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With omicron looming over the holidays, here's how to stay safe

Published December 4, 2021 at 6:00 AM EST

Here we go again.

Just when you thought it was safe to go back to almost normal times, a new, highly mutated variant of the coronavirus has reared its ugly head in the U.S.

Scientists say it's still too soon to know whether the omicron variant causes more or less severe disease, though early evidence does suggest it's better at evading the immune system than previous strains. And, omicron has raised several red flags that suggest it could be the most transmissible variant yet.

All this has many people wondering whether it's time to change our behavior for safety's sake.

The good news is, you don't have to hibernate like it's 2020. Experts note we're in a much different place than we were last winter, with COVID-19 vaccines and boosters now widely available. There's good hope that the current vaccines offer protection against severe disease with omicron.

That said, if this pandemic has taught us anything, it's that when you don't know what you're dealing with, "we should invoke the precautionary principle," says Dr. Abraar Karan, an infectious disease physician at Stanford University.

In other words, don't panic, but do be thoughtful about what risks you want to take.

We spoke to several infectious disease experts for advice on living in the age of omicron. But remember: Things are changing quickly, so stay alert. Public health advice may change as we learn more.

Should I be masking again indoors, even in places where masks are not required?

If you're not vaccinated, mask up indoors — and please, get your shots, experts agree. For the vaccinated, you should be wearing masks if you are at higher risk of severe disease because of your age or underlying health conditions — or if you spend time with people who are vulnerable. We know that vaccines aren't always as protective among older people and the immunocompromised.

"The things that we've gotten tired of doing, we need to keep doing, especially masking up in indoor places," says Dr. Tom Frieden, former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That advice would hold true even without the omicron variant, says Dr. Monica Gandhi, an infectious disease specialist at the University of California, San Francisco, "because we still have [delta] cases circulating in this country."

While you don't generally need to wear a mask outdoors, it makes sense to if you're in a crowd and you don't know the vaccination status of the people around you, said Dr. Julie Vaishampayan, chair of the public health committee of the Infectious Disease Society of America, during a media briefing Thursday.

Do I need to upgrade to N95, KN95 or similar highly protective mask?

While three-ply cloth masks or surgical masks do a good job at preventing the wearer from spreading infectious particles if they fit snugly, and offer the wearer some protection as well, many experts think it would be better to use an N95 or KN95 respirator in crowded indoor public spaces.

This is especially key if you're high risk. "If people around you aren't wearing masks and you are older or you have a weakened immune system, then you should consider upping your mask game and using an N95 mask," says Frieden.

Stanford University's Karan suggests people with other underlying conditions that put them at higher risk — such as obesity, lung disease or poorly controlled diabetes — should also consider upgrading to a high-quality N95 or KN95 mask.

And, if you live with people who are at-risk, consider upgrading your mask as well, Karan says. Double masking with a surgical mask topped by a cloth mask will also boost your protection, notes Gandhi.

Should I cancel my holiday travel plans?

Not necessarily just yet, but do be very thoughtful about them, says Dr. Henry Wu, director of Emory TravelWell Center and an associate professor of infectious diseases at Emory University School of Medicine. "Anyone who's thinking of traveling should pause and consider both your own risk, as well as certain other practical issues about your destination."

For starters, the U.S. is now requiring all travelers entering the U.S. from a foreign country, including Americans returning home, to be tested for the coronavirus no more than one day before departure. If you're in another country, you'll have to make sure you know where to get a test that qualifies within that time frame, which could be a logistical headache.

And remember, the situation on the ground is changing, so keep a watch on the CDC's travel notices. "You certainly want to avoid traveling to countries that are in the midst of a surge and potentially have overwhelmed health systems. You certainly don't want to risk needing to go to an overcrowded hospital if you have your own health problems, COVID or not," Wu says.

Domestic travelers aren't required to test before flying, but it's still a good idea to do so before departure and after arrival — especially if you are visiting someone in a high-risk group. That's what Wu plans to do when he visits his elderly parents in Hawaii next week. "I will, even though it's not required, test myself before my trip and I think I'll bring some self- test kits when I get home, just to be even more sure that I'm not infectious at that time," he says.

If you're unvaccinated, over the age of 65 or have medical conditions that put you at higher risk of severe disease with COVID-19, you should seriously reconsider if now is a good time to travel, Wu says.

And of course, if you do fly or take public transport to your destination, wear a high-quality, snug-fitting mask like an N95 or KN95.

With all the concern that omicron might evade our vaccines, should I bother to get a booster?

The Biden administration came out this week urging people once again to get a booster to help protect against omicron. The recommendation is in line with recent science showing that boosters raise your antibody levels.

A recent preprint study even showed that getting a third dose of the mRNA vaccines could "generate a much broader immune response," says Dr. Kavita Patel, a nonresident fellow at the Brookings Institution and a primary care physician. This could give broader coverage against a variant like omicron she says, "which is why I think you're hearing a number of us, many doctors, public health folks, scientists saying boosters do matter."

Paul Bieniasz is a virologist at Rockefeller University who studies how the immune system response broadens over time, and he concurs. "I'm somebody who's been vaccinated three times, and I think that that's absolutely the right way to go," he says.

"I think anyone who is around immunocompromised individuals should absolutely be ensured that they boost," Gandhi says. "I was actually not going to get a booster because I was protesting global vaccine equity. And I just received one because I need to be around my immunocompromised father."

Is it safe to have a large, indoor social gathering, like a holiday party? Should guests all test in advance?

Safety is important, but so is gathering with loved ones at this time of year, and there are steps you can take to lower the risks for everyone. "What we need to do is add more layers of protection," says Vaishampayan.

First, says Karan, make sure everyone present has gotten a COVID-19 vaccine and booster shot if they're eligible.

If you have access to rapid antigen tests, have your guests take one, especially if they're traveling from other parts of the country. "That's a great way to prevent somebody who is infected from coming in and infecting somebody else," Dr. Carlos Del Rio, an infectious disease specialist at Emory University, told reporters this week.

As Karan notes, "testing is really a snapshot in time," so make sure guests test the day of the actual gathering if at all possible. That's because if a person was just exposed and the virus is still incubating, a person can test negative one day and positive the next.

Rapid antigen tests aren't cheap, however. Even the most inexpensive one will cost you around $12 per test — if you can find one. The Biden Administration this week announced plans to address that: People with private health insurance will now be able to get reimbursed for the cost of at-home tests, and health clinics will offer free tests to the uninsured. In the meantime, if you have to ration, Gandhi suggests prioritizing testing anyone who isn't vaccinated or is vaccinated but showing symptoms.

If the weather allows, it wouldn't hurt to move the party outdoors, says Vaishampayan. At the very least, think about ways to improve ventilation indoors — by opening windows as temperatures allow, for example.

And if you're a guest who's immunocompromised, keep toward well-ventilated areas and mask up unless you're eating or drinking, Gandhi says. Or consider skipping large gatherings, says Karan. "If you have a high risk person at home, this is probably not the time to have a large gathering because vaccines here don't completely stop transmission, they just reduce the chance it can happen," Karan says.

Should I hold off on dining indoors at restaurants?

There's not a clear-cut answer for everyone or every situation, says Wu. "I really just assess each situation individually," he says. You should consider transmission levels in your community, whether there's good ventilation, and most of all, your risk level or that of people you live with or spend time with.

Wu says when he has a social appointment at a restaurant, "I quickly assess how crowded it is, how good is the ventilation, and if it seems risky, and I can pass, I certainly will."

Karan says if you really want to play it safe, skip the indoor dining until scientists know more about omicron. If you do decide to dine indoors, he says get boosted for added protection. But his best advice? "Be conservative right now."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NPR News

WKSU 89.7
Published 17 hours ago

Plain Township's New Home Church adopts infant safety as mission project

Charita M. Goshay
The Repository

PLAIN TWP. – Tina Ramnarine says she'll never forget being part of a "Code Pink" response team tasked with trying to resuscitate a lifeless 2-month-old rushed to Aultman Hospital after the baby had been accidentally smothered while co-sleeping with an adult.

The 20-year nursing veteran has taken up the cause of safe infant sleep as a personal passion and as a faith mission.

Ramnarine is spearheading an effort by the New Home Church to collect donations to purchase Halo SleepSacks to give to families of babies born at Aultman Hospital.

More:Church offering diabetes wellness care in its new location

"Our church has been mission-driven," she said. "I did not realize this church was going to be this generous...I was overwhelmed by the generosity. I didn't know what to say."

New Home Church's SleepSack effort

So far, the nondenominational church co-founded by Benny and Suzanne Griffiths in 2018 has raised $10,800, which it has used to purchase 1,500 SleepSacks.

That's halfway to the church's goal of $20,000.

"What this stemmed from, our church being a small church, we do a lot of mission outreach work," Suzanne Griffiths said.

Griffiths, a lifelong early-childhood educator, said the project fits in perfectly with the church's purpose.

"It takes a village, it really does," she said.

Taking on unsafe sleeping practices in Stark County

Ramnarine, who has worked in pediatrics, neonatology, and the birthing center at Aultman, noted that every three days, a baby in Ohio dies from unsafe sleeping or SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome). Stark County is one of the top three counties for unsafe sleeping.

"The goal is babies sleeping on their backs," she said.

The SleepSack makes that possible for infants too young to roll over by "swaddling" them in place.

Ramnarine said the push to place infants on their backs to sleep emerged in the mid-1990s, which resulted in a correlation in the decline of SIDS-related deaths.

Benny Griffiths, the church's lay leader and a retired Massillon City Schools educator, said the New Home Church is inspired by Jesus' words in Matthew 25:40 compelling believers to care for "the least of these."

"Our church has focused all of its efforts on meeting the needs of children and students," said Griffiths, who noted that the New Home Church has also donated to AIM Academy and Canton Calvary Mission. "We have a saying a New Home Church, 'We are blessed to be a blessing.'"

Ramnarine said that approximately half of the 2,700 babies born at Aultman every year are born to low-income families who can't always afford to buy a SleepSack, which costs about $22.

The goal, she said, is for every baby discharged to go home in a SleepSack, "and hopefully educate and raise awareness in our community."

The church is seeking $1,000 in donations from 10 large churches.

The Aultman Foundation also has lent its support to the mission.

"These are the smallest, most vulnerable members of our community," Ramnarine said. "If I can send parents home with something that helps their baby, I've reached my goal."

To donate, checks may be sent to Ramnarine with "Safe Sleep" in the memo and mailed to 3442 Enfield Ave. NW Canton, OH, 44708, or visit:

aultmanfoundation.org/home/giving/choose-your-good/safe-sleep/

Reach Charita at 330-580-8313 or charita.goshay@cantonrep.com

On Twitter: @cgoshayREP

Alliance Review
Published 17 hours ago

Public Record: Dec. 4

Dec 04, 2021 5:00 AM

Docket

From the public records of the Findlay Police Department and the Hancock County Sheriff's Office:

Police Department

The following incidents were reported Thursday:

A man was reportedly dumpster diving on Crystal Glen Boulevard.

One person was taken into custody following a traffic stop on West Lincoln Street.

Harassment occurred at a West Trenton Avenue business.

Theft was reported at a Midland Avenue residence.

A fight occurred in the 700 block of Davis Street.

A hit-skip accident occurred near Jennifer Lane.

A hit-skip accident also occurred on Tiffin Avenue.

Child neglect was reported on Tiffin Avenue.

Officers conducted a drug investigation at a North Main Street bank. An employee reportedly found drugs in a safety deposit box.

Three people were taken into custody after a report of shoplifting at Walmart, 1161 W. Trenton Ave.

Suspicious activity was reported at Dorney Plaza and on Jefferson and Park streets.

A man was reportedly throwing objects and screaming on Deer Valley Lane.

A South West Street resident reported property damage. She said her outdoor decorations were being tampered with.

Fraud was reported in the 100 block of Alpine Drive and in the 400 block of Rosewood Avenue.

An employee reported harassment by a coworker at KFC, 700 W. Trenton Ave.

A student reported that their phone was stolen while they were in school.

Harassment occurred at an East Sandusky Street residence.

A West Trenton Avenue woman received harassing phone calls.

An unruly juvenile was taken into custody for assaulting and throwing objects at a Sawmill Road resident.

Sheriff's Office

The following incidents were reported Thursday:

Hit-skip accidents were reported on Edgewood Drive and County Road 212.

A phone was reportedly stolen out of a package on Commerce Parkway.

A car was keyed on North Main Street, Arlington.

A hit-skip accident involving a mailbox was reported near county roads 236 and 18.

A man reported that a neighbor's dog took a package off the porch of his residence on Township Road 209, Alvada.

Suspicious activity was reported by a County Road 216 resident.

Findlay Courier
Published 17 hours ago

New book examines history of University of Mount Union

Paige Bennett
The Repository

ALLIANCE – Harry Paidas didn't just write a book about the most important moments in the last 25 years of the University of Mount Union's history.

He was usually in the room when they happened.

The 69-year-old, who graduated from the university in 1974, spent 33 years working at Mount Union, where he held the positions of chief public relations officer, director of the Regula Center for Public Service and Civic Engagement, and faculty member in the department of communication.

More:No trick: Mount Union treat event raise record food donation

More:Area college: Mount Union's Braedon Poole named OAC Men's Basketball Player of the Week

In the summer of 2020, President Thomas Botzman asked Paidas to author a book detailing major events that took place at Mount Union since 1996 in light of the university's 175th anniversary this year.

Professor Emeritus Bill Coleman and Dodie Davis, former director of alumni engagement, were asked by Botzman to serve as editors.

"It was really helpful to know the background of some of the decisions that were made having been there and knowing the presidents as well as I did," Paidas said.

His book, entitled "Make the Echoes Roll," will be released sometime in the coming months. It is the third work to be written about the university's history and is preceded by "Wake the Echoes" by John Saffell and "A Select School: The History of Mount Union College" by Newell Yost Osborne.

Ryan Smith, director of academic marketing at Mount Union, said in an email that no date has been set for the release of the book, which is being published by the school. The cost and details about how to purchase a copy are expected to be announced later.

"Make the Echoes Roll" highlights different aspects of Mount Union's recent history, including the decisions of university presidents, the success of the football program and how the implementation of new majors and programs shaped the institution.

"Because I lived it, I still had recollections of what happened during those 25 years and what the important points were in that timeframe, so I just started writing," Paidas said. "My background is that I was an undergraduate English major, and I have a master's in journalism."

After Paidas wrote about the history he could recall from memory, he went through his work and identified places where he needed to find sources to support the information. He consulted old copies of Mount Union's alumni magazine and student newspaper, notes from various council and board meetings, and interviewed people who were present at the time.

The book's chapters are divided by presidential terms. Additionally, the book includes a section focused on the university's athletic programs.

"I don't think anybody's going to realize how significant (football) has been until maybe this dynasty ends. This rise in football created such a positive atmosphere at Mount Union in many ways," Paidas said.

Mount Union's football program has seen tremendous success since the early 1990s. The Purple Raiders have won 13 national championships since 1993.

The success of the program, Paidas said, put a national spotlight on the university, helping increase student enrollment and draw attention to the university's academic programs. The liberal arts school has about 2,100 students.

Paidas also said the university expanded its offerings in the 2000s to incorporate more math and medicine-oriented programs.

"That really changed the face of the institution," he said. "In fact, this kind of shocked me as I wrote this, the No. 1 major at Mount Union currently did not even exist in 2013, and that was nursing."

Paidas anticipates the book will be sent to the printer sometime this holiday season and hopes it will be available for purchase soon after.

Reach Paige at 330-580-8577 or pmbennett@gannett.com, or on Twitter at @paigembenn.

Canton Repository
Published 17 hours ago

News Briefs: Women's Connection to meet Dec. 14

News-Messenger/News Herald

USA Today Network

Women's Connection to meet Dec. 14

Fremont Area Women’s Connection will meet 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Dec. 14 at Crystal Arbors Catering, 1800 E. State St. (next to Big Lots).

All women are invited to attend the “Feliz Navidad” luncheon and enjoy the program that will include music and sing -along with the Harvest Amigos.

Guest speaker is Sandi Lemmon from Toledo who will share the topic of “Reviving the Dying Art of Conversation.” Cost of the luncheon is $14, and reservations are needed by Dec. 9 by calling or texting Donna at 419-680-2251 or emailing Carrol at fawcluncheon@gmail.com. Reservations as well as any cancellations must be reported in the same way.

Free Christmas Day dinner set at Holy Assumption

MARBLEHEAD — The Holy Assumption Orthodox Church, 110 E. Main St., will hold a free Christmas Day Dinner 1-4 p.m. Dec. 25. Reservations are requested by 8 p.m. Dec. 19, although not required. Call the rectory at 419-798-4591 and specify eat in or take out.

Humane Society seeks donations during holiday season

PORT CLINTON —The Humane Society of Ottawa County has placed a Giving Tree in three locations for anyone wishing to donate to the Humane Society over the Christmas holiday. Trees are located at Miller's New Market, 22361 W. Holt Harrigan Road, Genoa; Bassett's Market, 3994 E. Harbor Road, Port Clinton; and The Lake House, 3874 E. Harbor Light Landing Drive, Port Clinton.

These 6-foot Christmas trees have paper ornaments with items listed that are needed at the shelter. Shoppers take an ornament off the tree, purchase the item and return it to the store. A box is provided with the tree for these items. Items needed include dog and cat food, cleaning supplies, toys and gas cards.

Some ornaments list monetary donations to pay for a dog or cat spay/neuter, veterinary tests, vaccinations, or adoption fees. These monetary donations can be mailed to the Humane Society using a self-addressed envelope that is attached to the ornament.

Port Clinton school board plans 2020 organizational meeting

PORT CLINTON — The Port Clinton City School Board of Education will hold its organizational meeting and regular meeting at 5 p.m. Jan. 10, in the board conference room, 811 Jefferson St.

Fremont News-Messenger
Published 17 hours ago

‘She Leads, She Learns’ Guides Girls into Professional Careers

BRIDGEVILLE, Pa. — BeNeca Griffin began her career as an intern at 16 years old, working her way to vice president of three television companies in Los Angeles – eventually becoming the CEO of Moments of Focus LLC.

She helps clients focus on the purpose and positioning of their corporate, small business, professional and personal brands through branding and leadership development services, books and keynote speeches.

Griffin will take part in Junior Achievement of Western Pennsylvania’s initial She Leads, She Learns program next year, helping high-school aged girls discover their passions, potential and power. She Leads will start with a virtual “Intern to VP” professional branding and leadership development training program through four Saturday sessions in February and March. Griffin’s Empower Her summit will be April 2 in Pittsburgh.

At the She Leads program, Griffin will help 50 candidates identify their goals and develop action plans, pre-qualify for their future opportunities, understand the truth behind the interview process, improve their communication skills and get on the executive track of their field. Submissions for the program were completed on Dec. 1.

“One thing for young girls is we develop their professional scripts,” she says. “We help people figure out what they should be saying, what their brand represents and how they say it.

“It’s on-the-spot consulting services at the same time.”

There is no cost for those attending this session. Local corporations have invested in the program, with more possibly joining the effort, says Patrice Matamoros, president of Junior Achievement of Western Pennsylvania.

The Empower Her summit location has yet to be determined, but Matamoros is leaning toward having it at a nearby university. The cost of staging it is around $50,000, she says.

The more funding JA receives, the more classes and outreach it can offer, Matamoros says. Companies wanting to donate to the project can click HERE, call the office at 412 208 4747 or email Matamoros HERE.

“This is something that’s going to grow year after year,” Matamoros says. “Our first year growth is out of the ballpark at this point, but it shows us the need there is in the region.”

Griffin says the girls will get a 10-year head start on their careers, giving them the ability to network properly and understand themselves.

The process begins in high school with internships – not waiting until the student is in college.

“By the time you get into college, if you don’t have an inkling of understanding of who you are, then you’re behind and start feeling stressed,” she says.

The program is about growing leaders, helping them to understand how they can lead and be comfortable in whatever field they choose, Griffin says.

“We’re excited to help them at this stage so we can set them on fire and grow,” she says.

Matamoros is excited to launch the venture, which will gather many women executives and CEOs from all walks of life. Applications for the program closed Dec. 1.

“That community of leaders will help younger girls identify what they want to do or maybe see something they never knew even existed because of what the women bring to the table,” she says.

Matamoros was the former CEO of P3R, a Pittsburgh-based nonprofit organization that promoted community health and fitness through events, races and education programs – including the Pittsburgh Marathon. She grew that event by more than 360%. More than 80,000 runners participate in P3R events, while the nonprofit has an annual budget of $8 million.

Her goal is to expand the Junior Achievement of Western Pennsylvania effort in the same fashion.

“I’d like to grow it into a large-scale event that is an asset to our region,” Matamoros says.

Copyright 2021 The Business Journal, Youngstown, Ohio.

Youngstown Business Journal Daily
Published 17 hours ago

Recount of Newark School Board votes confirms tie, Christenberry win

Kent Mallett
Newark Advocate

NEWARK — A hand recount of votes for Newark School Board matched the computer-tabulation of ballots, leaving candidates Mark Christenberry and John Ault tied, but giving Christenberry the victory by virtue of last week’s coin toss.

The Licking County Board of Elections announced the recount results Thursday, showing Christenberry and Ault still even with 2,153 votes each for the second and last elected position in the Nov. 2 general election.

Incumbent Mike Blowers was the top vote-getter with 2,891 votes and Jamie Holderman was fourth with 2,123 votes, just 30 behind the two tied candidates.

Ault trailed Christenberry by 17 votes in the election night results, but the addition of absentee, provisional and paper ballots provdided Ault with 38 additional votes, compared to 21 more for Christenberry, creating the tie.

Christenberry, a former school board member, won a coin flip last week when he was assigned "tails" and the coin landed on "tails." Neither candidate was invited to attend the coin toss. A tie vote can be decided in other was, such as picking a card or picking a name out of a hat, but the board opted for the coin toss.

“I know all of them (on the elections board) and I trust them and I guess I don’t know another way," Christenberry said. "The more options you have, the more you’re open for issues. A coin toss is one or the other.”

The Hanover mayoral election in 2013, also a tie vote, was decided by a card draw. Chad Waters drew a 9 of diamonds from a deck of cards and Nicole Gieseler pulled a five of spades to determine the winner.

The local elections board has been good about helping candidates navigate all the election filings and procedures, Christenberry said.

“They’ve always been good to people and always want to help people run," Christenberry said. "I appreciate the attitude. I assume other counties are not nearly as easy to deal with.”

Christenberry, who served on the school board from 2008-11, joins Blowers, Tom Bline, Tim Carr and Warren Weber on the board in January. Board of Education president Beverly Niccum did not seek another term. Christenberry said the school district is in a very different position than during his previous term.

“It’s going to be way different because at that time we were cutting 40 to 50 jobs because of money and building all new schools, and we have none of that on our plate now," Christenberry said. "We’re in a way different place.”

kmallett@newarkadvocate.com

740-973-4539

Twitter: @kmallett1958

Newark Advocate
Published 17 hours ago

Public meetings for Dec. 6-11

Dec 04, 2021 5:00 AM

Monday

Brunswick Board of Education, work session, 6:30 p.m., board office, 3643 Center Road.

Liverpool Township Board of Zoning Appeals, public hearing, 7 p.m., Liverpool Community Center, 6801 School St.

Medina Board of Education, work session, 6 p.m. — canceled.

Medina County Public Hearing, discussion of Senate Bill 52, 6 p.m., administration building in commissioner’s hearing room, 144 N. Broadway St.

Montville Board of Zoning Appeals, regular meeting, 7 p.m., administration building, 6665 Wadsworth Road.

Village of Seville Board of Public Affairs Council Utilities Committee, 6:45 p.m., followed by government committee at 7 p.m. or five minutes after BOPA, followed by finance committee at 7:15 p.m. or five minutes after government, council room, 120 Royal Crest Drive.

Wadsworth Board of Control, regular meeting, 1:30 p.m., administration conference room at city hall, 120 Maple St.

Wadsworth Economic Development and Planning Committee, regular meeting, 5 p.m., followed by public ways committee at 5:30 p.m., followed by Board of Zoning Appeals at 7 p.m., council chambers, 120 Maple St.

Wadsworth Senior Citizens’ Commission, regular meeting, 3:30 p.m., Soprema Senior Center, 617 School Drive.

Westfield Fire & Rescue Department and Westfield Township Trustees, regular meeting, 6:30 p.m., Join Zoom meeting at bit.ly/3GgCIi3, meeting ID: 883 4390 8591, Join by phone: (646) 558-8656.

Tuesday

Guilford Township trustees, regular meeting, 8 p.m., township hall, 3800 Greenwich Road.

Granger Township trustees, special meeting to hold executive meeting, 6:15 p.m., administration building, 3717 Ridge Road.

Granger Township Zoning Commission, regular meeting, 7 p.m., administration building, 3717 Ridge Road.

Hinckley Township Trustees, regular meeting, 6:30 p.m., administration building, 1410 Ridge Road, Zoom option at hinckleytwp.org.

Lafayette Township Board of Zoning Appeals, continuing public hearing regarding setback requirement, 6 p.m., Lafayette Township Safety Services Building, 6367 Technology Lane.

Medina Board of Control, special meeting to discuss sick leave, 11:30 a.m., administration building in the Mayor's Conference Room, 132 N. Elmwood Ave.

Medina Cemetery Commission, regular meeting, 1 p.m., Amo Mears Building, 775 E. Washington St.

Medina County Board of Elections, audit of Nov. 2 general election, 9 a.m., Board of Elections, 3800 Stonegate Drive, Suite C

Medina County commissioners, regular meeting, 9:30 a.m. (facebook.com/MedinaCountyCommissioners).

Montville Township trustees, regular meeting, 7 p.m., administration building, 6665 Wadsworth Road.

Spencer Township trustees, regular meeting, 7 p.m., township office, 110 N. Main St.

Wadsworth Public Service Committee, regular meeting, 4:30 p.m., followed by committee of the whole/finance at 5 p.m., council chambers, 120 Maple St.

Wadsworth City Council, regular meeting and a joint meeting with Wadsworth Township trustees to elect a member of the Woodlawn Cemetery Board, 6 p.m., council chambers, 120 Maple St., (Live on CityLink channels 17 and 329 at scheduled times and on Spectrum channel 1024. It will also be livestreamed at WatchWCTV.com).

Westfield Center Council, regular meeting, 7 p.m., municipal building, 6701 Greenwich Road.

Wednesday

Hinckley Board of Appeals, regular meeting, 7 p.m., administration building, 1410 Ridge Road, Zoom option at hinckleytwp.org.

Medina County Community Improvement Board, 4 p.m., administration building in Balcony Room B, 144 N. Broadway St.

Montville Zoning Commission, regular meeting, 7 p.m., administration building, 6665 Wadsworth Road.

Lodi Board of Public Affairs, regular meeting, 6 p.m., village hall, 110 Ainsworth St.

Thursday

Guilford Township Zoning Commission, regular meeting, 8 p.m., township hall, 3800 Greenwich Road.

Harrisville Township Zoning Commission, 7 p.m., township hall, 209 Railroad St.

Medina County Advisory Council on Aging & Disability, regular meeting, 12 p.m., Office for Older Adults, 246 Northland Drive.

Medina County Data Board, regular meeting, 8:30 a.m., engineering center in front conference room, 791 W. Smith Road.

Medina County Health Department Health Center Co-Applicant Board, regular meeting, 11:30 a.m., Medina County Health Department, 4800 Ledgewood Drive.

Medina Historic Preservation Board, regular meeting, 5 p.m., followed by the planning commission, 6:30 p.m., followed by Board of Zoning Appeals at 7:30 p.m., multipurpose room, city hall, 132 N. Elmwood Ave.

Medina Rec. Center Advisory Board, regular meeting, 7:30 a.m., recreation center, 855 Weymouth Road.

Medina Township trustees, regular meeting, 7 p.m., township hall, 3799 Huffman Road.

Montville Township Board of Trustees, Zoning Appeals and Zoning Commission, special joint meeting related to a comprehensive plan, 6:30 p.m., administration and safety services center, 6665 Wadsworth Road.

Veterans Service Commission, regular meeting, 4 p.m., Veterans Office, 210 Northland Drive.

York Township Board of Zoning Appeals, regular meeting, 7 p.m., fire station complex, 6609 Norwalk Road.

Friday

Cloverleaf Local School District Finance Committee, regular meeting, 9 a.m., Cloverleaf High School Board Office, 8525 Friendsville Road.

Educational Service Center of Medina County Governing Board, regular meeting, 5:30 p.m., 124 W. Washington St.

Sealed Bid Opening, construction of the Medina County Sanitary Sewer Rehabilitation Project, 1:30 p.m., engineering center, 791 W. Smith Road

Saturday

Medina Township trustees, special meeting to discuss temporary budget, 2 p.m., township hall, 3799 Huffman Road.

Medina County Gazette
Published 17 hours ago

News roundup for Dec. 4

Dec 04, 2021 5:00 AM

Seniors named Students of the Month at Medina, Medina County Career Center and Highland

• Medina High School senior Zachary Bohmer has been named December Student of the Month. Bohmer has earned the Medina High School Academic Distinction Award Magna Cum Laude his freshman and junior years and Summa Cum Laude his sophomore year. He is a member of the National Honor Society, HUDDLE, Key Club, VOFT and Junior Leadership Medina County. He is also a part of the Medina High School cross country, swim and track teams, lettering in all three. He is also a volunteer in the Joyce B. Ebner Tutoring Center as a peer tutor. After graduation, he plans to attend college to major in mechanical engineering.

• Cloverleaf senior Laurell Brown has been selected as the Medina County Kiwanis November Student of the Month for the Medina County Career Center by a panel of her peers. Brown is a senior in the cosmetology program and is the president of her class. Her volunteer activities include Operation Homes and watching children during church. She currently teaches a women’s self-defense class. At Cloverleaf High School, she is a part of the Chatter Club, was in the marching band for two years, ran track for two years and has played basketball for four, where she has lettered and named Player of the Game. She has been on the honor roll all through high school and was inducted into the National Technical Honor Society as a junior. After graduating, she plans to attend a four-year college and play collegiate basketball.

• Highland High School senior Jordan Yu has been selected as the Medina County Kiwanis Student of the Month for November. Yu serves as a peer leader, a D.A.R.E. role model, and a member of the National Honor Society, Highland Marching Band, and swim and track teams. He has also participated in several musical productions. Yu has volunteered his time at the Highland Safety Town Program, Ohio Special Olympics and as a 4-H Camp counselor. Once graduating, he plans to attend college.

New and continuing road impacts in Medina County

State Route 3 from north of Fenn Road to south of Odessa Road will have single-lane closures for resurfacing work. Traffic will be maintained by flaggers, with estimated completion for this month.

Interstate 271 from the Summit County line to Interstate 71 will have daily single-lane closures for a pavement repair project. Traffic will be maintained in 11-foot lanes. The estimated completion is this month.

State Route 18

• Crews will be paving the top course of asphalt for the temporary pavement along state Route 18 from the Cleveland Clinic to Foote Road and at the state Route 18/River Styx intersection, approximately Monday through Wednesday. The temporary signals at both of Cleveland Clinic’s signalized driveways will be turned on and crews will be removing the existing signals.

• State Route 18 west of Alber Drive to Nettleton Road will have single-lane closures as crews widen and rebuild the roadway.

• Crews will continue to work at the corner of state Route 18 and River Styx Road by Goodwill. Most of the work will be off the roadway, but single-lane closures will occur when needed.

• The right turn lane on state Route 18 east in front of Summa Health Medical Center is closed and daily eastbound lane closures should be expected.

• State Route 18 at the Windfall Road intersection will have lane closures for intersection improvements and paving. The traffic on Windfall Road will be maintained by flaggers when necessary. An 11-foot minimum will be maintained on Route 18 and a 10-foot minimum will be maintained on Windfall Road. This is part of the intersection improvement project along Route 18 from Windfall Road to the Medina County line, which will be completed in August 2022.

State Route 57

• Starting Monday, Lester Road south of the intersection of Lester Road and state Route 57 will be closed for necessary repairs. The detour route for southbound motorists is Lester Road to state Route 57/Spieth Road, east on state Route 57/Spieth Road to state Route 252, south on state Route 252 to state Route 18, west on state Route 18 to Lester Road and reverse for northbound motorists. The estimated completion is Wednesday.

• On Thursday, state Route 57 from Lester Road to the roundabout (west leg of the roundabout) will close for 69 days for necessary repairs. The detour route for northbound motorists is state Route 57 to state Route 18, west on state Route 18 to state Route 83, north on state Route 83 to state Route 57 and reverse for southbound motorists. The estimated completion is Feb. 16.

• State Route 57/state Route 252 just south of the state Route 57/Spieth Road roundabout will close Feb. 16 for 14 days of necessary repairs. The detour route for northbound motorists will be state Route 57/state Route 252 to state Route 18, west on state Route 18 to state Route 83, north on state Route 83 to state Route 303, east on state Route 303 to state Route 252 and reverse for southbound motorists. The estimated completion is March 2.

• Spieth Road just east of the state Route 57/Speith Road roundabout will close March 2 for seven days for necessary repairs. Spieth Road will be open to westbound-only traffic. The detour route for eastbound motorists will be state Route 57/Spieth Road to state Route 252, south on state Route 252 to state Route 18, east on state Route 18 to Abbeyville Road and north on Abbeyville Road to Spieth Road. The estimated completion is March 9.

3 receive Patriot Award from U.S. Defense Department

David Lariviere, Timothy Dimoff and Thomas Still of SACS Consulting & Investigative Services Inc. received a Patriot Award from the U.S. Department of Defense for contributing to national security and protecting liberty and freedom by supporting employee participation in America's National Guard and Reserve Force.

The Patriot Award reflects the efforts made to support citizens through a wide range of measures, including flexible schedules, time off before and after deployment, caring for families and granting leaves of absence if needed.

SACS, with headquarters in Akron, is a team of international experts in the high-risk HR field, including corporate surveillance and protection, security training, hostile shooter protocols, COVID-19 testing and crisis management consulting.

Holiday open houses at museums Sunday

•The Medina County Historical Society will have a holiday tour at the McDowell-Phillips House Museum at 205 S. Prospect St. from 1-4 p.m. Sunday.

This will be a guided tour of eight people starting every 20 minutes. No reservations, and it is first come, first served.

Admission donation is adults, $10; MCHS members and seniors, $9; students ages 7-18, $7; and children under 7 with a hand-holding adult, free. Legal parking is available on nearby streets, but do not park on Blake Avenue.

• The Medina County Historical Society also will have a holiday open house at the John Smart House Museum, 206 N. Elmwood St. from 1-4 p.m. Sunday.

This will be a self-guided tour of the home. There will be docents throughout the museum to answer questions and give facts.

Admission donation prices will be $5 for adults, $4 for seniors and MCHS members, $3 for students ages 7-18 and those under 7 are free with a hand-holding adult.

Email MCHS@zoominternet.net or call (330) 722-1341 with any questions.

It's officially time to license your dog

The 2022 dog licenses have been on sale since Wednesday and will be sold through Jan. 31.

All dogs that are more than three months old must be licensed. After Jan. 31, applications are subject to a late penalty.

Licenses can be purchased for $14 for a year, approximately $45 for three years and approximately $145 permanently. To learn more, visit bit.ly/3Gca4hX.

— from staff reports

Medina County Gazette
Published 17 hours ago

New COVID cases for students continue to increase throughout the county

Dec 04, 2021 5:00 AM

After seeing a decline in the number of positive coronavirus cases in Medina County school districts, those numbers have begun to increase, according to Ohio Department of Health data.

The data is collected from all of the schools for both students and teachers and then is broken up into categories, such as new student cases, cumulative student cases, new teacher cases and cumulative teacher cases.

A total of 1,703 school districts reported the number of new cases for the student population.

During the week of Nov. 21-27, Brunswick City Schools led Medina County with the highest ranking at No. 11 throughout the state with a total of 31 new student positive cases.

“I'm not surprised,” Superintendent Jason Niedermeyer said. "I've seen a pretty steady increase in numbers.”

Earlier in the year, the district had dropped to as low as nine new positive cases in a week.

With 430 cumulative cases throughout the year, the district is ranked at No. 15 for the state for that category.

“We're trending in the wrong direction, which is not good to see but we're hoping that this trend will decrease here shortly,” Niedermeyer said.

He said he is often comparing the district’s data to the county and the state. In addition, Niedermeyer looks at what the trends were like at this time in 2020.

According to Niedermeyer, from September through December 2020, there was a peak.

“That same kind of trend is happening right now across the county,” he said.

Medina City Schools is currently ranked No. 39 for the state, with a total of 19 new cases within the week.

At the beginning of the year, the district was in the top 10 for cumulative cases but has since dropped to No. 14 in the state with a total of 440 cases.

As of Friday, Heritage and Northrup elementary schools were currently under a mask mandate until Dec. 10. Beginning Monday, Waite Elementary School will be placed on a two-week mandate.

Wadsworth City Schools has seen an increase in the number of cases throughout the district. At the end of October, the district was ranked No. 323 throughout the state for new student cases. Since then, it has jumped to No. 41 with 18 cases.

Cumulatively, the district is ranked No. 33 with a total of 337 student cases.

Cloverleaf Schools is currently No. 71 throughout the state for new student cases, with a total of 13 cases. The district is ranked No. 72 for the student cumulative cases with a total of 228 cases.

In early October, the district created a mask mandate based on a threshold placing. If a building would reach 6 percent of COVID-19 cases and quarantines combined for three consecutive days, the building would then be placed on a mask mandate for 10 days. After the 10 days, if the building dropped to 4 percent or lower, the mask mandate would be lifted.

At one point in November, all three buildings were on a mask mandate.

“The rationale for it was that we wanted to do everything we can to ensure that we're not faced with having to consider remote instruction again,” Superintendent Daryl Kubilus said.

Medina County Gazette
Published 17 hours ago

News Briefs: Women's Connection to meet Dec. 14

News-Messenger/News Herald

USA Today Network

Women's Connection to meet Dec. 14

Fremont Area Women’s Connection will meet 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Dec. 14 at Crystal Arbors Catering, 1800 E. State St. (next to Big Lots).

All women are invited to attend the “Feliz Navidad” luncheon and enjoy the program that will include music and sing -along with the Harvest Amigos.

Guest speaker is Sandi Lemmon from Toledo who will share the topic of “Reviving the Dying Art of Conversation.” Cost of the luncheon is $14, and reservations are needed by Dec. 9 by calling or texting Donna at 419-680-2251 or emailing Carrol at fawcluncheon@gmail.com. Reservations as well as any cancellations must be reported in the same way.

Free Christmas Day dinner set at Holy Assumption

MARBLEHEAD — The Holy Assumption Orthodox Church, 110 E. Main St., will hold a free Christmas Day Dinner 1-4 p.m. Dec. 25. Reservations are requested by 8 p.m. Dec. 19, although not required. Call the rectory at 419-798-4591 and specify eat in or take out.

Humane Society seeks donations during holiday season

PORT CLINTON —The Humane Society of Ottawa County has placed a Giving Tree in three locations for anyone wishing to donate to the Humane Society over the Christmas holiday. Trees are located at Miller's New Market, 22361 W. Holt Harrigan Road, Genoa; Bassett's Market, 3994 E. Harbor Road, Port Clinton; and The Lake House, 3874 E. Harbor Light Landing Drive, Port Clinton.

These 6-foot Christmas trees have paper ornaments with items listed that are needed at the shelter. Shoppers take an ornament off the tree, purchase the item and return it to the store. A box is provided with the tree for these items. Items needed include dog and cat food, cleaning supplies, toys and gas cards.

Some ornaments list monetary donations to pay for a dog or cat spay/neuter, veterinary tests, vaccinations, or adoption fees. These monetary donations can be mailed to the Humane Society using a self-addressed envelope that is attached to the ornament.

Port Clinton school board plans 2020 organizational meeting

PORT CLINTON — The Port Clinton City School Board of Education will hold its organizational meeting and regular meeting at 5 p.m. Jan. 10, in the board conference room, 811 Jefferson St.

Port Clinton News Herald
Published 17 hours ago

The Week: 5 key stories from November 29 - December 3, 2021

Jason Miller/Getty Images

The Cleveland Indians completed a $26 million renovation at Progressive Field in 2015. The work was privately financed by the club and its concessionaire, Delaware North.

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Play ball!: The Indians may be gone, but Major League Baseball is staying in Cleveland. Cleveland City Council made sure of that. Council voted 13-3 on Monday night, Nov. 29, to approve its portion of the $435 million Progressive Field renovation package known as Emergency Ordinance 844-2021. The move ensures the Cleveland Guardians will remain in Cleveland through 2036. The city will contribute about $8 million per year, mainly through admission taxes and revenues from the Gateway East parking garage. On Nov. 9, Cuyahoga County Council voted 9-1 to approve funding its portion of the $202.5 million deal to renovate and maintain Progressive Field until at least 2036. Read the full story

Designs on growth: The Sherwin-Williams Co. cleared a major hurdle Tuesday, Nov. 30, winning final design approvals for its planned three-building headquarters complex just west of Public Square. Members of four public review bodies signed off on plans for the downtown Cleveland project, which will remake roughly 7 acres of parking lots in the heart of the city. Sherwin-Williams recently started site work on the property, which runs north from Superior Avenue at the eastern edge of the Warehouse District. The publicly traded coatings giant expects to move into its new home, a glassy, 36-story tower, in late 2024. That office building, at the northwest corner of Superior and West Third Street, will be the centerpiece of a campus that will include a low-slung pavilion facing Public Square and a five-story parking garage closer to St. Clair Avenue. Tuesday’s meeting, which lasted more than two hours, marked the third round of a design-review process that kicked off in July. Read the full story

Job well done: Dr. Akram Boutros will retire as president and CEO of MetroHealth at the end of 2022 after leading the public health system since 2013, he announced on Monday, Nov. 29. Boutros was brought into the system to help transform MetroHealth and establish long-term sustainability and has since “exceeded the board’s, employees’ and the community’s expectations,” said MetroHealth board chair Vanessa Whiting, who served on the search committee that hired Boutros. Since 2013, MetroHealth has opened two hospitals, three emergency departments, 10 community health centers and nine pharmacies, and sent health care providers into more than a dozen local schools, according to the release, which also notes that under Boutros’ leadership, the system’s annual revenue grew from $785 million to more than $1.5 billion. Read the full story

Full Spectrum: Pleasant Valley Corp. co-CEOs Gino and Barbara Faciana acquired the Spectrum Building, 6060 Rockside Woods Blvd., Independence, as an investment and an additional location for the Medina-based company’s growing real estate and construction businesses. Through PVC Independence LLC, the Facianas paid an affiliate of Dalad Group of Independence $13 million for the 120,000-square-foot building, according to online property records for Cuyahoga County. Dalad has owned and operated the structure since building it in 1984. The Facianas said they plan to move a so-far-undetermined number of staffers, perhaps as many as 40 over the next year, to the building and relocate another 30 to the structure from other leased space in Independence, including the headquarters of its NAI Pleasant Valley Corp. real estate brokerage. Pleasant Valley will continue to operate Spectrum as a multitenant building and will have additional space for new tenants beyond its own needs, Barbara Faciana said. The structure has about 24,000 square feet of empty space to fill in multiple suites. Read the full story

His latest project: Actor, producer and businessman Mark Wahlberg has taken a shine to Lorain County. Wahlberg and his business partner, veteran automotive dealer Jay Feldman, announced Thursday, Dec. 2, that they have opened a Mark Wahlberg Airstream & RV dealership at 4500 Grove Ave. in Lorain. It’s the second Lorain County dealership for Wahlberg and Feldman, who in July acquired auto dealership Joe Firment Chevrolet, 37995 Chester Road in Avon, and renamed it Mark Wahlberg Chevrolet of Avon. The new Lorain dealership is the sixth in Ohio for Wahlberg and Feldman, who also have four dealerships in the Columbus area. One of those Columbus dealerships is a Mark Wahlberg Airstream & RV shop, which opened in 2020. Sales functions officially started Wednesday, Dec. 1, at the Mark Wahlberg Airstream & RV dealership in Lorain, though the main facility remains under construction. When construction is completed at the end of next year, the dealership, which is on a 5.8-acre site, will feature 31,000 square feet of showroom, service and parts space, and it will employ about 30 to 35 people. It has eight employees at present. Read the full story

Crains Cleveland Business
Published 17 hours ago

Ohio University Athletics achieves record-setting graduation successes

ATHENS – In graduation data released by the NCAA, Ohio University student-athletes have a four-class average (2011-15) of 92 percent in the Graduation Success Rate (GSR), surpassing the four-class average of 90 percent set between 2010-14.

“Our University places priority on graduating our student-athletes and helping them become leaders after college athletics,” said Ohio University Director of Athletics Julie Cromer in a news release. “Achieving our highest graduation success rate in program history is the result of the hard work our student-athletes, academic staff, coaches and faculty put toward achieving academic excellence.”

The 2014-15 cohort also has a federal graduation rate (FGR) of 78 percent. The student-athlete graduation rate calculated directly based on IPEDS-GRS (which is the methodology the U.S. Department of Education requires) is the proportion of first-year, full-time student-athletes who entered a school on athletics aid and graduated from that institution within six years. This federal rate does not account for students who transfer from their original institution and graduate elsewhere. OHIO student-athletes continue to outperform the general student population at OHIO when comparing term and yearly FGR.

Ohio University ranked second both in GSR and FGR among Mid-American Conference schools.

NCAA members, particularly presidents and chancellors, asked the NCAA in the early 2000s to develop a measure of student-athlete graduation success that more accurately reflects modern-day patterns of student enrollment and transfer. As a result, the NCAA created the Graduation Success Rate (GSR) for Division I.

The NCAA GSR differs from the federal calculation in two important ways. First, the GSR holds colleges accountable for those student-athletes who transfer into their school. Second, the GSR does not penalize colleges whose student-athletes transfer in good academic standing. Essentially, those student-athletes are moved into another college’s cohort.

Logan Daily News
Published 17 hours ago

New book examines history of University of Mount Union

Paige Bennett
The Repository

ALLIANCE – Harry Paidas didn't just write a book about the most important moments in the last 25 years of the University of Mount Union's history.

He was usually in the room when they happened.

The 69-year-old, who graduated from the university in 1974, spent 33 years working at Mount Union, where he held the positions of chief public relations officer, director of the Regula Center for Public Service and Civic Engagement, and faculty member in the department of communication.

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In the summer of 2020, President Thomas Botzman asked Paidas to author a book detailing major events that took place at Mount Union since 1996 in light of the university's 175th anniversary this year.

Professor Emeritus Bill Coleman and Dodie Davis, former director of alumni engagement, were asked by Botzman to serve as editors.

"It was really helpful to know the background of some of the decisions that were made having been there and knowing the presidents as well as I did," Paidas said.

His book, entitled "Make the Echoes Roll," will be released sometime in the coming months. It is the third work to be written about the university's history and is preceded by "Wake the Echoes" by John Saffell and "A Select School: The History of Mount Union College" by Newell Yost Osborne.

Ryan Smith, director of academic marketing at Mount Union, said in an email that no date has been set for the release of the book, which is being published by the school. The cost and details about how to purchase a copy are expected to be announced later.

"Make the Echoes Roll" highlights different aspects of Mount Union's recent history, including the decisions of university presidents, the success of the football program and how the implementation of new majors and programs shaped the institution.

"Because I lived it, I still had recollections of what happened during those 25 years and what the important points were in that timeframe, so I just started writing," Paidas said. "My background is that I was an undergraduate English major, and I have a master's in journalism."

After Paidas wrote about the history he could recall from memory, he went through his work and identified places where he needed to find sources to support the information. He consulted old copies of Mount Union's alumni magazine and student newspaper, notes from various council and board meetings, and interviewed people who were present at the time.

The book's chapters are divided by presidential terms. Additionally, the book includes a section focused on the university's athletic programs.

"I don't think anybody's going to realize how significant (football) has been until maybe this dynasty ends. This rise in football created such a positive atmosphere at Mount Union in many ways," Paidas said.

Mount Union's football program has seen tremendous success since the early 1990s. The Purple Raiders have won 13 national championships since 1993.

The success of the program, Paidas said, put a national spotlight on the university, helping increase student enrollment and draw attention to the university's academic programs. The liberal arts school has about 2,100 students.

Paidas also said the university expanded its offerings in the 2000s to incorporate more math and medicine-oriented programs.

"That really changed the face of the institution," he said. "In fact, this kind of shocked me as I wrote this, the No. 1 major at Mount Union currently did not even exist in 2013, and that was nursing."

Paidas anticipates the book will be sent to the printer sometime this holiday season and hopes it will be available for purchase soon after.

Reach Paige at 330-580-8577 or pmbennett@gannett.com, or on Twitter at @paigembenn.

Alliance Review
Published 18 hours ago

'A beautiful night to do this:' Shoppers fill downtown for Candlelight Christmas

Gere Goble
Bucyrus Telegraph-Forum

It was cold enough that at the Bucyrus Kiwanis Club tent, Brittany Locker was warming her hands alongside the big chili pot — but not so chilly that John Kuhn couldn't wear red shorts with his Santa Claus sweatshirt, red cap and long, white beard.

In short, Thursday evening's weather was pretty much ideal for the Bucyrus Area Chamber of Commerce's annual Candlelight Christmas, which returned after a year off due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

"I hope a lot of people come up and take advantage of it," Veronica Hildreth, FCBank's community office manager, said as the evening's activities got started. "In past years, it's been cold and it snowed, which kind of sets the scene and gets everyone in the Christmas spirit — but it's a beautiful night to do this."

For the third year, the bank sponsored an iceless skating rink, which was set up on Washington Square in front of its office. Employees gave away hot cocoa, cookies and bright red Rudolph noses for the kids.

"We're so excited to get out and see people and mingle with the community," Hildreth said. "I know a lot of people look forward to this."

Across Mansfield Street, Locker was dishing out bowls of chili made by workers at the Crawford County Council on Aging — where she's the nutrition coordinator — for a donation.

A Salvation Army bell-ringer was stationed outside the Pelican House, where representatives from Grace's Light had a table, too. Other local organizations had booths set up along the street, and a number of churches had tables at Schines Art Park, where people could board vintage carriage rides.

As crowds began to fill downtown streets, students from the Bucyrus schools' combined show choirs arrived to sing carols, as did members of United in Harmony.

Jessie Furner, the chamber's executive director, said the event stretched from Ley's Jewelry, 225 N. Sandusky Ave., to Flour and Whisk Bakery, 416 S. Sandusky Ave.

There was an art show in the community room at First Federal Bank, and a photo booth at Old Crawford Land and Title. The Browns Backers Club did a "Poker Walk," encouraging people to visit six downtown businesses for a chance to win prizes.

Things seemed to be going well, she said.

"I think so," Furner said. "This is my first one, so ask me tomorrow." She started her job right after the 2019 event, and the 2020 one was canceled, she explained. "But so far, so good."

ggoble@gannett.com

419-559-7263

bucyrustelegraphforum.com
Published 18 hours ago

Parents captured after son charged in Oxford school shooting

By COREY WILLIAMS and ED WHITE Associated Press

Dec 4, 2021

James, left, and Jennifer Crumbley are shown during the video arraignment of their son, Ethan Crumbley in Rochester Hills, Mich., on Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against the Crumbleys whose 15-year-old son is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows James Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows Jennifer Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer embraces Oakland County Executive Dave Coulter as the two leave flowers and pay their respects Thursday morning, Dec. 2, 2021 at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.

Waterford resident Andrew Baldwin, cousin of Madisyn Baldwin, places candles at the base of a a memorial with his 5-year-old daughter Ariyah Baldwin on Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021 outside of Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. Madisyn Baldwin, 17, was one of four teens killed in Tuesday's school shooting. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said.

Photos of three of the four teens killed in the Oxford High School shooting are posted on the window at Sullivan's Public House Restaurant and Bar on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said.

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer embraces Oakland County Executive Dave Coulter as the two leave flowers and pay their respects Thursday morning, Dec. 2, 2021 at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.

A football is left in honor of Tate Myre, one of the four victims who was killed in Tuesday's school shooting, at a memorial where family, friends, students and relatives of victims put up bouquets of flowers, candles and personalized messages near an entrance to the Oxford High School on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.

Freshmen Rory Metzger, left, and Zachary Majewski place bows on trees outside Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday.

Wreaths with black bows are shown at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday.

Students hug at a memorial at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday.

Mourners grieve at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday.

Mourners grieve at a memorial at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday.

Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school, killing three students and wounding six other people, including a teacher.

A prosecutor considering criminal charges against the parents of a boy accused in a Michigan school shooting says people who handle guns irresponsibly should be "held accountable."

Mourners pack a Michigan church to grieve those killed and injured in a school shooting

This booking photo released by the Oakland County, Mich., Sheriff's Office shows Ethan Crumbley, 15, who is charged as an adult with murder and terrorism for a shooting that killed four fellow students and injured more at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., authorities said Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021.

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, a sheriff's office said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in Detroit, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A vehicle tied to the couple had been located by a Detroit business owner late Friday. The couple was found a short time later, and the pair were expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail.

A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the parents earlier Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.

The Crumbleys committed “egregious” acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

“I expect parents and everyone to have humanity and to step in and stop a potential tragedy,” she said. “The conclusion I draw is that there was absolute reason to believe this individual was dangerous and disturbed.”

Authorities said Friday afternoon that they were looking for the couple. Sheriff Mike Bouchard said their attorney, Shannon Smith, had agreed to arrange their arrest if charges were filed but hadn't been able to reach them.

Smith, however, said the Crumbleys weren't on the run and had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety.”

“They are returning to the area to be arraigned,” Smith had told The Associated Press.

Then Friday night, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to the Crumbleys' arrest.

McCabe said the business owner in Detroit spotted the Crumbley's vehicle and called 911. A woman seen nearby ran away when the citizen called authorities, the undersheriff said.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting, three days after four students were killed and others were wounded at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He’s charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a “war zone” and won’t be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, "No discipline was warranted.”

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. ... I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah," she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”

———

White reported from Detroit. Associated Press journalist Mike Householder in Detroit and David Eggert in Lansing, Mich., also contributed to this report.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Bryan Times Online
Published 18 hours ago

Robertson Kitchen & Bath Difference Maker: Alana Ryan, Alliance Middle

The Alliance Review

NAME – Alana Ryan

SCHOOL – Alliance Middle School

RESIDENCE – Alliance

AGE – 31

JOB TITLE – Community and family liaison behavioral specialist

HOW LONG WITH DISTRICT – Seven years

FAMILY – Nicholas Ryan (father), Christine Pershing (mother), Cherokee Burrell (sister, 35), Dalton Ryan (brother, 29), and Corbin Pershing (brother, 15).

NOMINATION – "Ms. Ryan is currently coordinating the AMS Student Improvement Lab. She does a very nice job of working with our students and re-directing them towards positive behaviors and she is firm in her approach but demonstrates great understanding of the needs of each student."

WHAT IS THE MOST REWARDING PART OF YOUR POSITION? – The most rewarding part of my position is working with our students of Alliance Middle School and having “talks” about the challenges of life. As a teacher here at AMS, I value the importance of relationships with staff, students, and parents because without relationships there is no heart for education.

WHAT IS THE MOST CHALLENGING? – The most challenging part of my job is helping my students take their education seriously. Most students want to do their best but have to negotiate various obstacles to achieve their goal. I make an effort to identify and remove the obstacles and barriers that keep students from realizing their full potential.

IF YOU WEREN'T DOING THIS, YOU'D BE ... – ... traveling around the world as an inspirational speaker for young men and women. I would love to share my personal journey as a child and would try to inspire students to overcome their circumstances through confidence, compassion and grit.

TELL US SOMETHING ABOUT THE STUDENTS YOU DEAL WITH THAT MOST PEOPLE DON'T KNOW OR APPRECIATE? – Most people do not realize that the students that come to the Student Improvement Lab are not “bad students.” They come to me because they have made a poor decision (like we have all done at some point in our lives). They need to be reminded that their education is important, that they are important and they have potential to impact their community. I appreciate these students because of their willingness to share openly and take an active role in making positive changes to better themselves.

HOW DO YOU UNWIND AFTER A LONG DAY AT WORK? – A few of the things that I do to help myself unwind after work are cleaning, working in the yard, walking, and reading a variety of different books.

STUDENTS AND COWORKERS WOULD BE SURPRISED TO KNOW THAT YOU ... – ... lived in Melbourne, Australia as a part of the University of Mount Union’s study abroad program for a half a year. While studying abroad, some of the highlights from my travels were seeing the Great Barrier Reef (Cairns), the Great Ocean Road, Australia Zoo; Home of The Crocodile Hunter Steve Irwin (Beerwah), and the Sydney Opera House (Sydney).

WHAT IS ONE RESPONSIBILITY ABOUT YOUR POSITION THAT YOU DIDN'T KNOW EXISTED BEFORE TAKING IT? – One of the responsibilities about my position that I didn’t know existed is realizing my students need to know that I care about them personally and educationally. These are equally important in my classroom. I am proud to be part of a staff that pours time, heart and love into our students.

Alliance Review
Published 18 hours ago

‘We just feel it’: Racism plagues US military academies

Beyond blanket anti-discrimination policies, U.S. military academies volunteer little about how they address racial slights some graduates of color say they faced.

Author: AARON MORRISON (HELEN WIEFFERING and NOREEN NASIR, Associated Press)

Published: 9:41 AM EST December 3, 2021

Updated: 9:41 AM EST December 3, 2021

Eight years after he graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Geoffrey Easterling remains astonished by the Confederate history still memorialized on the storied academy’s campus – the six-foot-tall painting of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee in the library, the barracks dormitory named for Lee and the Lee Gate on Lee Road.

As a Black student at the Army academy, he remembers feeling “devastated” when a classmate pointed out the slave also depicted in the life-size Lee painting. “How did the only Black person who got on a wall in this entire humongous school — how is it a slave?” he recalls thinking.

As a diversity admissions officer, he later traveled the country recruiting students to West Point from underrepresented communities. “It was so hard to tell people like, ‘Yeah, you can trust the military,’ and then their kids Google and go ‘Why is there a barracks named after Lee?’” he said.

The nation’s military academies provide a key pipeline into the leadership of the armed services and, for the better part of the last decade, they have welcomed more racially diverse students each year. But beyond blanket anti-discrimination policies, these federally funded institutions volunteer little about how they screen for extremist or hateful behavior, or address the racial slights that some graduates of color say they faced daily.

In an Associated Press story earlier this year, current and former enlistees and officers in nearly every branch of the armed services described a deep-rooted culture of racism and discrimination that stubbornly festers, despite repeated efforts to eradicate it.

Less attention has been paid to the premiere institutions that produce a significant portion of the services’ officer corps – the academies of the U.S. Army, the U.S. Navy, the U.S. Air Force, the U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Merchant Marine.

Some graduates of color from the nation’s top military schools who endured what they described as a hostile environment are left questioning the military maxim that all service members wearing the same uniform are equal.

That includes Carlton Shelley II, who was recruited to play football for West Point from his Sarasota, Florida, high school and entered the academy in 2009. On the field, he described the team as “a brotherhood,” where his skin color never impacted how he was treated. But off the field, he said, he and other Black classmates too often were treated like the stereotype of the angry Black man – an experience that brought him to tears at the time.

“I was repeatedly in trouble or being corrected for infractions that were not actually infractions,” he said. “It was a very deliberate choice to dig and to push on certain individuals compared with other cadets -- white cadets.”

Credit: AP

Carlton Shelley II, center, is seen in this photo of the graduating class of 2013 at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y.

Xavier Bruce, who graduated from the Air Force Academy in 1999 and rose to the rank of lieutenant colonel during his 24 years of duty, said that for him, it was the ongoing slights directed at him as a Black man, rather than openly racist behavior, that cut deep.

“We just feel it, we feel the energy behind it, and it just eats us away,” he said.

Some students of color have spotlighted what they see as systemic racism and discrimination at the academies by creating Instagram accounts — “ Black at West Point,” “ Black at USAFA ” and “ Black at USNA ” — to relate their personal experiences.

“I was walking with a classmate and we were both speaking Spanish when a white, male upperclassman turned around and said ‘Speak English, this is America,’” a 2020 Air Force Academy graduate wrote in one post.

In response to the AP’s findings, a spokesman for the Department of Defense, Maj. Charlie Dietz, said the service academies make it a policy to offer equal opportunities regardless of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity or sexual orientation. He said the DOD formed a special team in April to advance progress on diversity, equity and inclusion across the entire department, including the academies.

West Point did not respond to repeated requests for comment, beyond reiterating the importance of diversity to its admissions process and to preparing cadets for leadership.

Credit: AP

FILE - United States Military Academy graduating cadets sit during their graduation ceremony of the U.S. Military Academy class 2021 at Michie Stadium on Saturday, May 22, 2021, in West Point, N.Y.

Following the murder of George Floyd in 2020, which sparked protests around the globe, a group of prominent West Point alums had released a 40-page letter urging the academy to address “major failures” in combatting intolerance and racism. “Though we are deeply disturbed, we hold fast to the hope that our Alma Mater will take the necessary steps to champion the values it espouses,” the letter said.

An appendix offered anonymous testimonials gathered last year from West Point cadets about incidents they said went unaddressed by school officials. “I had a racist roommate that would call me the n-word and spit on me,” one cadet wrote. “I told the 4th Regimental Tactical Officer about it, and they did nothing.”

Shelley acknowledges West Point has become more racially diverse, but said the academy has significant work to do to retain and support students of color. In his class, he estimated about 35 Black students graduated — “some crazy low number,” he said. “And we started with a lot more.”

Credit: AP

West Point cadets celebrate after graduation ceremonies at the United States Military Academy, Saturday, May 26, 2018, in West Point, N.Y.

In a sense, the tributes to Lee that still dot the West Point campus illustrate the academy’s dichotomy: Cadets studying military history are taught that Confederate soldiers were no heroes, yet the references to Lee — a West Point graduate who later became the academy’s superintendent — remain.

The latest annual defense spending bill mandated that the Defense Department survey all its military properties for references or symbols that potentially commemorate the Confederacy, including at West Point, which the commission overseeing the work picked as its first site to visit earlier this year. But the deadline to act on any recommendations is still more than two years away.

Credit: AP

A painting of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee is displayed at West Point Museum, Saturday, Nov. 20, 2021, in West Point, N.Y.

___

The U.S. armed forces were segregated until the mid-1950s, when an influx of fighters were needed for the Korean War. Now, the collected services applaud themselves for 200 years as “the greatest military force in history,” attracting men and women who represent all creeds, religions, races, ethnicities and sexual orientations.

At the academies, integration happened much earlier, following the abolition of slavery. During Black History Month at West Point, honor is paid to Henry O. Flipper, a formerly enslaved man who became the academy’s first Black graduate in 1877. But the West Point that Flipper attended was rife with prejudice: His white classmates and professors refused to acknowledge his presence.

Today, the academies are a growing pathway to officer status for Black cadets, 2019 data from the Under Secretary of Defense shows, with about 13% of Black active-duty officers commissioned through the five institutions, compared to 19% of white active-duty officers.

Most students who enroll — about 60-70% — are nominated by U.S. senators or representatives from their home states as part of a system created in the 1840s to build a politically and geographically diverse officer corps. But today, the changed demographics of the U.S. mean the system gives disproportionate influence to rural congressional districts that tend to be whiter, the AP found.

Only 6% of nominations to the Army, Air Force and Naval academies made by the current members of Congress went to Black candidates, even though 15% of the population aged 18 to 24 is Black, according to a report on the service academies released in March by the Connecticut Veterans’ Legal Center. Eight percent of congressional nominations went to Hispanic students, though they make up 22% of young adults, the report said.

The diversity of nominations has improved slightly in the past 25 years, but the report noted that 49 Congress members did not nominate a single Black student during their time in office and 31 nominated no Hispanic candidates.

Credit: AP

Cadets attend the NCAA college football game between the Army Black Knights and Massachusetts at Michie Stadium, Saturday, Nov. 20, 2021, in West Point, N.Y.

In Texas, nominations to the service academics from senators Ted Cruz and John Cornyn included 23% and 20% people of color, respectively -- among the lowest levels in the Senate compared to the demographics of their state, where more than 60% of young adults are Black, Asian American, Hispanic or Latino.

Cruz’s press secretary, Dave Vasquez, said the senator rejects that race should be factored in when selecting academy nominees and that names, race and other personal information are all removed before an external review board considers applications to Cruz’s office, selecting candidates “on objective merits such as SAT/ACT scores, GPA, and community-service involvement.” Cornyn’s office did not respond to a request for comment.

Curtis Harris said he was awarded one of just three nominations to West Point out of more than 300 applications to his congressman. He graduated in 1978 and became the first in his family to rise to the officer ranks, initially becoming a platoon leader overseeing 35 people and equipment worth millions of dollars at the age of just 21. His uncles had enlisted in the Army and his stepfather was a Navy cook, but they had few options for advancement as Black servicemen, he said.

Credit: AP

Curtis Harris, center, is shown in this photo of Company A-2, from the 1978 "Howitzer" yearbook of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y.

West Point remains a point of pride for Harris: He hasn’t missed an Army-Navy football game in 40 years, and he helps review applications for nominations for U.S. Rep. Adriano Espaillat of New York. He also visits high schools and junior high schools to encourage candidates of diverse backgrounds to apply.

In a society where opportunity is not given out equally, Harris said, the academy provides the “ammunition” to be successful. Yet diversifying West Point is “not going to happen by itself,” he said. “I just think that particularly people of color should know that this opportunity exists.”

Credit: AP

Curtis Harris, a 1978 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, poses for photos, in New York's Central Park, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021.

The Naval, Air Force, Merchant Marine and Coast Guard academies have generally become more diverse over the past two decades, according to data supplied by the four schools after the AP asked for 20 years of student body demographic data. West Point did not provide historical records, but Col. Deborah McDonald, the academy’s admissions director, said it is welcoming more and more diverse students, with 37% of the class of 2024 identifying as nonwhite. A decade ago, that proportion was more like 25%, she said.

Non-white racial groups did not see appreciable changes at some academies. For instance, while the number of Hispanic cadets increased in the past two decades at the Coast Guard and Naval academies, Black cadets showed no noticeable increase during that time. In the class of 2000, there were 73 Black midshipmen in the Naval Academy -- and just 77 in 2020. At the Coast Guard Academy, there were 15 Black cadets in the 2001 class. And in 2021? Merely 16.

According to the data provided to the AP, graduation rates between racial groups at the Naval and Coast Guard academies continued to show gaps. At the Naval Academy, for example, Black midshipmen still had the lowest graduation rate of any racial group at 74%, compared to the 2020 school-wide rate of 87%. And the Black graduation rate of 65% at the Coast Guard Academy between 2011 and 2020 lagged about 20 percentage points behind other racial groups.

Only data from the Navy and Coast Guard was complete and detailed enough to look at graduate rate trends by race.

Two of the five academies -- West Point and the Air Force Academy -- now have their first Black leaders. But Easterling, the West Point graduate, noted that the faculty there remains mostly white, meaning that students who “don’t see themselves, and don’t want to stay” can find it hard to ask for help.

Credit: AP

Retired Army Capt. Geoffrey Easterling is photographed at his home in Atlanta, on Thursday, Nov. 18, 2021.

Greg Elliott said he often found himself in trouble as a midshipman at the Merchant Marine Academy and was asked to leave without graduating. He doesn’t blame the academy for his mistakes and he said he never faced overt racism, but he wonders if a more diverse faculty and student body could have changed his course by making him feel he belonged.

He remembers a fellow Black alum telling him to just plow through with his head down and realize the academy was “a terrible place to be at, but it’s a great place to be from.”

Both Easterling and Shelley said they also saw signs of extremism during their time in the Army -- for Easterling, it was a member of his unit wearing a symbol for the Three Percenters, an anti-government paramilitary group. Both said the academies -- and the military -- need stronger guidelines for recognizing and confronting language and symbols that suggest an extremist path.

Credit: AP

Carlton Shelley II poses for a picture at his home in West Orange, N.J., Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021.

Kyle Bibby, a Naval Academy graduate who served for six years in the Marine Corps as an infantry officer, said those who characterize white supremacism only as extreme behavior miss the insidious damage that casual racism and discriminatory attitudes can inflict.

“We view white supremacy as like, you know, somebody’s got the cross in the truck and they’re rolling to your crib to go burn it,” said Bibby, who co-founded the Black Veterans Project, which advocates for racial justice in the armed services. But the cuts are much more subtle, he said.

At the Naval Academy, he said he once was told that he was “the whitest Black guy” one of his white classmates had ever met because of his skill at trivia games. Another white classmate, unaware Bibby was in earshot, remarked that he didn’t care that his sister was dating a Filipino guy but would “kill” her if she dated a Black guy.

Timothy Berry, a former Army field artillery officer who graduated from West Point in 2013 and served as class president, said he never felt comfortable reporting racist incidents while at the academy, fearing it would draw unwanted scrutiny to him not being a “perfect cadet,” however minor his shortcomings might be.

An inspector general’s report last year found the Coast Guard Academy had mishandled nearly a dozen race-based harassment allegations between 2013 and 2018 and also noted that harassment was underreported in part because of “concerns about negative consequences.”

Lt. Cmdr. Kimberly Young-McLear, a Black woman who taught at the academy from 2014 to 2019, said she herself faced years of harassment and retaliation on campus, which she has detailed in congressional testimony. She said she continues to hear from cadets, faculty and staff at the academy who are afraid to speak out about their negative treatment.

“They truly are reaching out because they don’t have anywhere else to turn,” she said. “This isn’t about cadets just whining and complaining. They’re going against a very powerful institution.”

___

Although the academies play a big role in the diversity of military leadership, some have argued that the pipeline begins even earlier, at the high school level.

The Department of Defense sponsors Junior ROTC programs at high schools around the country where students can learn the values of the armed services, run drills and wear the uniforms. According to a 2017 study sponsored by the Secretary of Defense, the programs are often located at high schools with larger-than-average populations of students of color.

Though it may not be an official recruitment program, Junior ROTC promotes the military branches as a pathway to excellence.

Cadet handbooks for the Navy, Army, Air Force and Marine Corps all stipulate non-discrimination policies with regard to race and gender, and emphasize treating everyone with dignity and respect.

But former Junior ROTC instructor Cardelle Anthony Hopkins said little was done after one of his students at Lake Brantley High School in Florida alerted him to social media posts by her fellow cadets making racist comments about Hopkins, a retired Black master sergeant. The language was crude and threatening: One comment said he needed to be “tar and feathered.” “No n------ in my corps,” read another.

The students also created a fake Instagram account impersonating Hopkins that included posts making fun of cadets. And ahead of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, someone posted a sign on his classroom door reading “Blood and Soil,” a white supremacist slogan.

“I was so intimidated even walking to my car. I’m thinking, I’m a grown man … I’ve never been this terrified,” Hopkins said. “In my entire 23 years in the military, I had never been called a n----- ever. And here I am being called that by my students.”

Near the end of 2019, Hopkins said he noticed a change in the types of students enrolling in the JROTC program. In one of his freshman classrooms, for instance, every white student wrote a message in support of President Donald Trump while working on an art project to decorate ceiling tiles, he said.

“I could see that these students were a different breed,” he said, noting that their behavior prompted the parents of one of his Black students to remove their daughter from the program.

Hopkins said he complained about the harassment but that it wasn’t until other students went directly to Lake Brantley Principal Brian Blasewitz saying they knew who was responsible that administration officials acted to track down the two main students involved.

Hopkins said the students eventually received four-day suspensions. Blasewitz told the AP that the incidents were taken seriously, but would not disclose any disciplinary measures.

Hopkins contacted the officer then heading the Air Force Junior ROTC, who he said expressed sympathy but took no other action, other than saying Hopkins could request a transfer to a new school.

“We have roughly 120,000 cadets in Air Force JROTC alone,” Hopkins said. “This one colonel sitting in his office has the ability to put out a message to every last Air Force Junior ROTC school if he wants to that says ‘We will not tolerate anything like this’ and really get on top of this.’”

In an email to the AP, the current Air Force Junior ROTC director, Col. Johnny R. McGonigal, said the responsibility for addressing the incidents fell on the high school, writing that “the instructors are employees of the school and the school district is responsible for investigating and resolving disciplinary matters such as this one.”

Feeling defeated and isolated, Hopkins said his father -- a veteran and also a former JROTC instructor -- advised him to leave, telling him “there’s no reason to put yourself through this.”

After briefly holding the same job at another school, he stepped away from JROTC altogether and abandoned a lawsuit he had filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. He’s joining a Tampa, Florida, high school as a teacher’s assistant -- a job that doesn’t capitalize on his more than 20 years of military experience.

Hopkins said his ordeal leaves him unsettled about the future of the JROTC and, ultimately, the U.S. military.

“It just feels like a breeding ground for hatred,” he said of JROTC. “And it’s not being checked.”

___

Cleveland MSNBC WEWS-TV Cable
Published 18 hours ago

Parents of the Michigan school shooting suspect have been captured

James and Jennifer Crumbley are shown during the video arraignment of their son, Ethan Crumbley, in Rochester Hills, Mich., on Wednesday. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday against the Crumbleys, whose 15-year-old son is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.

AP

Originally published on December 4, 2021 3:30 am

PONTIAC, Mich. — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, according to a sheriff's office.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in Detroit, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A vehicle tied to the couple had been located by a Detroit business owner late Friday.

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since Friday afternoon. Sheriff Mike Bouchard said their attorney, Shannon Smith, had agreed to arrange their arrest if charges were filed but hadn't been able to reach them.

Smith, however, said the Crumbleys weren't on the run and had left town earlier in the week "for their own safety."

"They are returning to the area to be arraigned," Smith had told The Associated Press.

This booking photo released by the Oakland County, Mich., Sheriff's Office shows Ethan Crumbley, 15, who is charged as an adult with murder and terrorism for a shooting that killed four fellow students and injured more at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich.

AP

Ethan Crumbley, 15, is charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes. Officials said he pulled out a gun at Oxford High School on Tuesday, fatally shooting four people and injuring seven others.

Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald filed involuntary manslaughter charges earlier Friday against the parents, saying they failed to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — "blood everywhere" — that was found at the boy's desk.

James and Jennifer Crumbley committed "egregious" acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

"I expect parents and everyone to have humanity and to step in and stop a potential tragedy," she said. "The conclusion I draw is that there was absolute reason to believe this individual was dangerous and disturbed."

By mid-afternoon, authorities had said they were searching for the couple. Sheriff Mike Bouchard said their attorney, Smith, had agreed to arrange their arrest if charges were filed but hadn't been able to reach them.

Smith, however, said the Crumbleys weren't on the run and had left town earlier in the week "for their own safety."

U.S. Marshals on Friday night announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to the Crumbleys' arrest.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting, three days after four students were killed and others were wounded at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said.

Photos of three of the four teens killed in the Oxford High School shooting are posted on the window at Sullivan's Public House Restaurant and Bar on Thursday in Oxford, Mich.

Jake May / AP

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative's house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: "Lol. I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan's desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, "The thoughts won't stop. Help me," McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: "Blood everywhere."

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, "My life is useless" and "The world is dead," according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and "resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time," McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

"The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it's criminal," the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, "Ethan, don't do it," McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents' bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, "Just got my new beauty today," McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a "mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a "war zone" and won't be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, "No discipline was warranted."

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom. ... I believe that is a universal position. I'm not going to chastise or attack, but yeah," she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: "The investigation's ongoing."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

WCBE 90.5 FM - Columbus
Published 18 hours ago

Parents captured after son charged in Oxford school shooting

Caption

James, left, and Jennifer Crumbley are shown during the video arraignment of their son, Ethan Crumbley in Rochester Hills, Mich., on Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against the Crumbleys whose 15-year-old son is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school. (

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Nation & World

By COREY WILLIAMS and ED WHITE, Associated Press

Updated 26 minutes ago

A sheriff's office in Michigan says the parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a high school have been caught early Saturday

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, officials said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in a commercial building in Detroit that housed artwork, Detroit Police Chief James E. White told a news conference. White said the couple “were aided in getting into the building,” and that a person who helped them may also face charges.

A Detroit business owner spotted a car tied to the Crumbleys in his parking lot late Friday, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A woman seen near the vehicle ran away when the business owner called 911, McCabe said. The couple was later located and arrested by Detroit police.

A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the Crumbleys on Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.

The Crumbleys committed "egregious" acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

Authorities had been looking for the couple since Friday afternoon. Late Friday, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to their arrests.

The Crumbley's attorney, Shannon Smith, said the pair had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety.” Smith told The Associated Press they would be returning to Oxford to be arraigned.

However, White said the Crumbleys “appeared to be hiding” in the building where they were found. He added that the parents appeared to be “distressed” when they were captured.

“Head down... just very upset,” he said of one of the parents.

The couple was expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail, McCabe said.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He's charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a "war zone" and won't be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, “No discipline was warranted.”

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. ... I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah,” she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”

___

White reported from Detroit. Associated Press journalist Mike Householder in Detroit and David Eggert in Lansing, Mich., also contributed to this report.

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows James Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows James Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows Jennifer Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows Jennifer Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer embraces Oakland County Executive Dave Coulter as the two leave flowers and pay their respects Thursday morning, Dec. 2, 2021 at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.(Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer embraces Oakland County Executive Dave Coulter as the two leave flowers and pay their respects Thursday morning, Dec. 2, 2021 at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.(Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Waterford resident Andrew Baldwin, cousin of Madisyn Baldwin, places candles at the base of a a memorial with his 5-year-old daughter Ariyah Baldwin on Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021 outside of Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. Madisyn Baldwin, 17, was one of four teens killed in Tuesday's school shooting. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Waterford resident Andrew Baldwin, cousin of Madisyn Baldwin, places candles at the base of a a memorial with his 5-year-old daughter Ariyah Baldwin on Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021 outside of Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. Madisyn Baldwin, 17, was one of four teens killed in Tuesday's school shooting. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Photos of three of the four teens killed in the Oxford High School shooting are posted on the window at Sullivan's Public House Restaurant and Bar on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Photos of three of the four teens killed in the Oxford High School shooting are posted on the window at Sullivan's Public House Restaurant and Bar on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer embraces Oakland County Executive Dave Coulter as the two leave flowers and pay their respects Thursday morning, Dec. 2, 2021 at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.(Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer embraces Oakland County Executive Dave Coulter as the two leave flowers and pay their respects Thursday morning, Dec. 2, 2021 at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.(Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

A football is left in honor of Tate Myre, one of the four victims who was killed in Tuesday's school shooting, at a memorial where family, friends, students and relatives of victims put up bouquets of flowers, candles and personalized messages near an entrance to the Oxford High School on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.(Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

A football is left in honor of Tate Myre, one of the four victims who was killed in Tuesday's school shooting, at a memorial where family, friends, students and relatives of victims put up bouquets of flowers, candles and personalized messages near an entrance to the Oxford High School on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old boy has been denied bail and moved to jail after being charged in the Michigan school shooting that killed four students and injured others.(Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

This booking photo released by the Oakland County, Mich., Sheriff's Office shows Ethan Crumbley, 15, who is charged as an adult with murder and terrorism for a shooting that killed four fellow students and injured more at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., authorities said Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. (Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This booking photo released by the Oakland County, Mich., Sheriff's Office shows Ethan Crumbley, 15, who is charged as an adult with murder and terrorism for a shooting that killed four fellow students and injured more at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., authorities said Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. (Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

Freshmen Rory Metzger, left, and Zachary Majewski place bows on trees outside Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Freshmen Rory Metzger, left, and Zachary Majewski place bows on trees outside Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Wreaths with black bows are shown at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Wreaths with black bows are shown at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Students hug at a memorial at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Students hug at a memorial at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Mourners grieve at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Mourners grieve at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Credit: Paul Sancya

Caption

Mourners grieve at a memorial at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. Authorities say a 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at Oxford High School, killing four students and wounding seven other people on Tuesday. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Credit: Paul Sancya

Credit: Paul Sancya

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