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Televangelist dies, NFL players accused of violating protocol, omicron news, more - coronavirus timeline Nov. 27-Dec. 3

CLEVELAND, Ohio – From the death of a televangelist, an NFL player accused of violating protocol and news about the omicron variant, here is our regular roundup of coronavirus facts, figures and numbers regarding Cleveland, Ohio, the United States and the world Nov. 27-Dec. 3, followed by our quotes of the week:

Nov. 27

Coronavirus hospitalizations continue to rise as they reach their highest point in more than six weeks. Ohio hospitals had 3,419 Covid patients, according to the Ohio Hospital Association. … WGN in Chicago, citing a survey by experience-management software firm Qualtrics, says 28% of unvaccinated workers in the United States would consider lying about their vaccination status - and maybe falsify a document - to keep a job.

Nov. 28

Japanese ski jumper Ryoyu Kobayashi (above photo, top right) announces he has tested positive. A day earlier, with a victory in Finland, he became the first Japanese man to win 20 ski-jumping World Cup competitions.

Nov. 29

The Browns place long snapper Charley Hughlett on the Reserve/Covid list. … Pennsylvania and Michigan appear to be the hardest hit by the pandemic, in terms of deaths and seven-day averages for recent cases, among Ohio and nearby states. Pennsylvania has the highest cumulative number of Covid deaths among Ohio’s nearby states with 33,247. Michigan has the highest seven-day average of new cases among those states, with 8,126. For deaths per capita, Pennsylvania and Indiana rank the highest, and Michigan is the leader for recent cases per capita. For the regional look, Cleveland.com examined data from Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Illinois and Wisconsin. … Nations around the world are seeking to keep the new omicron variant at bay with travel bans and restrictions. Japan announced it would suspend entry of all foreign visitors, while cases of the variant identified days ago by researchers in South Africa appeared as far apart as Hong Kong, Australia and Portugal. … Merriam-Webster has declared an omnipresent truth as its 2021 word of the year: Vaccine. The selection follows “vax” as word of the year from the folks who publish the Oxford English Dictionary. Last year, Merriam-Webster chose ‘pandemic’ as the word of the year.

Nov. 30

CNN reports U.S. government officials are considering requiring everyone who enters the country to be tested for Covid the day before their flight and having all travelers - including U.S. citizens - be tested again after returning home, regardless of vaccination status. … Christian televangelist and anti-vaccine advocate Marcus Lamb – who founded Christian television network Daystar Television Network – dies of Covid. He was 64.

Dec. 1

Ohio reports 8,944 new cases, the second time since early January that the state health department listed more than 8,900 cases in one day. Cases are trending upward as people head indoors for holiday gatherings and the highly transmissible delta variant continues to dominate. … Reuters reports the United States identified its first known Covid case caused by the omicron variant, discovered in a fully vaccinated patient who traveled to South Africa. … Japan asks international airlines to stop taking new reservations for all arriving flights until the end of December as the country tightens its border controls against a new variant, the transportation ministry says. … According to Reuters, Nigeria says it had confirmed its first cases of Omicron, traced to travelers who entered the country in October, suggesting it had turned up weeks before it was reported in southern Africa.

Dec. 2

Ohio reports 9,131 new cases of Covid, the most for as single day since Jan. 8. … University Hospitals will allow unvaccinated caregivers to continue working after Jan. 4, reversing its earlier mandate. … Coronavirus cases continue to increase across the state, with the highest concentration of hospitalizations in Northeast Ohio. According to the Ohio Hospital Association, 905 people were hospitalized with Covid in Northeast Ohio facilities. … Cleveland Metropolitan School District is reporting the most new Covid cases in the state among students and staff, according to the latest weekly update from the Ohio Department of Health. The district – the state’s second largest - reported 154 new cases - 118 among students, 36 among staff members. … With the delta variant pushing up cases in Europe and growing fears over omicron, governments around the world are weighing measures for populations tired of hearing about restrictions. Greeks who are over 60 and refuse coronavirus vaccinations could be hit with monthly fines of more than one-quarter of their pensions - a tough policy that politicians say will cost votes but save lives. Germany announces a nationwide lockdown for the unvaccinated as its leaders back plans for mandatory vaccinations in the coming months. … The NFL suspends Tampa Bay Buccaneers receiver Antonio Brown (above photo, bottom left), teammate Mike Edwards and free agent John Franklin III for violating the league’s Covid protocols. They reportedly misrepresented their vaccination status.

Dec. 3

World Health Organization officials say measures aimed at countering the delta variant should remain the foundation for fighting the pandemic as the omicron variant gains traction, adding that travel restrictions imposed by some countries might buy time.

Quotes of the week

• “We are taking the step as an emergency precaution to prevent a worst-case scenario in Japan.” - Prime Minister Fumio Kishida. The omicron variant has nations mulling restrictions. Japan and Israel have barred entry to foreigners, and Morocco said it would suspend all incoming flights for two weeks.

• “There is no world, I think, where (the effectiveness) is the same level… we had with Delta. I think it’s going to be a material drop. I just don’t know how much because we need to wait for the data. But all the scientists I’ve talked to… are like ‘This is not going to be good’.” – Moderna CEO Stephane Bancel to the Financial Times.

• “We cannot be complacent.” - Dr. Takeshi Kasai, WHO regional director for the Western Pacific. He added border control can delay the virus but nations should prepare for a case surge. Good news: He said none of the information doctors have about omicron suggests a change in how to respond to the virus. So expect a continued push for vaccination rates, social-distancing guidelines, mask-wearing and other measures, added WHO Regional Emergency Director Dr. Babatunde Olowokure.

• “Omicron is a spark that’s on the horizon. Delta variant is the fire that’s here today.” - Dr. Nirav Shah, director of the state Center for Disease Control and Prevention in Maine, where 334 people were in the hospital with Covid as of midweek.

We compile our coronavirus timeline from cleveland.com stories and wire reports. Each Saturday morning, we recap news and stats regarding the virus. Here is the previous coronavirus recap Nov. 20-26.

Cleveland Plain Dealer
Published 15 hours ago

Parents in custody after son charged in Oxford school shooting

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in a commercial building in Detroit Saturday.

Ethan Crumbley's parents during his arraignment Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021.(WILX)

Published: Dec. 4, 2021 at 6:40 AM EST|Updated: 1 hour ago

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, officials said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in a commercial building in Detroit that housed artwork, Detroit Police Chief James E. White told a news conference. White said the couple “were aided in getting into the building,” and that a person who helped them may also face charges.

A Detroit business owner spotted a car tied to the Crumbleys in his parking lot late Friday, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A woman seen near the vehicle ran away when the business owner called 911, McCabe said. The couple was later located and arrested by Detroit police.

A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the Crumbleys on Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.

The Crumbleys committed “egregious” acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

Authorities had been looking for the couple since Friday afternoon. Late Friday, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to their arrests.

The Crumbley’s attorney, Shannon Smith, said the pair had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety.” Smith told The Associated Press they would be returning to Oxford to be arraigned.

However, White said the Crumbleys “appeared to be hiding” in the building where they were found. He added that the parents appeared to be “distressed” when they were captured.

The couple was expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail, McCabe said.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He’s charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a “war zone” and won’t be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, “No discipline was warranted.”

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. ... I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah,” she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”

___

White reported from Detroit. Associated Press journalist Mike Householder in Detroit and David Eggert in Lansing, Mich., also contributed to this report.

Copyright 2021 WTVG. All rights reserved.

13 abc
Published 15 hours ago

Sports success bring out good in communities

Dec 04, 2021 7:30 AM

A community feel.

It doesn’t matter if I’m sitting in a meeting in one of our cities, walking around downtown or catching a parade at one of our smaller towns and villages.

There is a special community feel here that extends beyond small town. It’s one of the reasons I feel so comfortable living somewhere I didn’t grow up, even if I do prefer the Maize and Blue to the Scarlet and Grey. (Sorry, I had to go there!)

The area this feel most exists is in the schools.

I’ve always been a big fan of high school sports. As a child, I’d chart out the schedules and results of the local teams, begging my dad to take me to games on weekend nights.

So it’s been exciting to see the success of our local teams. I saw the Clyde community rally behind the 2019 football state champions. I saw it with Calvert and the 2020 volleyball state title. And I saw it just a few weeks ago with Liberty-Benton’s 2021 volleyball state title. I watched it as Columbian marched farther in the football playoffs than it ever had in 2020, winning four straight home games to capture the regional title.

And this year — a tremendous year on the local gridiron — I saw it in places like Hopewell-Loudon, Ottawa-Glandorf and Findlay, all of whom took extended runs through the playoffs, with H-L and O-G making it to the state semifinals.

And I’ve seen it no more than in Carey, who battles Coldwater at 3 p.m. today for a shot at the Blue Devils’ first state championship since 1975.

The Blue Devils have been on an upward trajectory for years under coach Jonathon Mershman, and it has all culminated in a shocking jaunt through the Division 6 bracket the past five weeks.

The Blue Devils are going to win or they are going to lose today. But this has been a galvanizing effort for tight-knit Carey. The early week saw students painting blue-and-white messages on the windows of local businesses, many of whom announced they will be closed today for the big game played two hours away at Canton’s Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium.

You want to see a quiet place? Drive through downtown Carey late this afternoon.

These teams always have heartwarming stories of family. Many of the current Blue Devils had fathers who played football and parents who are Carey grads.

I think of the Steen family. Dave Steen was a former Carey standout in his own right, and serves as the Blue Devils’ special teams coordinator. His son, Drew, is a senior stalwart on the team’s defensive line. His middle son, Luke, is a freshman on the varsity team; while his youngest son, Eli, serves as a water boy on the sidelines.

All teams have stories just like these, and they are small pieces of what creates that close-knit feel. Even so, a galvanizing run like this is thicker than blood. Family is a unit also built through community, a unit that includes the team, cheerleaders, band, parents, fans and the town at large.

When I was a junior in high school, my school had a tremendous hockey team. I did not play, but had many friends on the squad. I remember trekking three hours to see my team play in the state finals, thousands of people in my town doing the same thing. It was awesome, and one of the best moments of my high school life.

It’s good to see communities in our neck of the woods having the same kind of experiences. Schools are the centerpiece of our local communities, and it’s great to see galvanization and excitement.

Good luck, Blue Devils!

Speer is the publisher of The Advertiser-Tribune, Tiffin; Review Times, Fostoria; and The Courier, Findlay. He can be reached at jeremyspeer@thecourier.com or jspeer@advertiser-tribune.com.

Tiffin Advertiser Tribune
Published 15 hours ago

Legal experts discuss charges brought against parents of alleged Michigan school shooter

DAYTON, Ohio (WDTN) — On Friday, December 3, 2021, the parents of the alleged Michigan school shooter were formerly charged by prosecutors in Oakland County; however, Miami Valley legal experts believe the prosecution will have a difficult time proving there is enough evidence to support those charges.

Teen charged in Michigan high school shooting that killed 4

James and Jennifer Crumbley both face four counts of involuntary manslaughter.

“The concept of involuntary manslaughter is that a person was acting either recklessly or grossly negligently, and in doing so, someone died,” Thaddeus Hoffmeister, a professor of law at the University of Dayton, said.

Legal experts believe the prosecution will face an uphill battle in court. According to common law, parents have a certain duty to protect their children. Prosecutors will have to prove Jennifer and James Crumbley acted recklessly or negligently, by allowing their son to have access to the gun and by keeping him in school the day of the shooting.

“They’ve got to make that connection and that was where the negligence occurred. They failed to do what they should have done as a duty to their children, to protect them and to protect others from them, and they failed to do that,” Marc Clauson, a professor of history and law at Cedarville University, said.

Parents charged in Michigan school shooting vanish; attorney says they aren’t on the run

Clauson said getting the jury to believe the facts when applied to the law will be challenging.

“It’s always difficult to tie the actions of the person who did something to the parents or somebody else, who simply had a hand in it somehow, tangentially,” Clauson explained.

While the facts of this case may not stand up in court, Hoffmeister hopes this move to punish the parents will spark change in gun laws.

“Start passing gun safety laws where people will actually have a requirement. There’s no requirement to secure your weapon in Michigan, so I’d like to see some gun safety laws and hopefully that will happen,” Hoffmeister said.

WDTN NBC Channel 2
Published 15 hours ago

Penobscots don't want ancestors' scalping to be whitewashed

Indigenous History Dawn Neptune Adams holds a copy of the Phips Proclamation of 1755, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021, in Bangor, Maine. Adams recently co-directed a film that focuses on the proclamation, one of the dozens of government-issued bounty proclamations that directed colonial settlers to hunt, scalp and kill Indigenous people for money. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty) (Robert F. Bukaty)

December 04, 2021 at 7:54 am EST
By DAVID SHARP

PORTLAND, Maine — (AP) — Most Americans know Native Americans endured atrocities after the arrival of European settlers: wars, disease, stolen land.

But it’s far uglier than that.

Members of the Penobscot Nation in Maine have produced an educational film addressing how European settlers scalped — killed — Indigenous people during the British colonial era, spurred for decades by cash bounties and with the government’s blessing.

“It was genocide,” said Dawn Neptune Adams, one of the three Penobscot Nation members featured in the film, called “Bounty.”

She said the point of the effort isn’t to make any Americans feel defensive or blamed. The filmmakers say they simply want to ensure this history isn’t whitewashed by promoting a fuller understanding of the nation’s past.

At the heart of the project is a chilling declaration by Spencer Phips, lieutenant governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay.

Issued in November 1755, it gave “His Majesty’s Subjects” license to kill Penobscots for “this entire month.” The reward was about $12,000 in today’s dollars for the scalp of a man, and half that for a woman’s scalp. The amount was slightly less for a child. Settlers who killed Indigenous people were sometimes rewarded with land, in addition to money, expanding settlers’ reach while displacing tribes from their ancestral lands.

The declaration is familiar to many Penobscots because a copy of the document was displayed at the tribal offices at Indian Island, Maine.

“If every American knew the whole history of this country, even the dark and uncomfortable parts, it would help us to get along better and to understand each other better,” said Maulian Dana, who co-directed the film with Neptune Adams.

Both Europeans and Native Americans engaged in scalping, but English colonists greatly expanded the practice when the government sanctioned the effort with bounties, the filmmakers said.

The first known colonial scalping order is from 1675. That’s just a few short decades after the first Thanksgiving in 1621, when Pilgrims gathered with Wampanoag people for a harvest celebration, said Chris Newell, who is Passamaquoddy and wrote “If You Lived During the Plimoth Thanksgiving.”

All told, there were more than 70 bounty proclamations encouraging white colonists to kill tribal members in what’s now New England, and another 50 government-sanctioned proclamations elsewhere across the country, the filmmakers’ research found. State and colonial governments paid out at least 375 bounties for Indigenous people across New England between 1675 to 1760, they said.

Emerson Baker, a Salem State University professor who specializes in New England history, called the tribal education effort “a powerful course correction.”

“Most people realize that Native Americans were here first and that the colonists did their best to remove them from the land. They just have no idea of the extremes that it took,” Baker said. “Pretty much any Native American man, woman or child was considered fair game at times, and sometimes by the government.”

Collaborating with the Massachusetts-based Upstander Project, the filmmakers released “Bounty” in November during National Native American Heritage Month.

Neptune Adams and Dana, along with Tim Shay and their families, were filmed at the Old State House in Boston. It’s the same location where Lt. Gov. Phips’ scalping order was signed.

In “Bounty,” the three participants describe having nightmares of Penobscots being chased through the woods, and discuss the dehumanization and massacre of their people.

“When you learn about a people’s humanity, that affects how you treat my kids, how you vote on public policy, how you may view my people,” Dana said.

Accompanying the short video is a 200-page study guide aimed at teachers. Several school districts, including Portland Public Schools in Maine’s largest city, are purchasing licenses for the video and plan to use the study guides to assist instruction.

In Portland, the scalp bounties will be included as one element in a curriculum that will bring the school district into compliance with a 2001 law requiring students to be taught Wabanaki Studies focusing on Native Americans in Maine, said Fiona Hopper, social studies teacher leader and Wabanaki studies coordinator.

“Students and teachers will see in ‘Bounty’ the ongoing endurance and resistance of Penobscot Nation citizens,” Hopper said.

___

Follow David Sharp on Twitter at https://twitter.com/David_Sharp_AP

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Latest Trending

WHIO 1290 AM/95.7 FM
Published 15 hours ago

Iowa high school basketball player arrested after violent attack during handshakes is caught on video

CARLISLE, Iowa (WHOTV) – A high school basketball player in Iowa is facing felony charges after a violent incident at the end of Tuesday’s game was caught on video.

The Carlisle Police Department identified their suspect as 17-year-old Carter Prenosil, a senior on Carlisle High School’s basketball team.

Police believe Prenosil knocked out a player on the opposing Nevada High School team with a punch to the head as the two squads lined up to shake hands after the game. Prenosil now faces a felony charge of willful injury for the incident.

Viral video of the attack allegedly shows Prenosil sucker-punch his opponent, hitting him once in the stomach and then in the face.

According to the criminal complaint, the Nevada player suffered a concussion and a cut to the lip that required four stitches.

In a statement, Nevada School Superintendent Steve Gray called the incident “a very unfortunate and disturbing situation.” He said the injured Nevada athlete is expected to recover.

Carlisle School Superintendent Bryce Amos expressed his frustration about the fight in his statement.

Amos said, in part:

This is without question an unfortunate incident which is not representative of the school culture that exists in Carlisle…this type of conduct is not tolerated within the Carlisle Community School District.
Bryce Amos, Carlisle School Superintendent

In addition to the fight between Carlisle and Nevada, the handshake line of the basketball game between East Union and Diagonal also ended in an altercation caught on camera.

The Iowa High School Athletic Association addressed both incidents in a statement:

We’re obviously disappointed to see multiple instances of violent conduct take place on the opening nights of the 2021-22 basketball season. Violent conduct has no place in Iowa high school activities. IHSAA administrators are working with involved schools to ensure appropriate guidelines are followed for violent behaviors from student-athletes, and that appropriate action is taken at the local level.
Chris Cuellar, Iowa High School Athletic Association

WCMH NBC 4 Columbus
Published 15 hours ago

Parents captured after son charged in Oxford school shooting

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, officials said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in a commercial building in Detroit that housed artwork, Detroit Police Chief James E. White told a news conference. White said the couple “were aided in getting into the building,” and that a person who helped them may also face charges.

A Detroit business owner spotted a car tied to the Crumbleys in his parking lot late Friday, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A woman seen near the vehicle ran away when the business owner called 911, McCabe said. The couple was later located and arrested by Detroit police.

A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the Crumbleys on Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.

The Crumbleys committed “egregious” acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

Authorities had been looking for the couple since Friday afternoon. Late Friday, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to their arrests.

The Crumbley’s attorney, Shannon Smith, said the pair had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety.” Smith told The Associated Press they would be returning to Oxford to be arraigned.

However, White said the Crumbleys “appeared to be hiding” in the building where they were found. He added that the parents appeared to be “distressed” when they were captured.

“Head down… just very upset,” he said of one of the parents.

The couple was expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail, McCabe said.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He’s charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a “war zone” and won’t be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, “No discipline was warranted.”

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. … I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah,” she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”

WCMH NBC 4 Columbus
Published 15 hours ago

Sports success bring out good in communities

Dec 04, 2021 7:30 AM

A community feel.

It doesn’t matter if I’m sitting in a meeting in one of our cities, walking around downtown or catching a parade at one of our smaller towns and villages.

There is a special community feel here that extends beyond small town. It’s one of the reasons I feel so comfortable living somewhere I didn’t grow up, even if I do prefer the Maize and Blue to the Scarlet and Grey. (Sorry, I had to go there!)

The area this feel most exists is in the schools.

I’ve always been a big fan of high school sports. As a child, I’d chart out the schedules and results of the local teams, begging my dad to take me to games on weekend nights.

So it’s been exciting to see the success of our local teams. I saw the Clyde community rally behind the 2019 football state champions. I saw it with Calvert and the 2020 volleyball state title. And I saw it just a few weeks ago with Liberty-Benton’s 2021 volleyball state title. I watched it as Columbian marched farther in the football playoffs than it ever had in 2020, winning four straight home games to capture the regional title.

And this year — a tremendous year on the local gridiron — I saw it in places like Hopewell-Loudon, Ottawa-Glandorf and Findlay, all of whom took extended runs through the playoffs, with H-L and O-G making it to the state semifinals.

And I’ve seen it no more than in Carey, who battles Coldwater at 3 p.m. today for a shot at the Blue Devils’ first state championship since 1975.

The Blue Devils have been on an upward trajectory for years under coach Jonathon Mershman, and it has all culminated in a shocking jaunt through the Division 6 bracket the past five weeks.

The Blue Devils are going to win or they are going to lose today. But this has been a galvanizing effort for tight-knit Carey. The early week saw students painting blue-and-white messages on the windows of local businesses, many of whom announced they will be closed today for the big game played two hours away at Canton’s Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium.

You want to see a quiet place? Drive through downtown Carey late this afternoon.

These teams always have heartwarming stories of family. Many of the current Blue Devils had fathers who played football and parents who are Carey grads.

I think of the Steen family. Dave Steen was a former Carey standout in his own right, and serves as the Blue Devils’ special teams coordinator. His son, Drew, is a senior stalwart on the team’s defensive line. His middle son, Luke, is a freshman on the varsity team; while his youngest son, Eli, serves as a water boy on the sidelines.

All teams have stories just like these, and they are small pieces of what creates that close-knit feel. Even so, a galvanizing run like this is thicker than blood. Family is a unit also built through community, a unit that includes the team, cheerleaders, band, parents, fans and the town at large.

When I was a junior in high school, my school had a tremendous hockey team. I did not play, but had many friends on the squad. I remember trekking three hours to see my team play in the state finals, thousands of people in my town doing the same thing. It was awesome, and one of the best moments of my high school life.

It’s good to see communities in our neck of the woods having the same kind of experiences. Schools are the centerpiece of our local communities, and it’s great to see galvanization and excitement.

Good luck, Blue Devils!

Speer is the publisher of The Courier, Findlay; The Advertiser-Tribune, Tiffin; and Review Times, Fostoria. He can be reached at jeremyspeer@thecourier.com or jspeer@advertiser-tribune.com

Findlay Courier
Published 16 hours ago

H.S. Results 12/2-12/3

PREP RESULTS

ST. EDWARD 23, SPRINGFIELD 13

SE 7 9 7 0 - 23

Sp 0 7 0 6 – 13

First Quarter

SE: Enovitch 17 run (kick).

Second Quarter

Sp: Safety.

SE: Goodall 19 pass from Ramos (kick).

Sp: Smoot 9 run (Yost kick).

Third Quarter

SE: Enovitch 9 run (kick).

Fourth Quarter

Sp: Brown 20 pass from Smoot (kick fail).

Division III

CHARDON 21, BADIN 14

C 7 0 7 7 – 21

B 0 7 7 0 – 14

First Quarter

C: Sulka 36 pass from Henry (Tager kick).

Second Quarter

B: Walsh 3 run (Niesen kick).

Third Quarter

C: Bruce 27 run (Tager kick).

B: Russo 6 run (Niesen kick).

Fourth Quarter

C: Carr 2 run (Tager kick).

Division IV

CLINTON-MASSIE 29, URSULINE 28

U 0 21 7 0 – 28

CM 7 0 7 15 – 29

First Quarter

CM: VanHoose 2 run (McGuinness kick).

Second Quarter

U: McElroy 34 run (Smith kick).

U: McElroy 1 run (Donlow run).

U: Irving 39 pass from Shannon (pass fail).

Third Quarter

U: Boyd 26 pass from Shannon (Smith kick).

CM: Zantene 49 run (McGuinness kick).

Fourth Quarter

CM: Vance 1 run (McGuinness kick).

CM: Zantene 1 run (VanHoose run).

Thursday’s Final

Division II

WINTON WOODS 21, AKRON HOBAN 10

AH 0 3 7 0 – 10

WW 0 14 7 0 – 21

Second Quarter

AH: Durkin 20 FG.

WW: Ellery 4 run (Dombele kick).

WW: Spikes 2 run (Dombele kick).

Third Quarter

AH: Kepler 22 fumble return (Durkin kick).

WW: Spears 53 run (Dombele kick).

Boys Basketball

Friday’s Results

Alter 58, Moeller 51: Mahaffey (M) 24, Mukes (M) 14, Conner (A) 20, Ruffolo (A) 13, Chew (A) 11.

Bellbrook 69, Eaton 49: Driskell (B) 18, Fugate (B) 13, Pavlak (B) 11.

Bradford 59, National Trail 46

Butler 42, Stebbins 40

Catholic Central 65, Cedarville 50

Cin. Country Day 57, Cin. Christian 43: Parnell (CC) 17, Rogers (CC) 12.

Dixie 59, Ansonia 50

Dunbar 74, Belmont 43: Allen (D) 20, Martin (D) 11, Hatcher (D) 10.

Elder 56, Fenwick 37

Emmanuel Christian 61, Miami Valley 21: Channels (EC) 19, Lawrence (EC) 13.

Fairfield 68, Colerain 20: Crim (F) 17, Tolbert (F) 13.

Greeneview 50, Greenon 44: Minteer (Gn) 17, Journell (Gn) 11, Williams (Gv) 12, Erisman (Gv) 12, Caudell (Gv) 12.

Greenville 55, Fairborn 42: Williams (F) 15, Bush (F) 12.

Indian Hill 56, Northwest 46

Indian Lake 67, Northwestern 48

Lakota East 84, Hamilton 70: Matthews (H) 28, Givens (H) 21, Coles (LE) 21, Kronauge (LE) 18, Peck (LE) 18.

Lakota West 71, Mason 50: Morton (M) 14, Middleton (M) 11, Layfield (LW) 18, Dudukovich (LW) 16, Lavender (LW) 15.

Meadowdale 56, Thurgood Marshall 43

Mechanicsburg 49, Triad 47

Milton-Union 47, Lehman Catholic 25: Chapman (LC) 12, Brumbaugh (MU) 18.

Monroe 61, Valley View 52

North Union 49, Graham 48

Northridge 50, Miami East 48: Enis (ME) 16, Apple (ME) 10, Roeth (ME) 14, Davis (N) 17, Jacobs (N) 17.

Oakwood 68, Brookville 40

Ponitz 54, Stivers 42

Princeton 67, Oak Hills 52

Springboro 51, Beavercreek 45

Springfield Shawnee 63, Kenton Ridge 51

Sycamore 63, Middletown 50: Hall (S) 11, Bolden (S) 12, Southerland (S) 14, Hall (M) 23.

Tecumseh 57, Bellefontaine 42

Troy 66, West Carrollton 55

Troy Christian 57, Covington 35: Miller (C) 12, Penrod (TC) 14.

Twin Valley South 71, Newton 58: Peters (N) 19, Oburn (N) 13.

Urbana 63, Ben Logan 38: Rogan (U) 19, Dixon (U) 15, Donahoe (U) 10, Arn (BL) 10.

Wayne 59, Miamisburg 53

Waynesville 57, Carlisle 38: Mitchell (W) 16, Potter (W) 13.

Yellow Springs 55, Dayton Christian 50

Girls Basketball

Thursday’s Results

Arcanum 67, Preble Shawnee 43: Jewell (PS) 14.

Bethel 43, Covington 38: Harrington (C) 15, Moore (B) 19.

Bradford 35, National Trail 25: Miller (B) 14, Canan (B) 12.

Dixie 46, Ansonia 30

Legacy Christian 56, Jefferson 9

Mississinawa Valley 60, Franklin Monroe 34

Oakwood 45, Brookville 26

Tri-Village 74, Tri-County North 19

Waynesville 57, Eaton 50: VanSchaik (W) 19, Cassoni (W) 14, Whitaker (W) 10.

West Liberty-Salem 62, Triad 12

Boys Bowling

Friday’s Results

Dayton Christian 1755, Northeastern 1682: Bartley (DC) 305 series.

Thursday’s Results

Carroll 2657, Valley View 1595: Bui (C) 444 series, Brust (C) 422 series.

Greeneview 1793, Legacy Christian 1516: Brennaman (G) 450 series.

Greenville 1845, Trotwood 1388

Southeastern 1846, Dayton Christian 1600: Withers (DC) 309 series, Bartley (DC) 288 series.

Girls Bowling

Friday’s Results

Northeastern 1637, Dayton Christian 1200: Millar (DC) 230 series, Brown (DC) 214 series.

Thursday’s Results

Carroll 1879, Valley View 1520: Duff (VV) 311 series, Sharp (C) 322 series.

Greenville 1409, Trotwood 1234

Ross 1974, Carroll 1875: Carli (R) 323 series, Sharp (C) 331 series.

Southeastern 1329, Dayton Christian 1199: Millar (DC) 126 game.

Wrestling

Friday’s Results

Centerville 48, Lancaster 30

Thursday’s Results

Northmont 57, Oakwood 10

REPORTING RESULTS

Contact Dayton Daily News, Springfield News-Sun and Journal-News with scores and results as soon as possible after varsity high school athletic contests by email only at COPSports@coxinc.com. Please include any details from your contest that you would like published along with a contact name and phone number.

Dayton Daily News
Published 16 hours ago

EXPLAINER: How unusual to charge parents in school shooting?

Caption

Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald addresses the media in her office, Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Pontiac, Mich. McDonald filed involuntary manslaughter charges against Jennifer and James Crumbley, the parents of 15-year-old Ethan Crumbley, who is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school. McDonald says the gun used in the shootings at Oxford High School was purchased by James Crumbley a week ago and given to the boy. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

Credit: Carlos Osorio

Credit: Carlos Osorio

Nation & World

By ED WHITE, Associated Press

10 hours ago

Experts say guns used in U.S. school shootings have often come from the homes of young perpetrators

Guns used in U.S. school shootings have often come from the homes of young perpetrators, but parents are rarely charged for the violence that occurs, experts say.

That's what makes the case against Ethan Crumbley's parents uncommon, following the fatal shooting of four students at Oxford High School in southeastern Michigan. Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said Jennifer and James Crumbley ignored opportunities to intervene, just a few hours before the bloodshed.

They're charged with four counts of involuntary manslaughter, while Ethan, 15, is charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

The Crumbley parents and their lawyers haven't commented on the shooting or the charges.

Here's a look at the issues facing the parents:

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE GUN?

The semi-automatic handgun used in the shooting Tuesday was purchased legally by James Crumbley on Nov. 26 while his son stood by at the shop, according to investigators.

Over the Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley referred to it on social media as a “Christmas present” for her son, and Ethan posted a picture of it on social media, calling it his “new beauty,” McDonald said.

With some very limited exceptions, minors in Michigan aren't allowed to possess guns. But there is no Michigan law that requires owners to keep guns locked away from kids.

“So many states do. There’s 23 states plus Washington, D.C., that have some form of a secure storage law,” Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel said.

WILL INVOLUNTARY MANSLAUGHTER BE TOUGH TO PROVE?

“It's an unusual charge to bring,” said Eve Brensike Primus, who teaches criminal procedure at University of Michigan law school.

Police said Ethan Crumbley emerged from a bathroom and started shooting other students in the hallway at Oxford High. A few hours earlier, he and his parents had met with school officials. A teacher had found a drawing on his desk with a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” according to the prosecutor.

Ethan, who had no disciplinary record, was told to get counseling but was allowed to stay in school. His backpack was not checked for a weapon, McDonald said.

Primus said authorities must show gross negligence by the parents and causation, or the act of causing something.

“The prosecutor is going to need facts to support the argument that these parents really knew there was a risk that their son would take a gun and shoot people dead,” she said. “Not just that their son was troubled in some way. This is a homicide charge that carries years in prison. This is not a small charge."

In 2000, a Flint-area man pleaded no contest to involuntary manslaughter after a 6-year-old boy who was living with him found a gun in a shoebox and killed a classmate.

WHY AREN'T PARENTS CHARGED MORE OFTEN?

A 2019 assessment by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security found that guns came from the home of a parent or close relative in 76% of school attacks where firearms were used. In about half, the firearms were easily accessible.

But laws aimed at restricting gun access are not always enforced and vary in strength, experts say.

“Our laws haven’t really adapted to the reality of school shootings, and the closest we have are these child access prevention laws,” said Kris Brown, president of the Brady gun control advocacy group

In 2020, the mother of an Indiana teen was placed on probation for failing to remove guns from her home after her mentally ill son threatened to kill students. He fired shots inside his school in 2018. No one was injured but the boy killed himself.

In Washington state, the father of a boy who killed four students at a high school in 2014 was convicted of illegally possessing firearms. He was not charged for the shooting, although one of his guns was used.

___

AP reporter Sophia Tareen in Chicago contributed to this story.

Caption

Three Oakland County Sheriff's deputies survey the grounds outside of the Crumbley residence while seeking James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of alleged Oxford High School shooter Ethan Crumbley, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Oxford, Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Three Oakland County Sheriff's deputies survey the grounds outside of the Crumbley residence while seeking James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of alleged Oxford High School shooter Ethan Crumbley, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Oxford, Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Three Oakland County Sheriff's deputies survey the grounds outside of the Crumbley residence while seeking James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of alleged Oxford High School shooter Ethan Crumbley, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Oxford, Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

Three Oakland County Sheriff's deputies survey the grounds outside of the Crumbley residence while seeking James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of alleged Oxford High School shooter Ethan Crumbley, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Oxford, Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

An Oakland County Sheriff's deputy, left, and an Oxford police officer search the grounds outside of the Crumbley residence while seeking James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of alleged Oxford High School shooter Ethan Crumbley, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

An Oakland County Sheriff's deputy, left, and an Oxford police officer search the grounds outside of the Crumbley residence while seeking James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of alleged Oxford High School shooter Ethan Crumbley, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Dayton Daily News
Published 16 hours ago

Honolulu utility shuts well to prevent fuel contamination

Caption

This photo shows a tunnel inside the Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on Jan. 26, 2018. The state of Hawaii says a laboratory has detected petroleum product in a water sample from an elementary school near Pearl Harbor. The news comes amid heightened concerns that fuel from the massive Navy storage facility may contaminate Oahu's water supply. (U.S. Navy via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Nation & World

By AUDREY McAVOY, Associated Press

Updated 9 hours ago

Honolulu’s water utility is shutting down one of its wells so it doesn’t pull petroleum from an underground aquifer it shares with the Navy and deliver it to its own customers

HONOLULU (AP) — Amid a continuing crisis over fuel contaminating the Navy’s tap water at Pearl Harbor, Honolulu’s water utility said Friday it shut off one of its wells so it doesn’t taint its own supply with petroleum from an underground aquifer it shares with the military.

The Honolulu Board of Water Supply said it acted shortly after the Navy on Thursday disclosed that a water sample from one of its wells had shown the presence of petroleum. The well is near a giant World War II-era underground fuel tank complex that has been the source of multiple fuel leaks over the years.

The tap water problems have afflicted one of the military's most important bases, home to submarines, ships and the commander of U.S. forces in the Indo-Pacific region. They also threaten to jeopardize one of Honolulu’s most important aquifers and water sources.

Nearly 1,000 military households have complained about their tap water smelling like fuel, or of physical ailments like stomach cramps and vomiting. The Navy water system serves 93,000 people.

The Navy said Thursday it would flush clean water through its distribution system to clear residual petroleum products from the water. The process, followed by testing to make sure the water meets Environmental Protection Agency drinking standards, could take four to 10 days.

The Navy said it will investigate how contaminants got into the well and fix it.

In the meantime, military officials say they will help affected families move into hotels or new homes.

Ernie Lau, the Board of Water Supply's chief engineer, said he's worried the utility could pull contaminated water through the porous lava rock that forms the aquifer, and deliver it to its customers. Because the Navy shut down its well, there's a chance water would travel to the utility's Halawa well from the area of the Navy's well more quickly if the utility continued to pump.

The utility's Halawa well produces 10 million gallons (37.8 million liters) a day under normal conditions, supplying 20% of the water serving urban Honolulu. The utility will draw on other wells in the meantime and will only run its Halawa well to test the water for contamination, Lau said.

To protect Oahu's water, Lau urged the Navy to remove the risk posed by the Red Hill Fuel Storage Facility. It consists of 20 aging tanks, each as tall as a 25-story building, that were built in the early 1940s.

“We cannot wait any longer,” Lau said as he choked up during a news conference. “The water resource is precious. It’s irreplaceable. There is no substitute for pure water, and our lives depend upon it.”

He noted Honolulu relies on groundwater for all of its water needs.

At Cheri Burness' home, her dog was the first to signal something was wrong when it stopped drinking the family's tap water two weeks ago. Burness started feeling stomach cramps and her 12-year-old daughter became nauseous not long after.

“It was just getting worse every day,” said Burness, whose husband is in the Navy.

The Navy has since started distributing bottled water and said Marines would set up showers and laundry facilities connected to clean water. It is also setting up dedicated medical clinics.

Environmental and Native Hawaiian groups, meanwhile, are demanding a meeting with Navy Secretary Carlos Del Toro. He's scheduled to visit Hawaii next week to attend a ceremony marking the 80th anniversary of the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor.

Burness has been frustrated with the Navy's response, which she believes has been dismissive of families' concerns. She pointed to a Monday email from the commander of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam that told residents the Navy was testing water samples but it had no immediate indication the water wasn't safe. His email said he and his staff were drinking the water.

“All they had to do was say, ‘We see that there’s a problem, we don’t know what it is, and we’re going to do whatever it takes to find out and fix it.’ That’s all they had to do. And instead, we got: ‘Nope. Looks good. Smells fine. Bye,'” Burness said.

Navy Region Hawaii, which oversees all Navy installations in the state, said the commander's email was sent when “numbers of concerns were still very low.”

“Since then, the Navy has aggressively increased sampling, testing, communication to families and others impacted, as well as started response teams of experts to address the issues we all are facing,” the command said in a statement.

The most recent leak from the Red Hill Fuel Storage Facility occurred last month. The Navy said on Nov. 22 that a water and fuel mixture had leaked into a fire suppression system drain line in a tunnel. The Navy said it removed about 14,000 gallons (53,000 liters) of the mixture, and said the liquid hadn’t leaked into the environment.

The fuel tanks sit 100 feet (30 meters) above the aquifer. Last month, the Sierra Club of Hawaii and other environmental groups called on the government to shut the tanks down.

U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono of Hawaii indicated decommissioning the tanks was a possibility, telling a conference call with reporters that “all options are on the table.” But she said first she wanted to focus on making sure people were getting safe water for drinking and other daily needs.

“When people are smelling fuel in their water, this is totally abnormal, totally unacceptable,” said Hirono, a Democrat who chairs the Senate Armed Services Committee's subcommittee on seapower.

Hirono said she's asked the Navy to give her a classified briefing on their fuel needs.

Caption

This 2021 photo provided by Cheri Burness shows Burness and her family, including dog Lilikoi, in a car in Honolulu. Hundreds of military families living near Pearl Harbor have complained of stomach pain, nausea and other health ailments amid concerns the Navy's water system may have been contaminated by a fuel leak.(Cheri Burness via AP)

Credit: Cheri Burness

Caption

This 2021 photo provided by Cheri Burness shows Burness and her family, including dog Lilikoi, in a car in Honolulu. Hundreds of military families living near Pearl Harbor have complained of stomach pain, nausea and other health ailments amid concerns the Navy's water system may have been contaminated by a fuel leak.(Cheri Burness via AP)

Credit: Cheri Burness

Credit: Cheri Burness

Caption

This provided by Cheri Burness shows Miranda Burness and the family dog Lilikoi in car in Honolulu on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021. Hundreds of military families living near Pearl Harbor have complained of stomach pain, nausea and other health ailments amid concerns the Navy's water system may have been contaminated by a fuel leak.(Cheri Burness via AP)

Credit: Cheri Burness

Caption

This provided by Cheri Burness shows Miranda Burness and the family dog Lilikoi in car in Honolulu on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021. Hundreds of military families living near Pearl Harbor have complained of stomach pain, nausea and other health ailments amid concerns the Navy's water system may have been contaminated by a fuel leak.(Cheri Burness via AP)

Credit: Cheri Burness

Credit: Cheri Burness

Caption

This 2021 photo provided by Cheri Burness shows Burness and her family, including dog Lilikoi, in car in Honolulu. Hundreds of military families living near Pearl Harbor have complained of stomach pain, nausea and other health ailments amid concerns the Navy's water system may have been contaminated by a fuel leak.(Cheri Burness via AP)

Credit: Cheri Burness

Credit: Cheri Burness

Dayton Daily News
Published 16 hours ago

SKorea sets daily records for new coronavirus cases, deaths

Caption

A visitor wearing a face mask as a precaution against the coronavirus, walks near a banner at a park in Goyang, South Korea, Saturday, Dec. 4, 2021. South Korea again broke its daily records for coronavirus infections and deaths and confirmed three more cases of the new omicron variant as officials scramble to tighten social distancing and border controls. The banner reads "Mandatory mask wearing." (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Credit: Lee Jin-man

Credit: Lee Jin-man

Nation & World

By KIM TONG-HYUNG, Associated Press

Updated 8 hours ago

South Korea has reported daily records in coronavirus infections and deaths and confirmed three more cases of the new omicron variant as officials scramble to tighten social distancing and border controls

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea again broke its daily records for coronavirus infections and deaths and confirmed three more cases of the new omicron variant as officials scramble to tighten social distancing and border controls.

The 5,352 new cases reported by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency on Saturday marked the third time this week the daily tally exceeded 5,000. The country’s death toll was at 3,809 after a record 70 virus patients died in the past 24 hours, while the 752 patients in serious or critical conditions were also an all-time high.

As the delta-driven surge threatens to overwhelm hospital systems, there is also concern about the local spread of the omicron variant, which is seen as potentially more infectious than previous strains of the virus.

The country’s omicron caseload is now at nine after KDCA confirmed three more cases. The new cases include the wife, mother-in-law and a friend of a man who caught omicron from a couple he drove home from the airport after they arrived from Nigeria on Nov. 24. The couple’s teenage child and two other women who also traveled to Nigeria have also been infected with omicron.

Officials say the number of omicron cases could rise as some of the patients had attended a church gathering involving hundreds of people on Nov. 28.

While the emergence of omicron has triggered global alarm and pushed governments around the world to tighten their borders, scientists say it remains unclear whether the new variant is more contagious, more likely to evade the protection provided by vaccines or more likely to cause serious illnesses than previous versions of the virus.

Starting next week, private social gatherings of seven or more people will be banned in the densely populated capital Seoul and nearby metropolitan areas, which have been hit hardest by delta and are now running out of intensive care units.

To fend off omicron, South Korea has required all passengers arriving from abroad over the next two weeks to quarantine for at least 10 days, regardless of their nationality or vaccination status. The country has banned short-term foreign travelers arriving from nine African nations, including South Africa and Nigeria.

Caption

Bottles of hand sanitizer are placed for public use to prevent from the coronavirus at a park in Goyang, South Korea, Saturday, Dec. 4, 2021. South Korea again broke its daily records for coronavirus infections and deaths and confirmed three more cases of the new omicron variant as officials scramble to tighten social distancing and border controls. The letters read "Hand sanitizer to prevent the COVID-19." (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Credit: Lee Jin-man

Caption

Bottles of hand sanitizer are placed for public use to prevent from the coronavirus at a park in Goyang, South Korea, Saturday, Dec. 4, 2021. South Korea again broke its daily records for coronavirus infections and deaths and confirmed three more cases of the new omicron variant as officials scramble to tighten social distancing and border controls. The letters read "Hand sanitizer to prevent the COVID-19." (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Credit: Lee Jin-man

Credit: Lee Jin-man

Caption

Visitors wearing face masks as a precaution against the coronavirus, rest at a park in Goyang, South Korea, Saturday, Dec. 4, 2021. South Korea again broke its daily records for coronavirus infections and deaths and confirmed three more cases of the new omicron variant as officials scramble to tighten social distancing and border controls. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Credit: Lee Jin-man

Caption

Visitors wearing face masks as a precaution against the coronavirus, rest at a park in Goyang, South Korea, Saturday, Dec. 4, 2021. South Korea again broke its daily records for coronavirus infections and deaths and confirmed three more cases of the new omicron variant as officials scramble to tighten social distancing and border controls. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Credit: Lee Jin-man

Credit: Lee Jin-man

Caption

Visitors wearing face masks as a precaution against the coronavirus, walk at a park in Goyang, South Korea, Saturday, Dec. 4, 2021. South Korea again broke its daily records for coronavirus infections and deaths and confirmed three more cases of the new omicron variant as officials scramble to tighten social distancing and border controls. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Credit: Lee Jin-man

Caption

Visitors wearing face masks as a precaution against the coronavirus, walk at a park in Goyang, South Korea, Saturday, Dec. 4, 2021. South Korea again broke its daily records for coronavirus infections and deaths and confirmed three more cases of the new omicron variant as officials scramble to tighten social distancing and border controls. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Credit: Lee Jin-man

Credit: Lee Jin-man

Caption

A medical worker wearing protective gear in a booth, takes sample from a man at a temporary screening clinic for the coronavirus in Seoul, South Korea, Saturday, Dec. 4, 2021. South Korea again broke its daily records for coronavirus infections and deaths and confirmed three more cases of the new omicron variant as officials scramble to tighten social distancing and border controls. (Park Mi-so/Newsis via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

A medical worker wearing protective gear in a booth, takes sample from a man at a temporary screening clinic for the coronavirus in Seoul, South Korea, Saturday, Dec. 4, 2021. South Korea again broke its daily records for coronavirus infections and deaths and confirmed three more cases of the new omicron variant as officials scramble to tighten social distancing and border controls. (Park Mi-so/Newsis via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

Students wait in line to receive the coronavirus tests at a makeshift clinic set up on a playground of a high school in Gwangju, South Korea, Friday, Dec. 3, 2021. (Jo Nam-soo/Yonhap via AP)

Credit: Jo Nam-soo

Credit: Jo Nam-soo

Dayton Daily News
Published 16 hours ago

Parents captured after son charged in Oxford school shooting

Caption

James, left, and Jennifer Crumbley are shown during the video arraignment of their son, Ethan Crumbley in Rochester Hills, Mich., on Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against the Crumbleys whose 15-year-old son is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school. (

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Nation & World

By COREY WILLIAMS and ED WHITE, Associated Press

Updated 1 hour ago

A sheriff's office in Michigan says the parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a high school have been caught early Saturday

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, officials said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in a commercial building in Detroit that housed artwork, Detroit Police Chief James E. White told a news conference. White said the couple “were aided in getting into the building,” and that a person who helped them may also face charges.

A Detroit business owner spotted a car tied to the Crumbleys in his parking lot late Friday, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A woman seen near the vehicle ran away when the business owner called 911, McCabe said. The couple was later located and arrested by Detroit police.

A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the Crumbleys on Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.

The Crumbleys committed "egregious" acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

Authorities had been looking for the couple since Friday afternoon. Late Friday, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to their arrests.

The Crumbley's attorney, Shannon Smith, said the pair had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety.” Smith told The Associated Press they would be returning to Oxford to be arraigned.

However, White said the Crumbleys “appeared to be hiding” in the building where they were found. He added that the parents appeared to be “distressed” when they were captured.

“Head down... just very upset,” he said of one of the parents.

The couple was expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail, McCabe said.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He's charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a "war zone" and won't be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, “No discipline was warranted.”

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. ... I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah,” she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”

___

White reported from Detroit. Associated Press journalist Mike Householder in Detroit and David Eggert in Lansing, Mich., also contributed to this report.

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows James Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows James Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows Jennifer Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows Jennifer Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

An Oakland County Sheriff's deputy, left, and an Oxford police officer search the grounds outside of the Crumbley residence while seeking James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of alleged Oxford High School shooter Ethan Crumbley, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

An Oakland County Sheriff's deputy, left, and an Oxford police officer search the grounds outside of the Crumbley residence while seeking James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of alleged Oxford High School shooter Ethan Crumbley, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Three Oakland County Sheriff's deputies survey the grounds outside of the Crumbley residence while seeking James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of alleged Oxford High School shooter Ethan Crumbley, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Oxford, Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Three Oakland County Sheriff's deputies survey the grounds outside of the Crumbley residence while seeking James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of alleged Oxford High School shooter Ethan Crumbley, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Oxford, Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

This booking photo released by the Oakland County, Mich., Sheriff's Office shows Ethan Crumbley, 15, who is charged as an adult with murder and terrorism for a shooting that killed four fellow students and injured more at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., authorities said Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. (Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This booking photo released by the Oakland County, Mich., Sheriff's Office shows Ethan Crumbley, 15, who is charged as an adult with murder and terrorism for a shooting that killed four fellow students and injured more at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., authorities said Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. (Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald addresses the media in her office, Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Pontiac, Mich. McDonald filed involuntary manslaughter charges against Jennifer and James Crumbley, the parents of 15-year-old Ethan Crumbley, who is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school. McDonald says the gun used in the shootings at Oxford High School was purchased by James Crumbley a week ago and given to the boy. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

Credit: Carlos Osorio

Caption

Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald addresses the media in her office, Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Pontiac, Mich. McDonald filed involuntary manslaughter charges against Jennifer and James Crumbley, the parents of 15-year-old Ethan Crumbley, who is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school. McDonald says the gun used in the shootings at Oxford High School was purchased by James Crumbley a week ago and given to the boy. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

Credit: Carlos Osorio

Credit: Carlos Osorio

Caption

Misia Winowski, center left, holds her 14-year-old daughter Madolyne close as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May | MLive.com) Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Misia Winowski, center left, holds her 14-year-old daughter Madolyne close as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May | MLive.com) Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

People gather alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

People gather alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

People gather alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

People gather alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Eighth-grader Laural Bird, 14, at left, holds a candle as her mother Tanya Bird closes her eyes in a group prayer with others gathered alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Eighth-grader Laural Bird, 14, at left, holds a candle as her mother Tanya Bird closes her eyes in a group prayer with others gathered alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

People gather alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

People gather alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Oxford residents Blaca Flores and Ashley Sefton place candles at the base of a Christmas tree in a public park Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Dayton Daily News
Published 16 hours ago

No. 14 Utah beats No. 10 Oregon 38-10 for 1st Rose Bowl bid

Caption

Utah linebacker Devin Lloyd, second from left, celebrates alongside coach Kyle Whittingham, left, quarterback Cameron Rising and wide receiver Britain Covey (18) after Utah defeated Oregon 38-10 to win the Pac-12 Conference championship NCAA college football game Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chase Stevens)

Credit: Chase Stevens

Credit: Chase Stevens

Nation & World

By JOSH DUBOW, Associated Press

Updated 5 hours ago

Devin Lloyd returned an interception for a touchdown, Cam Rising threw for another score and No. 14 Utah clinched the first Rose Bowl berth in school history with a 38-10 victory over No. 10 Oregon in the Pac-12 championship game

LAS VEGAS (AP) — As the Utah players celebrated the Pac-12 championship surrounded by roses and confetti, the memories of two teammates who couldn't share in the moment was paramount.

The past year marked by tragedy following the deaths of Ty Jordan and Aaron Lowe will end with the long-coveted Rose Bowl bid.

Devin Lloyd returned an interception for a touchdown, Cam Rising threw for another score and No. 14 Utah clinched the first Rose Bowl berth in school history with a 38-10 victory over No. 10 Oregon on Friday night.

“Our mantra after the tragedy was we’re not going to get over it, but we’ll get through it,” coach Kyle Whittingham said. “I believe our guys really did that and I couldn’t be more proud of them.”

Jordan died last Christmas from a self-inflicted gun shot wound. Lowe, who also played with Jordan in high school, was then shot and killed at a house party in September.

Their teammates used the memories as fuel for a season that ended with a title.

“We’ve got a lot of toughness in us and resiliency, said Lloyd, who was named MVP of the game. “But at the same time, I also believe that they were there guiding us throughout the whole season. They were able to help us create things that I don’t think we ever would have done without them.”

This game was a near carbon copy of the one in Salt Lake City two weeks ago when the Utes (10-3, No. 17 CFP) jumped out early and won 38-7.

While that game all but ended the playoff hopes for Oregon (10-3, No. 10), the rematch delivered the Utes the Rose Bowl prize they had been seeking since joining the Pac-12 in 2011.

Utah had lost its first two trips to the conference title game, including two years ago to Oregon, but left little doubt this time.

“We’ve just been working away on it ever since we joined the league,” Whittingham said. “This is the culmination of a lot of years of hard work and effort, not only by us, but everyone involved. It takes a lot of people to make this thing go.”

Rising engineered a TD drive on the opening possession after converting a sneak on fourth down near midfield. Tavon Thomas capped it with a 2-yard run.

Lloyd then returned an interception 34 yards for a score later in the first quarter and Utah put the game away by scoring twice in the final 27 seconds of the first half.

Rising hit Dalton Kincaid on an 11-yard pass with 27 seconds left. Then Malone Mataele intercepted an ill-advised pass from Anthony Brown to set up Jadon Redding's 50-yard field goal on the final play of the half to make it 23-0.

The Utes led the game two weeks ago 28-0 at the half.

“Honestly, it seemed kind of similar,” Ducks safety Verone McKinley III said. “It’s tough because we felt prepared. We felt we had a good game plan and then to let what happened happen again was a tough pill to swallow.”

Thomas and T.J. Pledger added TD runs in the second half for the Utes to the delight of the huge contingent of Utah fans among the 56,511 in attendance for the first title game in Las Vegas.

THE TAKEAWAY

Oregon: The Ducks had playoff aspirations after winning at Ohio State in September, but struggled to maintain that level of play. They were upset at Stanford on Oct. 2 before getting outscored 76-17 by Utah in two losses over the final three weeks and were denied a third straight conference title.

Utah: The Utes are playing as well as almost anybody in the country late in the season with six straight wins. But back-to-back losses in September to BYU and San Diego State before Rising took over as starting quarterback mean the Pac-12 champion will miss the College Football Playoff for a fifth straight season.

MOMENT OF LOUDNESS

There was an emotional moment during a break in the second quarter when the Utah fans took part in their ”moment of loudness" to honor Jordan and Lowe.

A video tribute was played as fans lit up the stadium with cell phone flashlights and cheered. The Utes have held the "moment of loudness" instead of moments of silence to honor the former players.

Lowe’s mom, Donna Lowe-Sterns, also served as an honorary captain for the game.

“We etched their name in history, too,” Rising said. “That’s what we talked about all year and we really wanted to get that done.”

CONTRACT TALK

The lead-up to the game was filled with talk about the future of Oregon coach Mario Cristobal. There were reports that Miami was making a run at Cristobal, who won two national titles there as a player, and that the Ducks are doing what it takes to keep him.

Cristobal said he has not talked to any other school and if he had any news he would announce it.

“Let’s not create narratives as we sit here in this press conference,” Cristobal said. “Oregon is working on some stuff for me, that’s what I have right now, and that’s the extent of that conversation.

UP NEXT

Oregon: A bowl game to be determined.

Utah: The Rose Bowl on Jan. 1 against a Big Ten team.

___

More AP college football: https://apnews.com/hub/college-football and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25. Sign up for the AP’s college football newsletter: https://apnews.com/cfbtop25

Caption

Utah quarterback Cameron Rising (7) scores a 2-point conversion against Oregon during the second half of the Pac-12 Conference championship NCAA college football game Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chase Stevens)

Credit: Chase Stevens

Caption

Utah quarterback Cameron Rising (7) scores a 2-point conversion against Oregon during the second half of the Pac-12 Conference championship NCAA college football game Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chase Stevens)

Credit: Chase Stevens

Credit: Chase Stevens

Caption

Utah offensive lineman Bamidele Olaseni lies in confetti on the field after Utah defeated Oregon 38-10 to win the Pac-12 Conference championship NCAA college football game Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chase Stevens)

Credit: Chase Stevens

Caption

Utah offensive lineman Bamidele Olaseni lies in confetti on the field after Utah defeated Oregon 38-10 to win the Pac-12 Conference championship NCAA college football game Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chase Stevens)

Credit: Chase Stevens

Credit: Chase Stevens

Caption

Utah running back Micah Bernard (2) celebrates with teammates after the team's 38-10 win over Oregon to win the Pac-12 Conference championship NCAA college football game Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chase Stevens)

Credit: Chase Stevens

Caption

Utah running back Micah Bernard (2) celebrates with teammates after the team's 38-10 win over Oregon to win the Pac-12 Conference championship NCAA college football game Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chase Stevens)

Credit: Chase Stevens

Credit: Chase Stevens

Caption

Utah wide receiver Britain Covey carries against Oregon during the first half of the Pac-12 Conference championship NCAA college football game Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chase Stevens)

Credit: Chase Stevens

Caption

Utah wide receiver Britain Covey carries against Oregon during the first half of the Pac-12 Conference championship NCAA college football game Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chase Stevens)

Credit: Chase Stevens

Credit: Chase Stevens

Caption

Oregon cornerback Trikweze Bridges (11) attempts to recover a fumble by Utah quarterback Cameron Rising, not seen, as Utah offensive lineman Sataoa Laumea (78) also looks to recover the ball during the first half of the Pac-12 Conference championship NCAA college football game Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chase Stevens)

Credit: Chase Stevens

Caption

Oregon cornerback Trikweze Bridges (11) attempts to recover a fumble by Utah quarterback Cameron Rising, not seen, as Utah offensive lineman Sataoa Laumea (78) also looks to recover the ball during the first half of the Pac-12 Conference championship NCAA college football game Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chase Stevens)

Credit: Chase Stevens

Credit: Chase Stevens

Caption

Utah tight end Dalton Kincaid (86) scores a touchdown past Oregon safety Jordan Happle (32) during the first half of the Pac-12 Conference championship NCAA college football game Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Chase Stevens)

Credit: Chase Stevens

Credit: Chase Stevens

Dayton Daily News
Published 16 hours ago

179th Airlift Wing welcomes new commander

Lou Whitmire
Mansfield News Journal

The new commander of the 179th Airlift Wing of the Ohio Air National Guard enlisted in the national guard in 1986 while still a student at Clear Fork High School.

A change of command ceremony was held Friday at the 179th Airlift Wing of the Ohio Air National Guard base.

Col. Darren E. Hamilton will transition the base to the new cyber wing mission.

"The flying missions will go away, which is tough for a lot of us," Hamilton said after the ceremony in Hangar 409 before a packed crowd.

"But we keep a mission. We keep the doors open. We keep recruiting people for futures in cyber. A lot of good jobs will come of it. A lot of good training for folks," he said.

Cyber warfare announcement:Portman tours 179th Airlift Wing on heels of new cyber warfare announcement

Flight was his destiny

Hamilton said he always knew he wanted to be a pilot, ever since he was a young kid.

"Bill Hunt was a crew chief out here years ago and he brought my grandfather and me out when I was a small child," Hamilton said. "Ever since I was little I wanted to fly airplanes."

Hamilton, former corporate pilot for Gorman Rupp and a former airline pilot, said the Mansfield wing is an "awesome wing with a great culture and great people."

"We've gone through a lot of changes but we'll get through this one and be the best cyber wing if that's our future in future years," Hamilton said.

Col. Todd K. Thomas retired and relinquished command of the 179th Airlift Wing to Hamilton at 3 p.m. on the air national guard base at Mansfield Lahm Airport, 1947 Harrington Memorial Road.

New mission:Mansfield Air Guard base selected for national cyber warfare mission

The journey through the ranks

Hamilton joined the 179th Airlift Wing in 1986, assigned as a crew chief on the C-130B aircraft. He attended training to become a C-130 flight engineer in 1989. He graduated from Kent State University in 1992 with a bachelor of science degree in aerospace technology.

Hamilton was awarded distinguished graduate of the Academy of Military Science in 1994. He attended undergraduate pilot training at Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi, followed by C-130 flight training at Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas.

He returned to the 179th Airlift Wing as a traditional guardsman.

He has served as a corporate pilot, airline pilot and as a dual status military technician with the 179th in a multitude of roles to include flight safety officer, training officer, assistant operations officer, and 164th Airlift Squadron commander.

He served as the Joint Force Headquarters Director of Operations Ohio (A3) before returning as the 179th Operations group commander.

He participated in Operations Restore Hope, Southern Watch, Joint Forge, Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom and Freedom Sentinel. He is a command pilot with over 5,000 hours in the T-41, T-37, T-38, C-130 B/E/H and C-27J aircraft.

He was surrounded by his wife Terri and their four children, Will, Evan, Wade and Amelia. Hamilton's many relatives including his mother, Betty Hamilton of Bellville, attended the ceremony along with his in-laws Bill Schmidt and his wife.

Thomas retires after distinguished career

Remarks were made by Brig Gen Gary McCue, who is deputy assistant adjutant general-Air, and a former commander of the 179th; and Thomas, who celebrated his retirement after 33 years service following the ceremony.

What airlift offers:Mansfield 179th commander: Base showed military brass capabilities the airlift wing offers

Thomas, a command pilot with more than 6,200 hours of flight time (including 465 combat hours) in the T-37, T-38, C-27J and C-130H aircraft, said he truly believes Hamilton is absolutely the right person at the right time and he couldn't be happier for the unit.

McCue presented the Legion of Merit to Thomas for exceptional, meritorious conduct to the United States, who also has numerous family members including his wife and two sons in attendance.

lwhitmir@gannett.com

419-521-7223

Twitter: @LWhitmir

Mansfield News Journal
Published 16 hours ago

Community calendar

Dec 04, 2021 4:00 AM

Sunday
*Santa at Simply Susan's, 12-3 p.m., 70 S. Washington St. Bring your camera.
*Holiday House Tour, 1-5 p.m., six different properties throughout Tiffin. For info, call (419) 618-0698.
*Seneca County Museum's Christmas Open House, 2-4 p.m., Barnes-Deinzer Seneca County Museum, 28 Clay St. Stop in to reminisce and enjoy a Christmas past with dulcimer music and festive décor. Music will be provided by the Goodtime String Band.
*Bascom Community Memory Tree Lighting Ceremony, 3 p.m., 5960 W. Tiffin St., Bascom.
*Luminary Walk, 6-8 p.m., Zimmerman Nature Preserve, 680 E. SR 18. Join Linda Rose and Angie Ford as you walk the paved path illuminated by luminaries, enjoying the night sky. End with warm refreshments at the picnic shelter. Registration required by email to Lrose@senecacountyparks.com.
*Live Nativity, St. Francis Campus, Event has been canceled.

Monday
*Make It At Home: Clothespin Snowflake, virtual craft. Tiffin-Seneca Public Library offers free supply kits and an instructional video on how to make a snowflake out of clothespins and can be found at tiffinsenecalibrary.org/decembermakeitathome.
*Public Health Nursing Services Clinic (vaccinations, lice checks, etc), 8-9 a.m., Seneca County General Health District, 71 S. Washington St., Suite 1102. Appointments only. Schedule by calling (419) 447-3691, ext 6333.
*Ecumenical Sharing Kitchen, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., St. Paul's United Methodist Church, 46 Madison St. All are welcome. For more info, call (419) 447-1743.
*Non-Food Pantry, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Lot 6 (corner of Market and Monroe streets) Free pre-bagged essentials. Curbside pick-up. Everyone is welcome.
*Toddler Trot — Cold Walk, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Garlo Heritage Nature Preserve, 6777 S. SR 19, Bloomville. Ages 18-36 months. Walk the trails observing what winter has done to the trees, plants, and animals. Registration required by email to LRose@senecacountyparks.com at least 24 hours in advance.
*Ritz Theatre Bingo, Doors open 5 p.m., Somerset Reception Center, Huron St., Tiffin. Early bird games 6:30 p.m., regular bingo 7 p.m. All proceeds benefit The Ritz Theatre.
*Storytime, 6 p.m., Mohawk Community Library, 200 S. Sycamore Ave. Sycamore.
*Advent Prayer: Make Ready the Way by Zoom, 7-7:45 p.m., offered by St. Francis Spirituality Center. To register, call Jennifer (419) 443-1485 or go to peace@franciscanretreats.org.

Tuesday
*Cardio Drumming 50+, 8-8:45 a.m., Allen Eiry Center, 28 Hopewell Ave. Open to anyone 50 years of age and older that is a member of the AEC.
*Public Health Nursing Services Clinic (vaccinations, lice checks, etc), 8-9 a.m., Seneca County General Health District, 71 S. Washington St., Suite 1102. Appointments only. Schedule by calling (419) 447-3691, ext 6333.
*Preschool Storytime, 10-11 a.m., Tiffin-Seneca Public Library, 77 Jefferson St. Frost Kalnow Room. Ages 3-5.
*Teen Tuesday, 3-4:30 p.m., Tiffin-Seneca Public Library, 77 Jefferson St. Teens in grades 6-12 are invited to a weekly after-school hangout for games, snacks, crafts, and more.
*Ribbon Cutting: Forte Music, 4 p.m. See the renovations to their new space at 122 Ashwood Dr.
*14th Annual Santa at the Depot, 5-7 p.m., LE&W Depot, 128 W. North St., Fostoria.
*Al-anon meeting, 7 p.m., First Christian Church, 2016 S. CR 19. Masks at your discretion. Feel free to bring water or soft drink. No smoking.

Wednesday
*Public Health Nursing Services Clinic (vaccinations, lice checks, etc), 8-9 a.m., Seneca County General Health District, 71 S. Washington St., Suite 1102. Appointments only. Schedule by calling (419) 447-3691, ext 6333.
*Pfizer Booster Dose Clinic, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Seneca County General Health District, 71 S. Washington St., Suite 1102. Appointments only. To schedule, go to https://gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov or call (419) 447-3691, ext 6333.
*Flu Shot Clinic, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Seneca County General Health District, 71 S. Washington St., Suite 1102. Ages 12 and older. Youth must be accompanied by parent/guardian. Appointments only. To schedule, call (419) 447-3691, ext 6333.
*First and Second Dose COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Seneca County General Health District, 71 S Washington St., Suite 1102. Ages 12 and older. Youth must be accompanied by parent/guardian. Pfizer and Moderna vaccines available. Schedule appointment at https://gettheshot.coronavirus.ohio.gov or call (419) 447-3691, ext 6333. Walk-ins also welcome.
*Yoga Class, 6-7 p.m., St. Francis Spirituality Center, Greecio Room, 200 St. Francis Ave. Limit: 10 participants. Beginners are also welcome! Suggested donation $7/session. Call Sr. Paulette at (567) 230-0220 to register.
*Conversations about Coping through COVID-19 using Zoom, 7-8 p.m., St. Francis Spirituality Center, 200 St. Francis Ave. For info (419) 443-1485.

Thursday
*Cardio Drumming 50+, 8-8:45 a.m., Allen Eiry Center, 28 Hopewell Ave. Open to anyone 50 years of age and older that is a member of the AEC.
*Childhood Vaccination Clinic, 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m., evening hours also offered each month, Seneca County General Health District, 71 S. Washington St., Suite 1102. Ages birth to 18. Children must be accompanied by parent/guardian. Appointments only. Schedule by calling (419) 447-3691, ext 6333.
*Ecumenical Sharing Kitchen, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., St. Paul's United Methodist Church, 46 Madison St. All are welcome. For more info, call (419) 447-1743.
*Ritz Theatre Bingo, Doors open 5 p.m., Somerset Reception Center, Huron St., Tiffin. Early bird games 6:30 p.m., regular bingo 7 p.m. All proceeds benefit The Ritz Theatre.
*Storytime, 6 p.m., Mohawk Community Library, 200 S. Sycamore Ave. Sycamore.
*Conversations About Faith, 7-8:30 p.m., St. Francis Spirituality Center, 200 St. Francis Ave. For info or registration (419) 443-1485 or peace@franciscanretreats.org.

Friday
*Public Health Nursing Services Clinic (vaccinations, lice checks, etc), 8-9 a.m., Seneca County General Health District, 71 S. Washington St., Suite 1102. Appointments only. Schedule by calling (419) 447-3691, ext 6333.

Saturday
*Cookie Walk, 9 a.m.-noon, Greenspring United Methodist Church, 117 N. Broadway, Greensprings. Our bakers will have a variety of cookies and candies available for $7 per pound. Money raised will be given to mission and local charities. For everyone's safety, please wear your mask.
*Oasis Day Mini Retreat “Our Pathway to Life” in person and by Zoom, 9 a.m.-noon, St. Francis Spirituality Center. To register, call Jennifer at (419) 443-1485 or email peace@franciscanretreats.org.
*Christmas Open House at SpiritSpace Gallery & Gifts, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Spirituality Center, 200 St. Francis Ave. Refreshments and door prizes.

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Tiffin Advertiser Tribune
Published 16 hours ago

Honor roll student wins Vax-2-School scholarship

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Tiffin Advertiser Tribune
Published 16 hours ago

Josh Duggar trial: Federal investigator details what was found on computer

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (KNWA/KFTA) — On Friday afternoon at the Western District of Arkansas courthouse in Fayetteville, the prosecution and defense teams each concluded their questioning of a U.S. Department of Justice computer forensics expert.

At 5 p.m., Judge Timothy L. Brooks gave the jury the option of leaving for the weekend, or continuing on in order to finish the testimony of High Technology Investigative Unit (HTIU) Director James Fottrell. The jury opted to let him conclude his time on the stand.

Duggar’s lead defense attorney, Justin Gelfand, continued his cross-examination of the witness when the jury returned from lunch shortly after 1:30 p.m.

Legal experts discuss charges brought against parents of alleged Michigan school shooter

He brought up varied points, noting that a USB flash drive that was plugged into an HP computer was never seized or found by agents during the search warrant executed at Duggar’s car lot in November, 2019. Forensic evidence shows that a USB flash drive containing two Word documents and a Powerpoint file was inserted into the HP at some point. Later, on redirect with prosecuting attorney William Clayman, the subject circled back to that missing item.

Josh Duggar’s defense attorney Justin Gelfand in federal court giving opening statements in the Josh Duggar federal child porn trial. | Artist: John Kushmaul

Sketch of Josh Duggar in federal court for his child porn trial | Artist: John Kushmaul

Sketch of a witness giving testimony in the Josh Duggar federal child porn trial. | Artist: John Kushmaul

Defense attorneys for Duggar have argued that someone else downloaded or placed the child pornography onto the 33-year-old’s work computer, noting that no child pornography was found on Duggar’s phone or laptop.

But federal prosecutors have detailed logs showing, minute by minute, the activity on Duggar’s computer that alternated between him sending personal messages, downloading child porn and saving pictures of notes.

On Thursday, Fottrell testified that a Linux open-source operating system and a browser capable of encryption were installed behind a partition on the used-car dealership’s desktop computer.

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The partition essentially split the computer’s hard drive into a public-facing side that was business-related and included the tracking program, and a secret second side that used Linux and the browser, experts said.

This allowed anyone using the computer to evade an accountability program installed to report to Duggar’s wife about inappropriate internet activity, such as searching for pornography.

Fottrell testified that sexually explicit photos and videos of children were found on the Linux side of the computer, the Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported.

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On Friday, Fottrell provided details obtained from a backup of Duggar’s iPhone, made on a MacBook Pro laptop, that placed the phone at the car lot on the exact dates and times that the illegal material was downloaded, accessed and shared on the dealership’s desktop computer, KNWA-TV in Fayetteville reported.

A Homeland Security senior crime forensic analyst, James Follett, testified Friday that a car receipt naming “Josh” as the sales agent was found behind the partition where the child pornography was downloaded, the Democrat-Gazette reported. And the password to access the hidden section was a variation on passwords Duggar had used on other devices for at least five years.

Duggar, featured on TLC’s “19 Kids and Counting” show, was charged in April. Prosecutors say child pornography was downloaded to the computer in May 2019.

Jurors, alternates selected in Josh Duggar’s child pornography trial, Jim Bob Duggar won’t testify

TLC pulled the reality TV show in 2015 over revelations that Duggar had molested four of his sisters and a babysitter. Duggar’s parents said he confessed to the fondling and apologized. U.S. District Judge Timothy Brooks ruled earlier this week that jurors may hear details of that abuse in the child pornography trial.

In 2015, Duggar publicly apologized for his pornography addiction and cheating on his wife, calling himself “the biggest hypocrite ever.”

Duggar’s trial begins as his father, Jim Bob Duggar, runs in a special election for a vacant state Senate seat in northwest Arkansas. Jim Bob Duggar was also featured prominently on the TLC show and previously served in the Arkansas House. The primary election for the open seat is on Dec. 14.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

WDTN NBC Channel 2
Published 16 hours ago

Grand Prize Vax-2-School winners announced

COLUMBUS (WCMH) — The final set of 30 winners in Ohio’s Vax-2-School scholarship drawing were announced Friday afternoon, with the grand prize winners announced at 7:30 p.m..

Today’s grand prize winners, who have each received $100,000 scholarships, are listed in alphabetical order below:

Audrey Bird, Brecksville

Rinoa Chech, Canton

Avery Lagory, Cleves

Widnelson Miller, Delphos

Jacob Peters, Conover

$10,000 scholarship winners were announced on Twitter and Instagram at @ohiovax2school on Friday afternoon.

Those winners are:

Daniel Adams, Holland

Mariel Augsburger, Wapakoneta

Eliesna Bangura, Columbus

Clayton Bernath, North Olmsted

Ryan Brunner, Cincinnati

Chloe Chadwick, Hudson

Renata Chavez Garcia, Mason

Charlotte Dickinson, Vermilion

Carson Dues, Dublin

Evelyn Dukes, Austintown

Alana Dustin, Westerville

Brionna Edwards, Columbus

Sky Evans, Cleveland

Gabriel Foreman, Bellefontaine

Cole Franke, Euclid

Katelynn Frazier, Brook Park

Evan Groh, North Royalton

Benjamin Gurd, Chagrin Falls

Caden Krupinski, Beavercreek

Isabella Messenger, Wooster

Chloe Murphy, Chardon

Amelia Nehlsen, Brecksville

Nidhi Patel, Hilliard

Andrew Putt, Massillon

Jonathan Rosa, Parma

Margaret Selegue, Glenford

Connor Self, Chagrin Falls

Carly Stewart, Solon

Charles Sutton, Wapakoneta

Andre Tabler, Mansfield

Residents ages 5-25 who have at least started the COVID-19 vaccine are eligible to win one of five $100,000 or one of 150 $10,000 scholarships to any Ohio college, university, technical or trade school, or career program of their choice.

COVID-19 in Ohio schools: Cases drop around Thanksgiving

The five grand prize winners will be announced during the lottery broadcast at 7:29 p.m. Friday.

The first batch of winners were announced Monday, with an additional 30 named Tuesday, an additional 30 on Wednesday, and an additional 30 on Thursday.

Those winners are:

WDTN NBC Channel 2
Published 16 hours ago

A discomfort with Western liberalism is growing in Eastern Europe

Published December 4, 2021 at 7:00 AM EST

Laszlo Magas, left, and Laszlo Nagy. Both men were anti-communists during the Soviet period and sought an opening to the West. They are pictured near the Hungary-Austria border, which young protesters opened in 1989.

BUDAPEST, Hungary — When President Biden greets scores of nations at his virtual "Summit for Democracy" this coming week, one member of the Western alliance won't be there.

Hungary, on the Eastern edge of the European Union, was not invited.

Washington and EU leaders in Brussels have repeatedly accused the country's ultranationalist government, led by Prime Minister Viktor Orban, of undermining democracy. Biden once name-checked Hungary when referring to the "thugs of the world."

But Laszlo Magas, a retired professor who helped bring an end to communism in Hungary, chalks up his country's political isolation to one thing: Western liberal bias.

"Hungary is not the West's colony," says Magas, an Orban supporter who echoes many of the prime minister's views. "The whole world is being misled about us. The mainstream media is full of fake news about us. The liberals want you to think Hungary doesn't know what democracy is because we don't share their beliefs."

Europe, he says, is ideologically divided between the conservative East and the more liberal West, something like red-and-blue America.

"And the border is the [former] Iron Curtain," Magas says. "We in the East are the ones protecting traditional European values, Christian values, while the West has gone crazy."

Many in Eastern Europe have concluded that Western liberalism is not a good fit

Orban and his Fidesz party have become the flag-bearers of this mindset during their decade in power. The Hungarian government has repeatedly clashed with Brussels over migration, multiculturalism, press freedom and, most recently, LGBTQ rights.

Their target in this culture war has been liberal democracy, which Orban has tried to equate with leftist and "unpatriotic" beliefs. Orban is instead promoting "illiberal democracy", a term coined by journalist Fareed Zakaria to describe countries where elected leaders undermine checks on power.

Orban first used the term in a 2014 speech promoting governance in the national interest, citing China, Russia and Turkey as examples. Four years later, after his party won in a landslide election, he declared that "we have replaced a shipwrecked liberal democracy with a 21st-century Christian democracy" that supports tradition and security.

"He's trying to position himself to play the role that [Cuban leader] Fidel Castro played for the left in the 1970s," says political scientist Ivan Krastev, who with Stephen Holmes co-wrote The Light That Failed: Why the West Is Losing the Fight for Democracy, an examination of Eastern Europe's disillusionment with liberal democracy.

"The leftists fell in love with Castro for standing up for things they believed in, for being a revolutionary. Orban and Hungary are playing the same role now, but for conservatives," Krastev says.

Hungary has become a magnet for European far-right nationalists and American conservatives. Fox News host Tucker Carlson took his show to Hungary for a week this August, treating Orban to a glowing interview.

Former Vice President Mike Pence followed in September, where he said he hoped the US would overturn abortion rights. Pence also praised the Hungarian government's promotion of "traditional family values" at the Budapest Demographics Summit, an annual paean to increasing population through more childbirth instead of immigration.

And next year, the American Conservative Union is planning to hold a version of its Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Budapest.

The two groups — nationalists from behind the former Iron Curtain, and U.S. conservatives aligned with former President Donald Trump — exploit the same fear, Krastev says, "and this is the fear that there are not enough of us, that we're living in the world in which we are going to be replaced, in which our numbers are shrinking and in which we are going to lose our identity."

The end of communism meant political and cultural choices for the people of Eastern Europe

Laszlo Magas did not have those fears when he and other democracy activists pushed in 1989 to bring down the communist system and its strict limits on freedom of speech, assembly, religion and movement.

Magas, then a forestry engineering professor in the city of Sopron, helped organize a protest known as the Pan-European Picnic in a field near the border with Austria.

After thousands of young Hungarians and East Germans gathered there, Hungary's government opened the border, months before the fall of the Berlin Wall. It was the first breach of the Iron Curtain.

"We thought we could be free as part of a unified Europe if only we could open that border," Magas says.

But the initial elation of freedom gave way to culture shock, as Eastern European economies struggled, and millions migrated west.

Laszlo Nagy, another organizer of the picnic protest, says communism put Soviet bloc societies into "the deep freezer" after World War II. "And when we emerged from this deep freezer in 1990, we went right into the microwave," he says. "The changes came too fast."

Krastev, who grew up in Bulgaria, another Iron Curtain country, says an existential crisis brewed in Eastern Europe.

"We wanted to be like the West but the very moment you want to be like somebody else, it means that probably this somebody else is better than you," he says. "And then you start to have the fear of what about our own identity? What is going to happen?"

These questions have lingered in Hungary, a country of 10 million that has long seen itself as a small nation fighting to survive a long list of occupiers, including the Soviet-backed communists.

"During communism, Hungarian people were basically told by the Soviets how to live," says Natalia Borza, a philosopher and linguist in Budapest. "And OK, 30 years passed but still we have the memory of what it feels like being under someone else's rules."

Orban the anti-communist is following his own path of illiberalism

Orban has maintained his defiant message since he was a communist-fighting law student in the 1980s. In 2015, when more than a million asylum-seekers arrived in Europe, he presented them as invaders seeking to erase European demographics and culture. He rejected EU mandates to take in relocated refugees and conform to Brussels' standards for rule of law.

More recently, at the demographics summit, Orban accused the "Western left wing" of trying to "relativize the notion of family."

"Its tools for doing so are gender ideology and the LGBTQ lobby, which are attacking our children," he said.

Orban's government recently passed a controversial law restricting the teaching of LGBTQ issues in schools. It was prompted by the publication in 2020 of Wonderland Is For Everyone, a children's storybook featuring gay, nonbinary and transgender characters.

Boldizsar Nagy, who edited the storybook, says he received death threats as the government attacked it.

"It became a tool for them, and they used it as the symbol of the 'Western enemy,' of Western decay," he says.

/ Joanna Kakissis for NPR

Boldizsar Nagy is the editor of <em>Wonderland Is for Everyone,</em> a children's storybook featuring gay, nonbinary and transgender characters. The book's publication has led to an outcry on the right in Hungary.

The new law means books with LGBTQ themes are wrapped in plastic and forbidden to be sold within 650 feet of schools or churches. It also forbids high schools to invite educators like Eszter Ari, an evolutionary biologist and LGBTQ advocate, to speak about tolerance.

Ari says the government wants Hungary's LGBTQ citizens "to be quiet about who they are, or leave the country."

"The government has made us, their own citizens, the enemy," she says. "They want to divide the people so they are afraid and don't think about things like government corruption."

The law has angered Western European leaders like Mark Rutte, prime minister of the Netherlands, which, in 2001, became the first country in the world to approve same-sex marriage. Hungary "has no business being in the EU anymore," Rutte said this summer.

The European Union is threatening to cut funding to Hungary, which concerns even Hungarians who support Orban's stand in the culture wars.

/ Joanna Kakissis for NPR

Eszter Ari is an educator, evolutionary biologist and LGBTQ activist who advocates tolerance.

The divisions in Hungarian society are growing, along with efforts to lessen them

Seventeen-year-old Annamaria Veszten considers herself a conservative and says she appreciates Orban fighting for traditional values. But she's lived her whole life in a Hungary that's part of the European Union. "It's very good for our economy to be part of it," she says.

I met Veszten this summer in Esztergom, a city north of Budapest, that hosted a conference organized by Mathias Corvinus Collegium, a private educational institution that recently received more than $1.7 billion from Orban's government. The conference headlined talks by American conservatives including Carlson, writer Rod Dreher and talk radio host Dennis Prager.

Veszten came away troubled that some attendees ridiculed and booed speakers with liberal views.

"It is not just Europe divided but also this country," she said. "I don't feel like we are part of one nation. It's more like two nations already.

Congregants at the Hungarian Evangelical Fellowship, a modest Methodist church on the outskirts of Budapest, feel the same way.

On a recent Sunday morning, a woman offers a prayer for Western-funded nonprofits that the government has labeled foreign agents. Another offers thanks for the church's tall, white-bearded pastor, Gabor Ivanyi.

"I know what it feels like to be cast out," Ivanyi says. "So I decided to become the kind of pastor who shows solidarity with those who are marginalized."

Like Orban and Magas, who helped organize the 1989 protest to bring down the Iron Curtain, the clergyman fought the communist system. Hungary's Soviet-backed government evicted him from his church and boarded it up. For years, he was forced to preach on the streets.

/ Joanna Kakissis for NPR

Pastor Gabor Ivanyi of the Hungarian Evangelical Fellowship, a modest Methodist church on the outskirts of Budapest. Ivanyi worries about a growing left-right divide in Hungarian society.

Ivanyi met Orban while fighting communism, and at first they were allies. He baptized two of Orban's children and renewed the prime minister's wedding vows. But the pastor says he is angry that Orban uses Christianity to vilify migrants and political critics.

"The protection of Christian values should not be handled by politicians," Ivanyi says, "because politicizing Christianity has steered European civilization to its utter demise twice."

There are signs that culture wars have limits. Orban is wooing two Eastern powers — China and Russia — that both Hungarians and conservative culture warriors associate with communist suppression.

"Orban sees relations with these countries as pragmatic, especially financially, and also as strategy in his fight with Brussels," says Andras Kosa, an Orban biographer. "But Hungarians do not trust Moscow and Beijing and do not want to get too close to them."

Hungarians go to the polls next spring, and Orban will face a newly united opposition. Its candidate is Peter Marki-Zay, a Christian conservative who is the mayor of Hodmezovasarhely, a small city in rural Hungary.

Marki-Zay is running on an anti-corruption platform and promises to defend Hungary's identity, but not at the expense of democratic institutions. He also says he will repair relations with the EU and Washington.

"I still stand for Western values," Marki-Zay told the AP last month. "We cannot accept a corrupt thug ... who betrays Western values and who is now a servant of Communist China and Russia."

He also took a page out of Trump's playbook and suggested that Brussels and Washington are planning to meddle in the upcoming election.

"Even the entirety of the Left won't be able to stop us," he says.

Mate Halmos contributed reporting from Hungary

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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WKSU 89.7
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