inspection.

Non-critical was no sanitizer test kit available.

Luckey Carry Out, 301 Main St., had one non-critical offense, which was equipment not approved by a recognized testing agency (repeat).

Eastwood Elementary, 4700 Sugar Ridge Road, Pemberville, had two critical offenses, which were quaternary ammonium sanitizing solution at incorrect temperature, concentration, and/or water hardness (corrected during inspection); and temperature-controlled foods not being cold held at the proper temperature.

The following inspections were done May 13.

During a follow-up inspection, Biggby Coffee, 26567 N. Dixie Hwy., Suite 133, Perrysburg, had three non-critical offenses, which were facility does not have an employee with manager certification in food protection; single-service and single-use articles not protected from contamination; and facility not maintained clean.

During a follow-up inspection, Barry Bagels, 26611 N. Dixie Hwy., Perrysburg, had one critical and two non-critical offenses.

Critical was handwashing sink not accessible.

Non-critical were non-food contact surfaces of equipment are unclean and facility floor not maintained clean.

The following inspections were done May 14.

Kenwood Elementary, 710 Kenwood Ave., Bowling Green, had one non-critical offense, which was no covered receptacle in women’s restroom (repeat).

Riverby Hills Golf Club (pro), 16571 W. River Road, Bowling Green, had one critical offense, which was equipment food-contact surfaces or utensils are unclean. It was corrected during inspection.

During a follow-up inspection, Baymont by Wyndham, 27441 Helen Drive, Perrysburg, had one non-critical offense, which was no towels or drying device at the handwashing sink(s).

Conneaut Elementary, 542 Haskins Road, Bowling Green, had one non-critical offense, which was nonfood-contact surfaces not easily cleanable (repeat).

Lola’s Yogurt Retreat LLC, 183 S. Main St., Bowling Green, had one critical and five non-critical violations.

Critical was food display not properly protected from contamination by consumers.

Non-critical were improper storage of food items; in-use utensils improperly stored; re-use of single-service or single-use articles; equipment not approved by a recognized testing agency (repeat); and non-food contact surfaces not easily cleanable.

Thrive Childcare, 1134 Professional Drive, Perrysburg, had one critical and two non-critical offenses.

Critical was ready-to-eat, temperature-controlled food not properly discarded when required. It was corrected during inspection.

Non-critical were improper storage of food items; and cutting blocks or boards cannot be effectively cleaned and sanitized.

OR’s Sunoco LLC, 118 N. Findlay St., Haskins, had two non-critical offenses, which were equipment not approved by a recognized testing agency (repeat), and floors, walls, and/or ceilings not smooth and easily cleanable (repeat).

Zero violations were found at Wonderland of Learning LLC, 1235 Ridgewood Drive, Bowling Green; Wonderland of Learning School-Age Center, 1221 Ridgewood Drive, Suite A, Bowling Green; Perrysburg Senior High School, 13385 Roachton Road; Children’s Discovery Center, 11090 Avenue Road, Perrysburg; Hot Head Burritos, 104 E. South Boundary St., Perrysburg; Eastwood Middle School, 4800 Sugar Ridge Road, Pemberville; Fire Lake Campground LLC, 13630 W. Kramer Road, Bowling Green; Comfort Suites, 27450 Helen Drive, Perrysburg; Beeker’s General Store, 226 E. Front St., Pemberville; Anderson Farm, 17653 Otsego Pike, Bowling Green; WCESC Pemberville Preschool, 120 E. College Ave.; Mike and AJ’z Ice Cream Shack, 2 Basic St., Luckey; GLCAP Perrysburg-Rossford Early Childhood Center, 28744 Simmons Road, Perrysburg; Arby’s, 10143 Fremont Pike, Perrysburg; Riverby Hills Golf Club (CH), 16571 W. River Road, Bowling Green; Rita’s Dairy Bar and Deli, 24030 Front St., Grand Rapids; Perrysburg Junior High School, 550 E South Boundary St.; Woodland Elementary, 27979 White Road, Perrysburg; and La Quinta Inn by Wyndham, 1154 Professional Drive, Perrysburg.

Bowling Green Sentinel Tribune
Published 6 months ago

Retiring Perrysburg High School principal honored

Retiring Perrysburg High School Principal Michael Short was honored by past students, staff, politicians and the school board at the Monday board meeting.
Photo by Roger LaPointe/Sentinel-Tribune

PERRYSBURG — Retiring Perrysburg High School Principal Michael Short was honored at last week’s board of education meeting by a list of groups that included past students and state officials.

Proclamations were given to Short from State Sen. Theresa Gavarone, R-Bowling Green; State Rep. Haraz Ghanbari, R-Perrysburg; and Perrysburg Mayor Tom Mackin.

Ghanbari was at the meeting to hand to present the commendation from the Ohio House of Representatives.

“In all of your endeavors you have enthusiastically demonstrated your profound commitment to helping students and without question you have been one of Ohio’s most precious assets and clearly few can rival the depth and duration to your allegiance to education. You have inspired trust and confidence by motivating students and faculty alike,” Ghanbari said.

A recognition plaque, created in the high school STEM lab envisioned by Short, was presented to him by Superintendent Tom Hosler.

“I can tell you that his retirement will leave a hole in our community and with me. Speaking as a superintendent of more than 21 years, Dr. Michael Short is the finest high school principal with whom I’ve had the pleasure of serving. Watching Dr. Short through the years continue to inspire faculty, staff members and students alike to achieve their greatest potential, that there is no doubt in my mind that Perrysburg is a much better place because of him,” Hosler said.

Short was also given an honorary induction into the alumni association by Jeff Abke. He is one of only two alumnus who are not graduates of Perrysburg High School.

The recognition was followed by a video montage presentation presented by Dave Dakolios, assistant principal. It included appreciative messages from students, staff and teachers. The video can be seen at https://youtu.be/nD6RC6-bKMc on the internet.

Bowling Green Sentinel Tribune
Published 6 months ago