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Parents of accused killer in Michigan school shooting arrested after vehicle was found in Detroit

DETROIT — James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teen charged in the Oxford High School shooting were located and arrested early Saturday in Detroit, a little more than two hours after a citizen saw their vehicle and called police.

"Yes, they are both in custody and will be on the way to the Oakland County Jail soon," said Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe. "Kudos to Detroit PD and all the other agencies that assisted."

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since about noon Friday after they were charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting deaths at the high school in Michigan. Their son, Ethan Crumbley, 15, is accused of fatally shooting four students and injuring seven others at the suburban Detroit high school on Tuesday.

The Crumbley parents did not show for their arraignment Friday afternoon in Rochester Hills, Michigan. The U.S. Marshals Service issued "Wanted" posters and offered a reward for information leading to their arrests.

The investigation of the shootings and the search for the Crumbleys was led by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. McCabe said the vehicle was found around 11:30 p.m. Friday.

"The owner of the building arrived and saw the car in the back parking lot, knew it didn’t belong there, went to investigate," McCabe told the Detroit Free Press, part of the USA TODAY Network.

The building's owner immediately recognized the car from information put out by law enforcement, checked the license plate, which matched, and called 911.

By about 1:45 a.m., the Crumbleys were under arrest.

Jennifer and James Crumbley were each charged with involuntary manslaughter after Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald said they bought the firearm for their son as a Christmas gift.

During a hearing that started around noon, a lieutenant with the Oakland County Sheriff's Office said the parents were not in custody. The Oakland County Fugitive Team, along with several agencies, were searching for the couple as of Friday evening.

"The action of fleeing and ignoring their attorney certainly adds weight to the charges," Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a release Friday. "They cannot run from their part in this tragedy."

But the family's lawyers said the couple was not fleeing from authorities and were returning to the area after having left town briefly amid the commotion surrounding tragedy.

"The Crumbleys left town on the night of the tragic shooting for their own safety. They are returning to the area to be arraigned," their lawyers Smith and Mariell Lehman said.

The gun had been stored in an unlocked drawer in their house, and Crumbley's parents did not ask where it was when they were called to the school the day of the shooting for a disturbing drawing their son made of a firearm, McDonald said at a news conference Friday.

Ethan Crumbley had posted about the firearm online and researched ammunition while at school, McDonald said the investigation revealed. He was also allowed to return to class on the day of the shooting after the meeting with his parents, she said.

"The facts of this case are so egregious," McDonald said.

Charges for parents of shooter rare, experts say:Michigan school shooting is 'so egregious,' the suspect's parents are charged.

Michigan school shooting suspect faces life in prison: What murder, terrorism charges mean

Crumbley was charged Wednesday as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes in what investigators described as a methodical and deliberate massacre.

When asked whether her office was looking into charges for any school officials, McDonald said the investigation was ongoing.

"While the shooter was the one who entered the high school and pulled the trigger, there are other individuals who contributed to the events on Nov. 30, and it's my intention to hold them accountable as well," she said.

Here's what we know Friday:

Prosecutor: Gun was 'Christmas present'

At a news conference Friday, McDonald laid out how Ethan Crumbley got the weapon other warning signs in the days leading up to the shooting.

McDonald said Ethan Crumbley was there when his father bought the 9mm Sig Sauer SP 2022 on Nov. 26. The same day, the younger Crumbley posted photos of the weapon online, calling it his "new beauty." His mom said in a post the following day, "Mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," McDonald said.

"Clearly based on the statements of the shooter (and) the statements of mom, that was his gun," McDonald said.

Prosecutor: School officials knew shooting suspect searched online for ammo, made drawings

Suspect's drawing prompted worries on day of shooting

The 15-year-old suspect was also caught looking up ammunition online while at school before the shooting. McDonald said school officials contacted his mother about the online search, leaving a voicemail and email, but received no response. Crumbley's mother instead texted him the same day, "LOL I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," McDonald said.

Hours before the shooting, Crumbley was found with a disturbing drawing that included a a firearm and someone who appeared to be bleeding, McDonald said.

A teacher took a photo of the drawing, and Crumbley's parents were immediately contacted. When the drawing was brought to a school counselor with Crumbley and his parents present, Crumbley had altered it, McDonald said.

A counselor told the parents their son needed to get counseling, but Crumbley was able to return to class. His parents did not ask him about the firearm at that time nor did they search his backpack, McDonald said.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom," McDonald added.

After reports of the shooting at the school, Jennifer Crumbley texted her son, "Ethan don't do it," McDonald said. James Crumbley drove home to search for the firearm and called 911 to report it missing, saying he believed his son was the shooter, McDonald said.

"I'm angry as a mother. I'm angry as the prosecutor. I'm angry as a person that lives in this county. I'm angry. There were a lot of things that could have been so simple to prevent," McDonald said.

Slew of copycat threats across metro Detroit trouble schools, parents

Copycat threats circulated on social media and districts canceled classes Thursday out of caution for students' safety.

A 17-year-old student in Southfield, about 30 miles from Oxford High School, was arrested Thursday with a semi-automatic pistol. A bomb threat was also made at South Lake High School, about 45 miles from Oxford, and prompted a police investigation.

“If you’re making threats, we’re going to find you,” Bouchard said during a news conference Thursday that was specifically called to address the estimated hundreds of copycat threats reported. “It is ridiculous you’re inflaming the fears and passion of parents, teachers, and the community in the midst of a real tragedy.”

The FBI and Secret Service are also investigating threats.

People who make false threats could face charges for false threat of terrorism, which is a 20-year felony, and misdemeanor malicious use of a telephone, McDonald said.

Meanwhile, parents are walking a fine line of ensuring their children's security without affecting their kids' mental and emotional health.

"I felt like I was going to throw up," said Jill Dillon, 51, recalling dropping off her 14-year-old son to school Wednesday morning. "It was nauseating, thinking that I'm supposed to be taking him someplace safe, and is he really going to be safe?"

David Roden, a 14-year-old freshman at Northville High School, which stayed open Thursday, said the confusion of what's real and what's not was the scariest part.

"Everyone was on edge. It's just kind of weird, being close to the situation," he said.

— Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press

Fake Instagram accounts multiply

Fake social media accounts claiming to be the 15-year-old charged in the Oxford High School shooting began popping up even before his name was released by law enforcement, and some made threats about additional shootings and plans for revenge.

While direct threats may lead to criminal charges, the spread of false information via deceiving accounts is a common problem in the wake of mass shootings, often is not illegal and sometimes does not violate social media platforms’ terms of service.

“Unfortunately, poor taste is not against the law,” said Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police.

It is unlikely any social media accounts that chronicled Crumbley’s alleged criminal activity remain active on these platforms, said Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan's School of Information.

In active threat situations, the social media accounts of alleged perpetrators are taken down through an opaque process, Lampe said. Platforms are alerted either by their own algorithms or by law enforcement.

The tendency of social media platforms to make some user accounts “disappear in the night” can help feed the creation of these fake accounts, Lampe said. However, the common practice of setting up “sock puppets” online would happen regardless, he said.

— Ashley Nerbovig, Detroit Free Press

Contributing: Darcie Moran, Tyler J. Davis, Phoebe Wall Howard, Elisha Anderson, Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press; The Associated Press

bucyrustelegraphforum.com
Published 14 hours ago

Contact tracing revs up in some states as omicron reaches US

Dec 04, 2021 8:30 AM

The arrival of the omicron variant of the coronavirus in the U.S. has health officials in some communities reviving contact tracing operations in an attempt to slow and better understand its spread as scientists study how contagious it is and whether it can thwart vaccines.

In New York City, officials quickly reached out to a man who tested positive for the variant and had attended an anime conference at a Manhattan convention center last month along with more than 50,000 people. Five other attendees have also been infected with the coronavirus, though officials don't yet know whether it was with the omicron variant.

“As for what we learned about this conference at the Javits Center and these additional cases, our test and trace team is out there immediately working with each individual who was affected to figure out who else they came in contact with. That contact tracing is absolutely crucial,” New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said.

Once a global epicenter of the pandemic, New York has the country’s biggest contract tracing effort. The city identified four omicron cases Thursday, and a fifth was discovered in nearby Suffolk County on eastern Long Island.

The variant has been detected in a handful of other states so far, including California, Colorado and Hawaii.

Contract tracers have been busy in Nebraska after six cases of omicron were confirmed Friday. One of the people had recently returned from a visit to Nigeria, and the other five were close contacts of that person.

In Philadelphia, officials were working to track down contacts of a man in his 30s who is Pennsylvania’s first resident infected with the variant, the city’s Department of Public Health said.

And in Maryland, officials were rushing to trace, quarantine and test close contacts of three people from the Baltimore area who are the first known cases in the state. Two are from the same household, including a vaccinated person who recently traveled to South Africa, and the third has no recent travel history and is unrelated to the other two.

Dr. Marcus Plescia, chief medical officer of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, said “more and more” contact tracing efforts are expected in the coming days, in part because of the uncertainty about how effective vaccines and treatments like monoclonal antibodies will be against omicron.

Contact tracing is a vital tool in the pandemic response, allowing health departments to notify people who had close contact with an infected person and slow the progression of COVID-19.

“Contact tracing can give us information about how it’s spreading and hopefully break chains of transmission to stop clusters and outbreaks, or at least delay them until we know more and understand what our next steps need to be,” said Crystal Watson, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security at the Bloomberg School of Public Health.

While much is still unknown about the variant, early reports are raising alarms. New COVID-19 cases in South Africa, which first alerted the world to omicron last week, have burgeoned from about 200 a day in mid-November to more than 16,000 on Friday.

Some of the U.S. cases involve people who hadn’t traveled recently, meaning the variant was likely already circulating domestically in some parts of the country.

In New York, the three-day anime festival in November is presenting a staffing challenge for tracers due to the large number of attendees. The one known omicron infection involved a man from Minnesota.

Officials cautioned against linking the other five coronavirus cases directly to the event.

“The really important point here is that’s five cases from a denominator of tens of thousands of people at this conference. And furthermore, we’ve not established any sort of link between those five cases and widespread transmission at the conference,” said Ted Long, executive director of the NYC Test & Trace Corps, which runs the city’s contact tracing program.

Proof of vaccination was necessary for admission, as mandated by city law, and masks were also required.

Officials say they have contact information for about 36,500 of the event's attendees, vendors and exhibitors, with much of the information provided by convention organizers. With just 2,000 contact tracers employed by the city, the tracing will take time.

“We’re endeavoring to reach them all, but contact tracing this many thousands of people cannot be done instantaneously,” said Adam Shrier, a spokesman for the contact tracing program.

In Minnesota, meanwhile, officials are investigating “a circle of contacts” for the man believed to have been infected at the conference, said Kris Ehresmann, the state’s infectious disease director.

“Part of the reason we did indicate where he had been — the anime convention in New York — is because there were so many people that attended that event. It would not be possible for him or really anyone to identify everyone that they were potentially in contact with,” Ehresmann said.

Asked about the difficulty of contact tracing in this case, Minnesota Health Commissioner Jan Malcolm said that “it goes to the challenge of the incredible kind of epidemiologic detective work that goes on with these things.”

Amid the surge of the delta variant, health investigators across the U.S. became overwhelmed and scaled back contact tracing operations, finding it nearly impossible to keep up with the deluge of new infections, administer vaccines and also do tracing at the same time.

Many health officials ultimately focused on exposures at schools or potential super-spreader incidents where large numbers of people were at risk of exposure.

Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of infectious diseases at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, expects that will ultimately happen with omicron.

“Contact tracing and sequencing will allow us to paint with a broad brush," Schaffner said. “But we won’t be able to track it down to each and every case, and at a given point, when you know it is here and spreading, why do we need to do that?"

Findlay Courier
Published 14 hours ago

DEAR ANNIE: Thank you for all of your ...

Dec 04, 2021 8:30 AM

... responses to "Letting Go Is Hard to Do." We have undeniably wonderful parents among our readership. Here are two of my favorite letters.

Dear Annie:

This is in response to "Letting Go Is Hard to Do," who was worried about the choices her daughter might be making at college after seeing a questionable bank transaction.

I am also the mom of a college-age student. We have had a joint account ever since my son was a senior in high school.

I made a promise to myself to not allow our joint checking accounts to be a way to peek into his world. Trust me, it is very hard not to look — especially when I am transferring money to his account. If his spending info pops up, I look away and put my hand over so I cannot see.

It is a don't-see-don't-tell trust that I never told him I had in place. He is very independent, and if I'd have questioned things, he would have started to mistrust me. There is always a way teens get around roadblocks; it's called taking cash out of the account and spending it that way or buying a Visa gift card with the cash.

It gets easier as they get older to not look. I encourage you to think about why you need to look at how she spends her money. My son was no angel for a good four to five years. But he trusts me now, and when the really hard/big things come up, he comes to me for comfort and direction, and to ease his fears. Let a little more of the string go, and when your bird flies, you will be rewarded with trust and honesty.

- Money and Trust

Dear Annie:

I want to be as polite as I can in this reply to the mom who's concerned about her 18-year-old daughter essentially just being an 18-year-old away at college.

With all due respect, Letting Go — because you sound like a great mom and you seem to have a good bond with your daughter — maybe drop the "God's gift" talk, stop thinking about what your religion teaches about birth control and just ask your kid if she's OK and let her know you're there to talk.

She may not be as interested as you are in what God and your religious community's leadership thinks about her sex life. Meanwhile, here on Earth, you're both humans who love each other. Lead with that.

In terms of sex addiction and so-called addictive behaviors, aka symptoms of a disease called addiction, which aren't "behaviors" in an addict but rather compulsions, again, be honest. Talk about it head-on. Don't minimize it if you're truly worried.

And if you're not, let her live her life and keep your opinions to yourself. You can either have a relationship that is close, honest and real or have some mix of hope, denial and religious idealism. But the half-measure of trying to have both almost guarantees the first will be lost, which would be a shame.

Keep your life between you and God, her life between you and her, and trust God to know how to handle the rest. God is too busy caring for billions of souls to really care much about birth control and sex toys. Take God's lead.

- Dad of a Teen, Too

Send your questions for Annie Lane to dearannie@creators.com

Findlay Courier
Published 14 hours ago

Manhunt ends: Parents of accused Oxford school shooter arrested in Detroit

DETROIT, MI — Hours after a $10,000 manhunt was launched by the U.S. Marshals, the parents of the accused Oxford High School shooting suspect were taken in custody, officials said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were arrested in Detroit by officers in the Detroit Police Department in the early morning hours of Saturday, Dec. 4, said Mike McCabe, undersheriff with the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office.

Their son, 15-year-old Ethan Crumbley, is accused of killing four students and wounding seven other people.

The police department received a 911 call from a business owner who observed the married couple’s vehicle — a black 2021 Kia Seltos SUV — in his parking lot on Bellevue near Jefferson in Detroit early Saturday morning, McCabe said.

A woman was observed near the vehicle, McCabe said. When the business owner called 911, she fled on foot. An “extensive search” by Detroit police and K-9 units led to both of the fugitives. The two will be transported to the Oakland County Jail this morning, McCabe said.

McCabe said he expected the couple will be arraigned after 9 a.m. Saturday in the 52nd District Court, Division 3, in Rochester Hills via video.

The sheriff’s office on Friday, Dec. 3, said they were searching for the accused killer’s parents. They were supposed to turn themselves into authorities with the help of their attorney but did not.

Sheriff’s administrators said the attorney on Friday morning said she would make arrangements for their arrest should warrants be issued against them. About noon Friday, Oakland County prosecutors issued warrants for four counts of involuntary manslaughter.

The attorney later Friday told police she had made repeated attempts to reach the couple, but was unable to do so.

Late Friday, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 for information leading to the arrest of the Crumbleys. Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald described evidence that led to the charges against the parents at a Friday news conference.

Images of Jennifer and James Crumbley released by the Oalkand County Sheriff's Deparrment on Friday, Dec. 3

RELATED:

‘Ethan don’t do it,’ Mom texted son when she heard news of Oxford school shooting, prosecutor says

Parents of alleged gunman charged with involuntary manslaughter in Oxford school shooting

A close-knit, family community: Oxford locals want the world to see more than shooting

Stricter gun laws? The question looms over Michigan politics in wake of deadly school shooting

Cleveland Plain Dealer
Published 14 hours ago

Parents of accused killer in Michigan school shooting arrested after vehicle was found in Detroit

DETROIT — James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teen charged in the Oxford High School shooting were located and arrested early Saturday in Detroit, a little more than two hours after a citizen saw their vehicle and called police.

"Yes, they are both in custody and will be on the way to the Oakland County Jail soon," said Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe. "Kudos to Detroit PD and all the other agencies that assisted."

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since about noon Friday after they were charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting deaths at the high school in Michigan. Their son, Ethan Crumbley, 15, is accused of fatally shooting four students and injuring seven others at the suburban Detroit high school on Tuesday.

The Crumbley parents did not show for their arraignment Friday afternoon in Rochester Hills, Michigan. The U.S. Marshals Service issued "Wanted" posters and offered a reward for information leading to their arrests.

The investigation of the shootings and the search for the Crumbleys was led by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. McCabe said the vehicle was found around 11:30 p.m. Friday.

"The owner of the building arrived and saw the car in the back parking lot, knew it didn’t belong there, went to investigate," McCabe told the Detroit Free Press, part of the USA TODAY Network.

The building's owner immediately recognized the car from information put out by law enforcement, checked the license plate, which matched, and called 911.

By about 1:45 a.m., the Crumbleys were under arrest.

Jennifer and James Crumbley were each charged with involuntary manslaughter after Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald said they bought the firearm for their son as a Christmas gift.

During a hearing that started around noon, a lieutenant with the Oakland County Sheriff's Office said the parents were not in custody. The Oakland County Fugitive Team, along with several agencies, were searching for the couple as of Friday evening.

"The action of fleeing and ignoring their attorney certainly adds weight to the charges," Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a release Friday. "They cannot run from their part in this tragedy."

But the family's lawyers said the couple was not fleeing from authorities and were returning to the area after having left town briefly amid the commotion surrounding tragedy.

"The Crumbleys left town on the night of the tragic shooting for their own safety. They are returning to the area to be arraigned," their lawyers Smith and Mariell Lehman said.

The gun had been stored in an unlocked drawer in their house, and Crumbley's parents did not ask where it was when they were called to the school the day of the shooting for a disturbing drawing their son made of a firearm, McDonald said at a news conference Friday.

Ethan Crumbley had posted about the firearm online and researched ammunition while at school, McDonald said the investigation revealed. He was also allowed to return to class on the day of the shooting after the meeting with his parents, she said.

"The facts of this case are so egregious," McDonald said.

Charges for parents of shooter rare, experts say:Michigan school shooting is 'so egregious,' the suspect's parents are charged.

Michigan school shooting suspect faces life in prison: What murder, terrorism charges mean

Crumbley was charged Wednesday as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes in what investigators described as a methodical and deliberate massacre.

When asked whether her office was looking into charges for any school officials, McDonald said the investigation was ongoing.

"While the shooter was the one who entered the high school and pulled the trigger, there are other individuals who contributed to the events on Nov. 30, and it's my intention to hold them accountable as well," she said.

Here's what we know Friday:

Prosecutor: Gun was 'Christmas present'

At a news conference Friday, McDonald laid out how Ethan Crumbley got the weapon other warning signs in the days leading up to the shooting.

McDonald said Ethan Crumbley was there when his father bought the 9mm Sig Sauer SP 2022 on Nov. 26. The same day, the younger Crumbley posted photos of the weapon online, calling it his "new beauty." His mom said in a post the following day, "Mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," McDonald said.

"Clearly based on the statements of the shooter (and) the statements of mom, that was his gun," McDonald said.

Prosecutor: School officials knew shooting suspect searched online for ammo, made drawings

Suspect's drawing prompted worries on day of shooting

The 15-year-old suspect was also caught looking up ammunition online while at school before the shooting. McDonald said school officials contacted his mother about the online search, leaving a voicemail and email, but received no response. Crumbley's mother instead texted him the same day, "LOL I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," McDonald said.

Hours before the shooting, Crumbley was found with a disturbing drawing that included a a firearm and someone who appeared to be bleeding, McDonald said.

A teacher took a photo of the drawing, and Crumbley's parents were immediately contacted. When the drawing was brought to a school counselor with Crumbley and his parents present, Crumbley had altered it, McDonald said.

A counselor told the parents their son needed to get counseling, but Crumbley was able to return to class. His parents did not ask him about the firearm at that time nor did they search his backpack, McDonald said.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom," McDonald added.

After reports of the shooting at the school, Jennifer Crumbley texted her son, "Ethan don't do it," McDonald said. James Crumbley drove home to search for the firearm and called 911 to report it missing, saying he believed his son was the shooter, McDonald said.

"I'm angry as a mother. I'm angry as the prosecutor. I'm angry as a person that lives in this county. I'm angry. There were a lot of things that could have been so simple to prevent," McDonald said.

Slew of copycat threats across metro Detroit trouble schools, parents

Copycat threats circulated on social media and districts canceled classes Thursday out of caution for students' safety.

A 17-year-old student in Southfield, about 30 miles from Oxford High School, was arrested Thursday with a semi-automatic pistol. A bomb threat was also made at South Lake High School, about 45 miles from Oxford, and prompted a police investigation.

“If you’re making threats, we’re going to find you,” Bouchard said during a news conference Thursday that was specifically called to address the estimated hundreds of copycat threats reported. “It is ridiculous you’re inflaming the fears and passion of parents, teachers, and the community in the midst of a real tragedy.”

The FBI and Secret Service are also investigating threats.

People who make false threats could face charges for false threat of terrorism, which is a 20-year felony, and misdemeanor malicious use of a telephone, McDonald said.

Meanwhile, parents are walking a fine line of ensuring their children's security without affecting their kids' mental and emotional health.

"I felt like I was going to throw up," said Jill Dillon, 51, recalling dropping off her 14-year-old son to school Wednesday morning. "It was nauseating, thinking that I'm supposed to be taking him someplace safe, and is he really going to be safe?"

David Roden, a 14-year-old freshman at Northville High School, which stayed open Thursday, said the confusion of what's real and what's not was the scariest part.

"Everyone was on edge. It's just kind of weird, being close to the situation," he said.

— Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press

Fake Instagram accounts multiply

Fake social media accounts claiming to be the 15-year-old charged in the Oxford High School shooting began popping up even before his name was released by law enforcement, and some made threats about additional shootings and plans for revenge.

While direct threats may lead to criminal charges, the spread of false information via deceiving accounts is a common problem in the wake of mass shootings, often is not illegal and sometimes does not violate social media platforms’ terms of service.

“Unfortunately, poor taste is not against the law,” said Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police.

It is unlikely any social media accounts that chronicled Crumbley’s alleged criminal activity remain active on these platforms, said Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan's School of Information.

In active threat situations, the social media accounts of alleged perpetrators are taken down through an opaque process, Lampe said. Platforms are alerted either by their own algorithms or by law enforcement.

The tendency of social media platforms to make some user accounts “disappear in the night” can help feed the creation of these fake accounts, Lampe said. However, the common practice of setting up “sock puppets” online would happen regardless, he said.

— Ashley Nerbovig, Detroit Free Press

Contributing: Darcie Moran, Tyler J. Davis, Phoebe Wall Howard, Elisha Anderson, Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press; The Associated Press

Fremont News-Messenger
Published 14 hours ago

Parents of accused killer in Michigan school shooting arrested after vehicle was found in Detroit

DETROIT — James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teen charged in the Oxford High School shooting were located and arrested early Saturday in Detroit, a little more than two hours after a citizen saw their vehicle and called police.

"Yes, they are both in custody and will be on the way to the Oakland County Jail soon," said Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe. "Kudos to Detroit PD and all the other agencies that assisted."

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since about noon Friday after they were charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting deaths at the high school in Michigan. Their son, Ethan Crumbley, 15, is accused of fatally shooting four students and injuring seven others at the suburban Detroit high school on Tuesday.

The Crumbley parents did not show for their arraignment Friday afternoon in Rochester Hills, Michigan. The U.S. Marshals Service issued "Wanted" posters and offered a reward for information leading to their arrests.

The investigation of the shootings and the search for the Crumbleys was led by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. McCabe said the vehicle was found around 11:30 p.m. Friday.

"The owner of the building arrived and saw the car in the back parking lot, knew it didn’t belong there, went to investigate," McCabe told the Detroit Free Press, part of the USA TODAY Network.

The building's owner immediately recognized the car from information put out by law enforcement, checked the license plate, which matched, and called 911.

By about 1:45 a.m., the Crumbleys were under arrest.

Jennifer and James Crumbley were each charged with involuntary manslaughter after Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald said they bought the firearm for their son as a Christmas gift.

During a hearing that started around noon, a lieutenant with the Oakland County Sheriff's Office said the parents were not in custody. The Oakland County Fugitive Team, along with several agencies, were searching for the couple as of Friday evening.

"The action of fleeing and ignoring their attorney certainly adds weight to the charges," Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a release Friday. "They cannot run from their part in this tragedy."

But the family's lawyers said the couple was not fleeing from authorities and were returning to the area after having left town briefly amid the commotion surrounding tragedy.

"The Crumbleys left town on the night of the tragic shooting for their own safety. They are returning to the area to be arraigned," their lawyers Smith and Mariell Lehman said.

The gun had been stored in an unlocked drawer in their house, and Crumbley's parents did not ask where it was when they were called to the school the day of the shooting for a disturbing drawing their son made of a firearm, McDonald said at a news conference Friday.

Ethan Crumbley had posted about the firearm online and researched ammunition while at school, McDonald said the investigation revealed. He was also allowed to return to class on the day of the shooting after the meeting with his parents, she said.

"The facts of this case are so egregious," McDonald said.

Charges for parents of shooter rare, experts say:Michigan school shooting is 'so egregious,' the suspect's parents are charged.

Michigan school shooting suspect faces life in prison: What murder, terrorism charges mean

Crumbley was charged Wednesday as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes in what investigators described as a methodical and deliberate massacre.

When asked whether her office was looking into charges for any school officials, McDonald said the investigation was ongoing.

"While the shooter was the one who entered the high school and pulled the trigger, there are other individuals who contributed to the events on Nov. 30, and it's my intention to hold them accountable as well," she said.

Here's what we know Friday:

Prosecutor: Gun was 'Christmas present'

At a news conference Friday, McDonald laid out how Ethan Crumbley got the weapon other warning signs in the days leading up to the shooting.

McDonald said Ethan Crumbley was there when his father bought the 9mm Sig Sauer SP 2022 on Nov. 26. The same day, the younger Crumbley posted photos of the weapon online, calling it his "new beauty." His mom said in a post the following day, "Mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," McDonald said.

"Clearly based on the statements of the shooter (and) the statements of mom, that was his gun," McDonald said.

Prosecutor: School officials knew shooting suspect searched online for ammo, made drawings

Suspect's drawing prompted worries on day of shooting

The 15-year-old suspect was also caught looking up ammunition online while at school before the shooting. McDonald said school officials contacted his mother about the online search, leaving a voicemail and email, but received no response. Crumbley's mother instead texted him the same day, "LOL I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," McDonald said.

Hours before the shooting, Crumbley was found with a disturbing drawing that included a a firearm and someone who appeared to be bleeding, McDonald said.

A teacher took a photo of the drawing, and Crumbley's parents were immediately contacted. When the drawing was brought to a school counselor with Crumbley and his parents present, Crumbley had altered it, McDonald said.

A counselor told the parents their son needed to get counseling, but Crumbley was able to return to class. His parents did not ask him about the firearm at that time nor did they search his backpack, McDonald said.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom," McDonald added.

After reports of the shooting at the school, Jennifer Crumbley texted her son, "Ethan don't do it," McDonald said. James Crumbley drove home to search for the firearm and called 911 to report it missing, saying he believed his son was the shooter, McDonald said.

"I'm angry as a mother. I'm angry as the prosecutor. I'm angry as a person that lives in this county. I'm angry. There were a lot of things that could have been so simple to prevent," McDonald said.

Slew of copycat threats across metro Detroit trouble schools, parents

Copycat threats circulated on social media and districts canceled classes Thursday out of caution for students' safety.

A 17-year-old student in Southfield, about 30 miles from Oxford High School, was arrested Thursday with a semi-automatic pistol. A bomb threat was also made at South Lake High School, about 45 miles from Oxford, and prompted a police investigation.

“If you’re making threats, we’re going to find you,” Bouchard said during a news conference Thursday that was specifically called to address the estimated hundreds of copycat threats reported. “It is ridiculous you’re inflaming the fears and passion of parents, teachers, and the community in the midst of a real tragedy.”

The FBI and Secret Service are also investigating threats.

People who make false threats could face charges for false threat of terrorism, which is a 20-year felony, and misdemeanor malicious use of a telephone, McDonald said.

Meanwhile, parents are walking a fine line of ensuring their children's security without affecting their kids' mental and emotional health.

"I felt like I was going to throw up," said Jill Dillon, 51, recalling dropping off her 14-year-old son to school Wednesday morning. "It was nauseating, thinking that I'm supposed to be taking him someplace safe, and is he really going to be safe?"

David Roden, a 14-year-old freshman at Northville High School, which stayed open Thursday, said the confusion of what's real and what's not was the scariest part.

"Everyone was on edge. It's just kind of weird, being close to the situation," he said.

— Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press

Fake Instagram accounts multiply

Fake social media accounts claiming to be the 15-year-old charged in the Oxford High School shooting began popping up even before his name was released by law enforcement, and some made threats about additional shootings and plans for revenge.

While direct threats may lead to criminal charges, the spread of false information via deceiving accounts is a common problem in the wake of mass shootings, often is not illegal and sometimes does not violate social media platforms’ terms of service.

“Unfortunately, poor taste is not against the law,” said Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police.

It is unlikely any social media accounts that chronicled Crumbley’s alleged criminal activity remain active on these platforms, said Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan's School of Information.

In active threat situations, the social media accounts of alleged perpetrators are taken down through an opaque process, Lampe said. Platforms are alerted either by their own algorithms or by law enforcement.

The tendency of social media platforms to make some user accounts “disappear in the night” can help feed the creation of these fake accounts, Lampe said. However, the common practice of setting up “sock puppets” online would happen regardless, he said.

— Ashley Nerbovig, Detroit Free Press

Contributing: Darcie Moran, Tyler J. Davis, Phoebe Wall Howard, Elisha Anderson, Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press; The Associated Press

Lancaster Eagle-Gazette
Published 14 hours ago

Parents of accused killer in Michigan school shooting arrested after vehicle was found in Detroit

DETROIT — James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teen charged in the Oxford High School shooting were located and arrested early Saturday in Detroit, a little more than two hours after a citizen saw their vehicle and called police.

"Yes, they are both in custody and will be on the way to the Oakland County Jail soon," said Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe. "Kudos to Detroit PD and all the other agencies that assisted."

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since about noon Friday after they were charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting deaths at the high school in Michigan. Their son, Ethan Crumbley, 15, is accused of fatally shooting four students and injuring seven others at the suburban Detroit high school on Tuesday.

The Crumbley parents did not show for their arraignment Friday afternoon in Rochester Hills, Michigan. The U.S. Marshals Service issued "Wanted" posters and offered a reward for information leading to their arrests.

The investigation of the shootings and the search for the Crumbleys was led by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. McCabe said the vehicle was found around 11:30 p.m. Friday.

"The owner of the building arrived and saw the car in the back parking lot, knew it didn’t belong there, went to investigate," McCabe told the Detroit Free Press, part of the USA TODAY Network.

The building's owner immediately recognized the car from information put out by law enforcement, checked the license plate, which matched, and called 911.

By about 1:45 a.m., the Crumbleys were under arrest.

Jennifer and James Crumbley were each charged with involuntary manslaughter after Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald said they bought the firearm for their son as a Christmas gift.

During a hearing that started around noon, a lieutenant with the Oakland County Sheriff's Office said the parents were not in custody. The Oakland County Fugitive Team, along with several agencies, were searching for the couple as of Friday evening.

"The action of fleeing and ignoring their attorney certainly adds weight to the charges," Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a release Friday. "They cannot run from their part in this tragedy."

But the family's lawyers said the couple was not fleeing from authorities and were returning to the area after having left town briefly amid the commotion surrounding tragedy.

"The Crumbleys left town on the night of the tragic shooting for their own safety. They are returning to the area to be arraigned," their lawyers Smith and Mariell Lehman said.

The gun had been stored in an unlocked drawer in their house, and Crumbley's parents did not ask where it was when they were called to the school the day of the shooting for a disturbing drawing their son made of a firearm, McDonald said at a news conference Friday.

Ethan Crumbley had posted about the firearm online and researched ammunition while at school, McDonald said the investigation revealed. He was also allowed to return to class on the day of the shooting after the meeting with his parents, she said.

"The facts of this case are so egregious," McDonald said.

Charges for parents of shooter rare, experts say:Michigan school shooting is 'so egregious,' the suspect's parents are charged.

Michigan school shooting suspect faces life in prison: What murder, terrorism charges mean

Crumbley was charged Wednesday as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes in what investigators described as a methodical and deliberate massacre.

When asked whether her office was looking into charges for any school officials, McDonald said the investigation was ongoing.

"While the shooter was the one who entered the high school and pulled the trigger, there are other individuals who contributed to the events on Nov. 30, and it's my intention to hold them accountable as well," she said.

Here's what we know Friday:

Prosecutor: Gun was 'Christmas present'

At a news conference Friday, McDonald laid out how Ethan Crumbley got the weapon other warning signs in the days leading up to the shooting.

McDonald said Ethan Crumbley was there when his father bought the 9mm Sig Sauer SP 2022 on Nov. 26. The same day, the younger Crumbley posted photos of the weapon online, calling it his "new beauty." His mom said in a post the following day, "Mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," McDonald said.

"Clearly based on the statements of the shooter (and) the statements of mom, that was his gun," McDonald said.

Prosecutor: School officials knew shooting suspect searched online for ammo, made drawings

Suspect's drawing prompted worries on day of shooting

The 15-year-old suspect was also caught looking up ammunition online while at school before the shooting. McDonald said school officials contacted his mother about the online search, leaving a voicemail and email, but received no response. Crumbley's mother instead texted him the same day, "LOL I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," McDonald said.

Hours before the shooting, Crumbley was found with a disturbing drawing that included a a firearm and someone who appeared to be bleeding, McDonald said.

A teacher took a photo of the drawing, and Crumbley's parents were immediately contacted. When the drawing was brought to a school counselor with Crumbley and his parents present, Crumbley had altered it, McDonald said.

A counselor told the parents their son needed to get counseling, but Crumbley was able to return to class. His parents did not ask him about the firearm at that time nor did they search his backpack, McDonald said.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom," McDonald added.

After reports of the shooting at the school, Jennifer Crumbley texted her son, "Ethan don't do it," McDonald said. James Crumbley drove home to search for the firearm and called 911 to report it missing, saying he believed his son was the shooter, McDonald said.

"I'm angry as a mother. I'm angry as the prosecutor. I'm angry as a person that lives in this county. I'm angry. There were a lot of things that could have been so simple to prevent," McDonald said.

Slew of copycat threats across metro Detroit trouble schools, parents

Copycat threats circulated on social media and districts canceled classes Thursday out of caution for students' safety.

A 17-year-old student in Southfield, about 30 miles from Oxford High School, was arrested Thursday with a semi-automatic pistol. A bomb threat was also made at South Lake High School, about 45 miles from Oxford, and prompted a police investigation.

“If you’re making threats, we’re going to find you,” Bouchard said during a news conference Thursday that was specifically called to address the estimated hundreds of copycat threats reported. “It is ridiculous you’re inflaming the fears and passion of parents, teachers, and the community in the midst of a real tragedy.”

The FBI and Secret Service are also investigating threats.

People who make false threats could face charges for false threat of terrorism, which is a 20-year felony, and misdemeanor malicious use of a telephone, McDonald said.

Meanwhile, parents are walking a fine line of ensuring their children's security without affecting their kids' mental and emotional health.

"I felt like I was going to throw up," said Jill Dillon, 51, recalling dropping off her 14-year-old son to school Wednesday morning. "It was nauseating, thinking that I'm supposed to be taking him someplace safe, and is he really going to be safe?"

David Roden, a 14-year-old freshman at Northville High School, which stayed open Thursday, said the confusion of what's real and what's not was the scariest part.

"Everyone was on edge. It's just kind of weird, being close to the situation," he said.

— Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press

Fake Instagram accounts multiply

Fake social media accounts claiming to be the 15-year-old charged in the Oxford High School shooting began popping up even before his name was released by law enforcement, and some made threats about additional shootings and plans for revenge.

While direct threats may lead to criminal charges, the spread of false information via deceiving accounts is a common problem in the wake of mass shootings, often is not illegal and sometimes does not violate social media platforms’ terms of service.

“Unfortunately, poor taste is not against the law,” said Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police.

It is unlikely any social media accounts that chronicled Crumbley’s alleged criminal activity remain active on these platforms, said Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan's School of Information.

In active threat situations, the social media accounts of alleged perpetrators are taken down through an opaque process, Lampe said. Platforms are alerted either by their own algorithms or by law enforcement.

The tendency of social media platforms to make some user accounts “disappear in the night” can help feed the creation of these fake accounts, Lampe said. However, the common practice of setting up “sock puppets” online would happen regardless, he said.

— Ashley Nerbovig, Detroit Free Press

Contributing: Darcie Moran, Tyler J. Davis, Phoebe Wall Howard, Elisha Anderson, Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press; The Associated Press

Canton Repository
Published 14 hours ago

Parents of accused killer in Michigan school shooting arrested after vehicle was found in Detroit

DETROIT — James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teen charged in the Oxford High School shooting were located and arrested early Saturday in Detroit, a little more than two hours after a citizen saw their vehicle and called police.

"Yes, they are both in custody and will be on the way to the Oakland County Jail soon," said Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe. "Kudos to Detroit PD and all the other agencies that assisted."

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since about noon Friday after they were charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting deaths at the high school in Michigan. Their son, Ethan Crumbley, 15, is accused of fatally shooting four students and injuring seven others at the suburban Detroit high school on Tuesday.

The Crumbley parents did not show for their arraignment Friday afternoon in Rochester Hills, Michigan. The U.S. Marshals Service issued "Wanted" posters and offered a reward for information leading to their arrests.

The investigation of the shootings and the search for the Crumbleys was led by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. McCabe said the vehicle was found around 11:30 p.m. Friday.

"The owner of the building arrived and saw the car in the back parking lot, knew it didn’t belong there, went to investigate," McCabe told the Detroit Free Press, part of the USA TODAY Network.

The building's owner immediately recognized the car from information put out by law enforcement, checked the license plate, which matched, and called 911.

By about 1:45 a.m., the Crumbleys were under arrest.

Jennifer and James Crumbley were each charged with involuntary manslaughter after Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald said they bought the firearm for their son as a Christmas gift.

During a hearing that started around noon, a lieutenant with the Oakland County Sheriff's Office said the parents were not in custody. The Oakland County Fugitive Team, along with several agencies, were searching for the couple as of Friday evening.

"The action of fleeing and ignoring their attorney certainly adds weight to the charges," Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a release Friday. "They cannot run from their part in this tragedy."

But the family's lawyers said the couple was not fleeing from authorities and were returning to the area after having left town briefly amid the commotion surrounding tragedy.

"The Crumbleys left town on the night of the tragic shooting for their own safety. They are returning to the area to be arraigned," their lawyers Smith and Mariell Lehman said.

The gun had been stored in an unlocked drawer in their house, and Crumbley's parents did not ask where it was when they were called to the school the day of the shooting for a disturbing drawing their son made of a firearm, McDonald said at a news conference Friday.

Ethan Crumbley had posted about the firearm online and researched ammunition while at school, McDonald said the investigation revealed. He was also allowed to return to class on the day of the shooting after the meeting with his parents, she said.

"The facts of this case are so egregious," McDonald said.

Charges for parents of shooter rare, experts say:Michigan school shooting is 'so egregious,' the suspect's parents are charged.

Michigan school shooting suspect faces life in prison: What murder, terrorism charges mean

Crumbley was charged Wednesday as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes in what investigators described as a methodical and deliberate massacre.

When asked whether her office was looking into charges for any school officials, McDonald said the investigation was ongoing.

"While the shooter was the one who entered the high school and pulled the trigger, there are other individuals who contributed to the events on Nov. 30, and it's my intention to hold them accountable as well," she said.

Here's what we know Friday:

Prosecutor: Gun was 'Christmas present'

At a news conference Friday, McDonald laid out how Ethan Crumbley got the weapon other warning signs in the days leading up to the shooting.

McDonald said Ethan Crumbley was there when his father bought the 9mm Sig Sauer SP 2022 on Nov. 26. The same day, the younger Crumbley posted photos of the weapon online, calling it his "new beauty." His mom said in a post the following day, "Mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," McDonald said.

"Clearly based on the statements of the shooter (and) the statements of mom, that was his gun," McDonald said.

Prosecutor: School officials knew shooting suspect searched online for ammo, made drawings

Suspect's drawing prompted worries on day of shooting

The 15-year-old suspect was also caught looking up ammunition online while at school before the shooting. McDonald said school officials contacted his mother about the online search, leaving a voicemail and email, but received no response. Crumbley's mother instead texted him the same day, "LOL I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," McDonald said.

Hours before the shooting, Crumbley was found with a disturbing drawing that included a a firearm and someone who appeared to be bleeding, McDonald said.

A teacher took a photo of the drawing, and Crumbley's parents were immediately contacted. When the drawing was brought to a school counselor with Crumbley and his parents present, Crumbley had altered it, McDonald said.

A counselor told the parents their son needed to get counseling, but Crumbley was able to return to class. His parents did not ask him about the firearm at that time nor did they search his backpack, McDonald said.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom," McDonald added.

After reports of the shooting at the school, Jennifer Crumbley texted her son, "Ethan don't do it," McDonald said. James Crumbley drove home to search for the firearm and called 911 to report it missing, saying he believed his son was the shooter, McDonald said.

"I'm angry as a mother. I'm angry as the prosecutor. I'm angry as a person that lives in this county. I'm angry. There were a lot of things that could have been so simple to prevent," McDonald said.

Slew of copycat threats across metro Detroit trouble schools, parents

Copycat threats circulated on social media and districts canceled classes Thursday out of caution for students' safety.

A 17-year-old student in Southfield, about 30 miles from Oxford High School, was arrested Thursday with a semi-automatic pistol. A bomb threat was also made at South Lake High School, about 45 miles from Oxford, and prompted a police investigation.

“If you’re making threats, we’re going to find you,” Bouchard said during a news conference Thursday that was specifically called to address the estimated hundreds of copycat threats reported. “It is ridiculous you’re inflaming the fears and passion of parents, teachers, and the community in the midst of a real tragedy.”

The FBI and Secret Service are also investigating threats.

People who make false threats could face charges for false threat of terrorism, which is a 20-year felony, and misdemeanor malicious use of a telephone, McDonald said.

Meanwhile, parents are walking a fine line of ensuring their children's security without affecting their kids' mental and emotional health.

"I felt like I was going to throw up," said Jill Dillon, 51, recalling dropping off her 14-year-old son to school Wednesday morning. "It was nauseating, thinking that I'm supposed to be taking him someplace safe, and is he really going to be safe?"

David Roden, a 14-year-old freshman at Northville High School, which stayed open Thursday, said the confusion of what's real and what's not was the scariest part.

"Everyone was on edge. It's just kind of weird, being close to the situation," he said.

— Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press

Fake Instagram accounts multiply

Fake social media accounts claiming to be the 15-year-old charged in the Oxford High School shooting began popping up even before his name was released by law enforcement, and some made threats about additional shootings and plans for revenge.

While direct threats may lead to criminal charges, the spread of false information via deceiving accounts is a common problem in the wake of mass shootings, often is not illegal and sometimes does not violate social media platforms’ terms of service.

“Unfortunately, poor taste is not against the law,” said Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police.

It is unlikely any social media accounts that chronicled Crumbley’s alleged criminal activity remain active on these platforms, said Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan's School of Information.

In active threat situations, the social media accounts of alleged perpetrators are taken down through an opaque process, Lampe said. Platforms are alerted either by their own algorithms or by law enforcement.

The tendency of social media platforms to make some user accounts “disappear in the night” can help feed the creation of these fake accounts, Lampe said. However, the common practice of setting up “sock puppets” online would happen regardless, he said.

— Ashley Nerbovig, Detroit Free Press

Contributing: Darcie Moran, Tyler J. Davis, Phoebe Wall Howard, Elisha Anderson, Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press; The Associated Press

Massillon Independent
Published 14 hours ago

Chief: Michigan suspect's parents found hiding in building

School Shooting Michigan James, left, and Jennifer Crumbley are shown during the video arraignment of their son, Ethan Crumbley in Rochester Hills, Mich., on Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against the Crumbleys whose 15-year-old son is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school. ( (Uncredited)

December 04, 2021 at 8:33 am EST
By COREY WILLIAMS and ED WHITE

PONTIAC, Mich. — (AP) — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at Oxford High School were found hiding in a Detroit building early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, officials said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in a commercial building that housed artwork, Detroit Police Chief James E. White said at a news conference.

The Crumbleys' attorney, Shannon Smith, said Friday that the pair had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety” and would be returning to Oxford to be arraigned. But White seemed to dismiss the possibility that was their intention.

“This isn’t indicative of turning yourself in — hiding in a warehouse,” White said.

White said the couple “were aided in getting into the building,” and that a person who helped them may also face charges.

A Detroit business owner spotted a car tied to the Crumbleys in his parking lot late Friday, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A woman seen near the vehicle ran away when the business owner called 911, McCabe said. The couple was later located and arrested by Detroit police.

He added that the parents appeared to be “distressed” when they were captured.

“Head down... just very upset,” he said of one of the parents.

A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the Crumbleys on Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.

The Crumbleys committed "egregious" acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

Authorities had been looking for the couple since Friday afternoon. Late Friday, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to their arrests.

The couple was expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail, McCabe said.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He's charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a "war zone" and won't be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, “No discipline was warranted.”

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. ... I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah,” she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”

___

White reported from Detroit. Associated Press journalist Mike Householder in Detroit and David Eggert in Lansing, Mich., also contributed to this report.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Latest Trending

WHIO 1290 AM/95.7 FM
Published 15 hours ago

James and Jennifer Crumbley caught, arrested after vehicle is found in Detroit

James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teen charged in the Oxford High School shooting, were located and arrested early Saturday in Detroit after a citizen saw their vehicle and called police.

"Yes, they are both in custody and will be on the way to the Oakland County Jail soon," said Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe. "Kudos to Detroit PD and all the other agencies that assisted."

Police arrived at the scene, in the area of the 1100 block of Bellevue near E. Lafayette, about 10 p.m. or 10:30 p.m., Detroit Police Chief James White told reporters about 3 a.m. Saturday morning.

It's believed the Crumbleys — facing charges of involuntary manslaughter connected to the Oxford High School mass shooting in which their son is accused — were let into a commercial building by someone, White said.

Police know who that someone is and those who aided the couple could face criminal charges, White said.

The Crumbleys were found hiding inside and were "distressed" White said. They were unarmed.

He said security video had helped officers by revealing one of the Crumbleys entering the building.

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys most of the day Friday after they were charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting deaths at the high school in northern suburban Detroit. Their son, Ethan Crumbley, is charged with terrorism and first-degree murder in the case.

The Crumbley parents did not show for their arraignment Friday afternoon in Rochester Hills and the U.S. Marshals Service offered a reward for information leading to their arrests.

The tip led officers to search through the Bellevue building, home to several businesses. Police could be seen outside the building and in SWAT gear outside a nearby home about 12:45 a.m. as other officers checked the area, combing nearby properties with flashlights.

The area on Detroit's near east side is peppered with light industrial buildings and is located a couple blocks north of the Detroit River, just west of Belle Isle.

White praised his officers, and said Detroit was going to use whatever manpower was necessary to aid the victims from the high school shooting in Oxford Township, which is about a 45 minute drive from where the Crumbleys were discovered. The Tuesday tragedy has touched the whole country, he said.

"We've got a number of victims in Oxford, it takes as much manpower as it takes. ... We're tired of this," he said. "I mean, it's awful."

The investigation of the shootings and the search for the Crumbleys was led by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. McCabe previously said the vehicle was found around 11:30 p.m. Friday.

“The owner of the building arrived and saw the car in the back parking lot, knew it didn’t belong there, went to investigate,” McCabe told the Free Press.

More:Sheriff's Office blasts prosecutor for parents of Oxford shooting suspect being on the lam

The building’s owner immediately recognized the car from information put out by law enforcement, checked the license plate, which matched, and called 911.

“There was a woman nearby sitting near the car smoking a cigarette,” McCabe said, adding that she walked away.

Sean O’Neill, 40, of Detroit, looked on with his wife, Jocelyn, as police worked about 12:30 a.m. The two had responded to a security company call that the alarm to their rare tropical plants business inside the Bellevue building was triggered. It could have been the cops working, he noted.

The couple had arrived about midnight to see the massive police response.

“They’ve been searching with the dogs back there and you see the flashlights in the woods,” he said, waiting for a chance to turn the alarm off.

As of 1:10 a.m., police were stopping passers-by, shining lights and requesting information about whether people had seen anything

By about 1:45 a.m., the Crumbleys were under arrest.

The couple was turned over to the U.S. Marshals and the Oakland County Sheriff's Office, White said. They are expected to be arraigned on the criminal charges later Saturday.

Staff writer Christina Hall contributed to this report. Contact Darcie Moran: dmoran@freepress.com. Contact Tyler Davis: tjdavis@freepress.com.

Cincinnati Enquirer
Published 15 hours ago

A discomfort with Western liberalism is growing in Eastern Europe

Laszlo Magas, left, and Laszlo Nagy. Both men were anti-communists during the Soviet period and sought an opening to the West. They are pictured near the Hungary-Austria border, which young protesters opened in 1989.

Joanna Kakissis for NPR

BUDAPEST, Hungary — When President Biden greets scores of nations at his virtual "Summit for Democracy" this coming week, one member of the Western alliance won't be there.

Hungary, on the Eastern edge of the European Union, was not invited.

Washington and EU leaders in Brussels have repeatedly accused the country's ultranationalist government, led by Prime Minister Viktor Orban, of undermining democracy. Biden once name-checked Hungary when referring to the "thugs of the world."

But Laszlo Magas, a retired professor who helped bring an end to communism in Hungary, chalks up his country's political isolation to one thing: Western liberal bias.

"Hungary is not the West's colony," says Magas, an Orban supporter who echoes many of the prime minister's views. "The whole world is being misled about us. The mainstream media is full of fake news about us. The liberals want you to think Hungary doesn't know what democracy is because we don't share their beliefs."

Europe, he says, is ideologically divided between the conservative East and the more liberal West, something like red-and-blue America.

"And the border is the [former] Iron Curtain," Magas says. "We in the East are the ones protecting traditional European values, Christian values, while the West has gone crazy."

Many in Eastern Europe have concluded that Western liberalism is not a good fit

Orban and his Fidesz party have become the flag-bearers of this mindset during their decade in power. The Hungarian government has repeatedly clashed with Brussels over migration, multiculturalism, press freedom and, most recently, LGBTQ rights.

Their target in this culture war has been liberal democracy, which Orban has tried to equate with leftist and "unpatriotic" beliefs. Orban is instead promoting "illiberal democracy", a term coined by journalist Fareed Zakaria to describe countries where elected leaders undermine checks on power.

Orban first used the term in a 2014 speech promoting governance in the national interest, citing China, Russia and Turkey as examples. Four years later, after his party won in a landslide election, he declared that "we have replaced a shipwrecked liberal democracy with a 21st-century Christian democracy" that supports tradition and security.

"He's trying to position himself to play the role that [Cuban leader] Fidel Castro played for the left in the 1970s," says political scientist Ivan Krastev, who with Stephen Holmes co-wrote The Light That Failed: Why the West Is Losing the Fight for Democracy, an examination of Eastern Europe's disillusionment with liberal democracy.

"The leftists fell in love with Castro for standing up for things they believed in, for being a revolutionary. Orban and Hungary are playing the same role now, but for conservatives," Krastev says.

Hungary has become a magnet for European far-right nationalists and American conservatives. Fox News host Tucker Carlson took his show to Hungary for a week this August, treating Orban to a glowing interview.

Former Vice President Mike Pence followed in September, where he said he hoped the US would overturn abortion rights. Pence also praised the Hungarian government's promotion of "traditional family values" at the Budapest Demographics Summit, an annual paean to increasing population through more childbirth instead of immigration.

Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban gives a press conference following a meeting of prime ministers of central Europe's informal body of cooperation, called the Visegrad Group (V4) in Budapest, Hungary, last month.

Attila Kisbenedek / AFP via Getty Images

And next year, the American Conservative Union is planning to hold a version of its Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Budapest.

The two groups — nationalists from behind the former Iron Curtain, and U.S. conservatives aligned with former President Donald Trump — exploit the same fear, Krastev says, "and this is the fear that there are not enough of us, that we're living in the world in which we are going to be replaced, in which our numbers are shrinking and in which we are going to lose our identity."

The end of communism meant political and cultural choices for the people of Eastern Europe

Laszlo Magas did not have those fears when he and other democracy activists pushed in 1989 to bring down the communist system and its strict limits on freedom of speech, assembly, religion and movement.

Magas, then a forestry engineering professor in the city of Sopron, helped organize a protest known as the Pan-European Picnic in a field near the border with Austria.

After thousands of young Hungarians and East Germans gathered there, Hungary's government opened the border, months before the fall of the Berlin Wall. It was the first breach of the Iron Curtain.

"We thought we could be free as part of a unified Europe if only we could open that border," Magas says.

But the initial elation of freedom gave way to culture shock, as Eastern European economies struggled, and millions migrated west.

Laszlo Nagy, another organizer of the picnic protest, says communism put Soviet bloc societies into "the deep freezer" after World War II. "And when we emerged from this deep freezer in 1990, we went right into the microwave," he says. "The changes came too fast."

Krastev, who grew up in Bulgaria, another Iron Curtain country, says an existential crisis brewed in Eastern Europe.

"We wanted to be like the West but the very moment you want to be like somebody else, it means that probably this somebody else is better than you," he says. "And then you start to have the fear of what about our own identity? What is going to happen?"

These questions have lingered in Hungary, a country of 10 million that has long seen itself as a small nation fighting to survive a long list of occupiers, including the Soviet-backed communists.

"During communism, Hungarian people were basically told by the Soviets how to live," says Natalia Borza, a philosopher and linguist in Budapest. "And OK, 30 years passed but still we have the memory of what it feels like being under someone else's rules."

Orban the anti-communist is following his own path of illiberalism

Orban has maintained his defiant message since he was a communist-fighting law student in the 1980s. In 2015, when more than a million asylum-seekers arrived in Europe, he presented them as invaders seeking to erase European demographics and culture. He rejected EU mandates to take in relocated refugees and conform to Brussels' standards for rule of law.

More recently, at the demographics summit, Orban accused the "Western left wing" of trying to "relativize the notion of family."

"Its tools for doing so are gender ideology and the LGBTQ lobby, which are attacking our children," he said.

Orban's government recently passed a controversial law restricting the teaching of LGBTQ issues in schools. It was prompted by the publication in 2020 of Wonderland Is For Everyone, a children's storybook featuring gay, nonbinary and transgender characters.

Boldizsar Nagy, who edited the storybook, says he received death threats as the government attacked it.

"It became a tool for them, and they used it as the symbol of the 'Western enemy,' of Western decay," he says.

Boldizsar Nagy is the editor of Wonderland Is for Everyone, a children's storybook featuring gay, nonbinary and transgender characters. The book's publication has led to an outcry on the right in Hungary.

Joanna Kakissis for NPR

The new law means books with LGBTQ themes are wrapped in plastic and forbidden to be sold within 650 feet of schools or churches. It also forbids high schools to invite educators like Eszter Ari, an evolutionary biologist and LGBTQ advocate, to speak about tolerance.

Ari says the government wants Hungary's LGBTQ citizens "to be quiet about who they are, or leave the country."

"The government has made us, their own citizens, the enemy," she says. "They want to divide the people so they are afraid and don't think about things like government corruption."

The law has angered Western European leaders like Mark Rutte, prime minister of the Netherlands, which, in 2001, became the first country in the world to approve same-sex marriage. Hungary "has no business being in the EU anymore," Rutte said this summer.

The European Union is threatening to cut funding to Hungary, which concerns even Hungarians who support Orban's stand in the culture wars.

Eszter Ari is an educator, evolutionary biologist and LGBTQ activist who advocates tolerance.

Joanna Kakissis for NPR

The divisions in Hungarian society are growing, along with efforts to lessen them

Seventeen-year-old Annamaria Veszten considers herself a conservative and says she appreciates Orban fighting for traditional values. But she's lived her whole life in a Hungary that's part of the European Union. "It's very good for our economy to be part of it," she says.

I met Veszten this summer in Esztergom, a city north of Budapest, that hosted a conference organized by Mathias Corvinus Collegium, a private educational institution that recently received more than $1.7 billion from Orban's government. The conference headlined talks by American conservatives including Carlson, writer Rod Dreher and talk radio host Dennis Prager.

Veszten came away troubled that some attendees ridiculed and booed speakers with liberal views.

"It is not just Europe divided but also this country," she said. "I don't feel like we are part of one nation. It's more like two nations already.

Congregants at the Hungarian Evangelical Fellowship, a modest Methodist church on the outskirts of Budapest, feel the same way.

On a recent Sunday morning, a woman offers a prayer for Western-funded nonprofits that the government has labeled foreign agents. Another offers thanks for the church's tall, white-bearded pastor, Gabor Ivanyi.

"I know what it feels like to be cast out," Ivanyi says. "So I decided to become the kind of pastor who shows solidarity with those who are marginalized."

Like Orban and Magas, who helped organize the 1989 protest to bring down the Iron Curtain, the clergyman fought the communist system. Hungary's Soviet-backed government evicted him from his church and boarded it up. For years, he was forced to preach on the streets.

Pastor Gabor Ivanyi of the Hungarian Evangelical Fellowship, a modest Methodist church on the outskirts of Budapest. Ivanyi worries about a growing left-right divide in Hungarian society.

Joanna Kakissis for NPR

Ivanyi met Orban while fighting communism, and at first they were allies. He baptized two of Orban's children and renewed the prime minister's wedding vows. But the pastor says he is angry that Orban uses Christianity to vilify migrants and political critics.

"The protection of Christian values should not be handled by politicians," Ivanyi says, "because politicizing Christianity has steered European civilization to its utter demise twice."

There are signs that culture wars have limits. Orban is wooing two Eastern powers — China and Russia — that both Hungarians and conservative culture warriors associate with communist suppression.

"Orban sees relations with these countries as pragmatic, especially financially, and also as strategy in his fight with Brussels," says Andras Kosa, an Orban biographer. "But Hungarians do not trust Moscow and Beijing and do not want to get too close to them."

Hungarians go to the polls next spring, and Orban will face a newly united opposition. Its candidate is Peter Marki-Zay, a Christian conservative who is the mayor of Hodmezovasarhely, a small city in rural Hungary.

Marki-Zay is running on an anti-corruption platform and promises to defend Hungary's identity, but not at the expense of democratic institutions. He also says he will repair relations with the EU and Washington.

"I still stand for Western values," Marki-Zay told the AP last month. "We cannot accept a corrupt thug ... who betrays Western values and who is now a servant of Communist China and Russia."

He also took a page out of Trump's playbook and suggested that Brussels and Washington are planning to meddle in the upcoming election.

"Even the entirety of the Left won't be able to stop us," he says.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

WCBE 90.5 FM - Columbus
Published 15 hours ago

Penobscots don't want ancestors' scalping to be whitewashed

Most Americans know about atrocities endured by Native Americans after the arrival of European settlers — wars, disease, stolen land.

41 mins ago

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Most Americans know Native Americans endured atrocities after the arrival of European settlers: wars, disease, stolen land.

But it’s far uglier than that.

Members of the Penobscot Nation in Maine have produced an educational film addressing how European settlers scalped — killed — Indigenous people during the British colonial era, spurred for decades by cash bounties and with the government’s blessing.

“It was genocide,” said Dawn Neptune Adams, one of the three Penobscot Nation members featured in the film, called “Bounty.”

She said the point of the effort isn’t to make any Americans feel defensive or blamed. The filmmakers say they simply want to ensure this history isn’t whitewashed by promoting a fuller understanding of the nation’s past.

At the heart of the project is a chilling declaration by Spencer Phips, lieutenant governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay.

Issued in November 1755, it gave “His Majesty’s Subjects” license to kill Penobscots for “this entire month.” The reward was about $12,000 in today’s dollars for the scalp of a man, and half that for a woman’s scalp. The amount was slightly less for a child. Settlers who killed Indigenous people were sometimes rewarded with land, in addition to money, expanding settlers’ reach while displacing tribes from their ancestral lands.

The declaration is familiar to many Penobscots because a copy of the document was displayed at the tribal offices at Indian Island, Maine.

“If every American knew the whole history of this country, even the dark and uncomfortable parts, it would help us to get along better and to understand each other better,” said Maulian Dana, who co-directed the film with Neptune Adams.

Both Europeans and Native Americans engaged in scalping, but English colonists greatly expanded the practice when the government sanctioned the effort with bounties, the filmmakers said.

The first known colonial scalping order is from 1675. That’s just a few short decades after the first Thanksgiving in 1621, when Pilgrims gathered with Wampanoag people for a harvest celebration, said Chris Newell, who is Passamaquoddy and wrote “If You Lived During the Plimoth Thanksgiving.”

All told, there were more than 70 bounty proclamations encouraging white colonists to kill tribal members in what’s now New England, and another 50 government-sanctioned proclamations elsewhere across the country, the filmmakers’ research found. State and colonial governments paid out at least 375 bounties for Indigenous people across New England between 1675 to 1760, they said.

Emerson Baker, a Salem State University professor who specializes in New England history, called the tribal education effort “a powerful course correction.”

“Most people realize that Native Americans were here first and that the colonists did their best to remove them from the land. They just have no idea of the extremes that it took,” Baker said. “Pretty much any Native American man, woman or child was considered fair game at times, and sometimes by the government.”

Collaborating with the Massachusetts-based Upstander Project, the filmmakers released “Bounty” in November during National Native American Heritage Month.

Neptune Adams and Dana, along with Tim Shay and their families, were filmed at the Old State House in Boston. It’s the same location where Lt. Gov. Phips’ scalping order was signed.

In “Bounty,” the three participants describe having nightmares of Penobscots being chased through the woods, and discuss the dehumanization and massacre of their people.

“When you learn about a people’s humanity, that affects how you treat my kids, how you vote on public policy, how you may view my people,” Dana said.

Accompanying the short video is a 200-page study guide aimed at teachers. Several school districts, including Portland Public Schools in Maine’s largest city, are purchasing licenses for the video and plan to use the study guides to assist instruction.

In Portland, the scalp bounties will be included as one element in a curriculum that will bring the school district into compliance with a 2001 law requiring students to be taught Wabanaki Studies focusing on Native Americans in Maine, said Fiona Hopper, social studies teacher leader and Wabanaki studies coordinator.

“Students and teachers will see in ‘Bounty’ the ongoing endurance and resistance of Penobscot Nation citizens,” Hopper said.

WFMJ 21 - TV
Published 15 hours ago

Chief: Michigan suspect's parents found hiding in building

A sheriff's office in Michigan says the parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a high school have been caught early Saturday.

5 hrs 49 mins ago

By COREY WILLIAMS and ED WHITE
Associated Press

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at Oxford High School were found hiding in a Detroit building early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, officials said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in a commercial building that housed artwork, Detroit Police Chief James E. White said at a news conference.

The Crumbleys' attorney, Shannon Smith, said Friday that the pair had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety” and told The Associated Press they would be returning to Oxford to be arraigned. But White seemed to dismiss the possibility that was their intention.

“This isn’t indicative of turning yourself in — hiding in a warehouse,” White said.

White said the couple “were aided in getting into the building,” and that a person who helped them may also face charges.

A Detroit business owner spotted a car tied to the Crumbleys in his parking lot late Friday, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A woman seen near the vehicle ran away when the business owner called 911, McCabe said. The couple was later located and arrested by Detroit police.

He added that the parents appeared to be “distressed” when they were captured.

“Head down... just very upset,” he said of one of the parents.

A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the Crumbleys on Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.

The Crumbleys committed “egregious” acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

Authorities had been looking for the couple since Friday afternoon. Late Friday, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to their arrests.

The couple was expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail, McCabe said.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He’s charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a “war zone” and won’t be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, “No discipline was warranted.”

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. ... I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah,” she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”

___

WFMJ 21 - TV
Published 15 hours ago

Seen on TV: 11/29/21

Seen on TV

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Posted: Nov 29, 2021 / 03:27 AM EST / Updated: Nov 29, 2021 / 03:27 AM EST

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WJW TV - My Fox Cleveland
Published 15 hours ago

Penobscots don't want ancestors' scalping to be whitewashed

Caption

Dawn Neptune Adams holds a copy of the Phips Proclamation of 1755, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021, in Bangor, Maine. Adams recently co-directed a film that focuses on the proclamation, one of the dozens of government-issued bounty proclamations that directed colonial settlers to hunt, scalp and kill Indigenous people for money. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Credit: Robert F. Bukaty

Credit: Robert F. Bukaty

Nation & World

By DAVID SHARP, Associated Press

38 minutes ago

Most Americans know about atrocities endured by Native Americans after the arrival of European settlers — wars, disease, stolen land

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Most Americans know Native Americans endured atrocities after the arrival of European settlers: wars, disease, stolen land.

But it’s far uglier than that.

Members of the Penobscot Nation in Maine have produced an educational film addressing how European settlers scalped — killed — Indigenous people during the British colonial era, spurred for decades by cash bounties and with the government’s blessing.

“It was genocide,” said Dawn Neptune Adams, one of the three Penobscot Nation members featured in the film, called “Bounty.”

She said the point of the effort isn’t to make any Americans feel defensive or blamed. The filmmakers say they simply want to ensure this history isn’t whitewashed by promoting a fuller understanding of the nation’s past.

At the heart of the project is a chilling declaration by Spencer Phips, lieutenant governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay.

Issued in November 1755, it gave “His Majesty’s Subjects” license to kill Penobscots for “this entire month.” The reward was about $12,000 in today’s dollars for the scalp of a man, and half that for a woman’s scalp. The amount was slightly less for a child. Settlers who killed Indigenous people were sometimes rewarded with land, in addition to money, expanding settlers’ reach while displacing tribes from their ancestral lands.

The declaration is familiar to many Penobscots because a copy of the document was displayed at the tribal offices at Indian Island, Maine.

“If every American knew the whole history of this country, even the dark and uncomfortable parts, it would help us to get along better and to understand each other better,” said Maulian Dana, who co-directed the film with Neptune Adams.

Both Europeans and Native Americans engaged in scalping, but English colonists greatly expanded the practice when the government sanctioned the effort with bounties, the filmmakers said.

The first known colonial scalping order is from 1675. That’s just a few short decades after the first Thanksgiving in 1621, when Pilgrims gathered with Wampanoag people for a harvest celebration, said Chris Newell, who is Passamaquoddy and wrote “If You Lived During the Plimoth Thanksgiving.”

All told, there were more than 70 bounty proclamations encouraging white colonists to kill tribal members in what’s now New England, and another 50 government-sanctioned proclamations elsewhere across the country, the filmmakers’ research found. State and colonial governments paid out at least 375 bounties for Indigenous people across New England between 1675 to 1760, they said.

Emerson Baker, a Salem State University professor who specializes in New England history, called the tribal education effort “a powerful course correction.”

“Most people realize that Native Americans were here first and that the colonists did their best to remove them from the land. They just have no idea of the extremes that it took,” Baker said. “Pretty much any Native American man, woman or child was considered fair game at times, and sometimes by the government.”

Collaborating with the Massachusetts-based Upstander Project, the filmmakers released “Bounty” in November during National Native American Heritage Month.

Neptune Adams and Dana, along with Tim Shay and their families, were filmed at the Old State House in Boston. It’s the same location where Lt. Gov. Phips’ scalping order was signed.

In “Bounty,” the three participants describe having nightmares of Penobscots being chased through the woods, and discuss the dehumanization and massacre of their people.

“When you learn about a people’s humanity, that affects how you treat my kids, how you vote on public policy, how you may view my people,” Dana said.

Accompanying the short video is a 200-page study guide aimed at teachers. Several school districts, including Portland Public Schools in Maine’s largest city, are purchasing licenses for the video and plan to use the study guides to assist instruction.

In Portland, the scalp bounties will be included as one element in a curriculum that will bring the school district into compliance with a 2001 law requiring students to be taught Wabanaki Studies focusing on Native Americans in Maine, said Fiona Hopper, social studies teacher leader and Wabanaki studies coordinator.

“Students and teachers will see in ‘Bounty’ the ongoing endurance and resistance of Penobscot Nation citizens,” Hopper said.

___

Follow David Sharp on Twitter at https://twitter.com/David_Sharp_AP

Caption

Dawn Neptune Adams stands on the banks of the Penobscot River, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021, on Indian Island, Maine. When Adams was a child she was one of the many Penobscot and Passamaquoddy people who were removed from their homes by the state of Maine and placed with white foster families. She recently co-directed a film that focuses on the Phips Proclamation of 1755, one of the dozens of government-issued bounty proclamations that directed colonial settlers to hunt, scalp and kill Indigenous people for money. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Credit: Robert F. Bukaty

Caption

Dawn Neptune Adams stands on the banks of the Penobscot River, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021, on Indian Island, Maine. When Adams was a child she was one of the many Penobscot and Passamaquoddy people who were removed from their homes by the state of Maine and placed with white foster families. She recently co-directed a film that focuses on the Phips Proclamation of 1755, one of the dozens of government-issued bounty proclamations that directed colonial settlers to hunt, scalp and kill Indigenous people for money. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Credit: Robert F. Bukaty

Credit: Robert F. Bukaty

Dayton Daily News
Published 15 hours ago

New business owners keep freight company moving

Four new business owners have taken over Tri-State Expedited Service to keep the freight shipping company rolling down the highway.

Mike Lawrence, Korey Walper, Corey Crane, and Chad Nicholls recently assumed ownership of the company and saved it from potential ruin. The men stepped in to continue the Tri-State legacy, which began in 1978 with company founders Ron and Glenna Chidester.

Following the passing of Mr. Chidester in 2016, Mrs. Chidester maintained ownership, but the business fell on hard times several years later when a senior management team walked out of the company, leaving her with the difficult decision to either close it or find a viable buyer. Mrs. Chidester, who was well into her senior years, turned to Mr. Walper for help. At that time, he owned a fleet company but initially doubted whether he could make it work.

Staff morale was low, the financial records were in disarray, the IT systems were outdated, the building was falling apart, the fleet of trucks were depleted, and the customer base was dwindling, he said.

“When I walked in here the situation was dire,” Mr. Walper said.

But in February, 2020, he enlisted the help of his three partners and got to work. Mr. Lawrence, who has a background in the insurance industry, took over as the company president, Mr. Crane became the chief financial officer, Mr. Nicholls was named chief information officer, and Mr. Walper took on the role of chief executive officer.

“We came out of the gate swinging and we had an incredible February,” Mr. Walper said. “Probably the best number in years. Our first month here, we knocked it out of the park.”

The onset of the coronavirus pandemic quickly diminished those initial gains, but with careful adjustments, the men were able to steer the company through a five-month rough patch, steadily growing the business to new record numbers.

“We are going to post the best year this company has seen in 25 years,” Mr. Walper said.

Tri-State manages a fleet of 180 trucks for expedited shipping services throughout the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Of that fleet, 60 trucks are company-owned, which offers greater control as it eliminates the possibility that a driver would refuse to pick up a load, something an independent driver can do, Mr. Walper said.

The remainder of the fleet is operated by independent contractors or fleet companies with exclusive lease agreements to ensure those trucks will only carry freight for Tri-State.

Timothy Bennor, the owner of TJ Trucking Enterprises, has been doing business with Tri-State for more than 20 years. With his lease agreement, Mr. Bennor receives dispatching services and safety and compliance guidance for his company through Tri-State.

“It takes the pressure off of me so my whole job is buying the trucks, recruiting the drivers, and maintaining the fleet,” Mr. Bennor said. “Without them, there would be a lot more work for me to do so this is a fantastic partnership.”

In regard to working with the new owners, Mr. Bennor couldn’t be more pleased.

“It’s been a blessing,” he said. “These guys know their stuff and they care; I didn’t feel that way about the previous management. I own 17 trucks and 15 of them are here for a reason.”

As an expedited carrier, Tri-State quickly moves inventory from one business to another, giving the company an edge over traditional trucking firms where it may take longer, Mr. Lawrence said.

The current supply chain crisis, with a backlog of shipping containers and empty shelves, has led to a greater need for their services, he added. Customers vary, from large manufacturers that need parts to keep a production line moving, to a port-of-entry with cargo freight sitting in limbo, to a sports team with equipment to move to a different city for a playoff game.

“We will go wherever we need to go to pick up a load. Our trucks stay out, and they are all over the country at any time, so if a customer calls us we will pick it up,” Mr. Lawrence said.

While focusing efforts on creating a bigger customer base, the partners have also invested heavily in the company with the addition of new trucks, new computer software, a new phone system, a new roof, new flooring, and renovated bathrooms. Even the coffee is new and improved, he said.

The company employs a full-time staff of 137, which includes 50 employee drivers. Maintaining that staff is crucial, and finding good drivers continues to be the greatest challenge, Mr. Walper said. To address the issue, the company has focused on a robust recruiting process while maintaining good customer service.

“The hardest part of the driver situation is that trucking is always a secondary option,” he said. “You can’t come out of high school and aspire to be a truck driver. We get a lot of people coming to it later in life, like a husband and wife team who want to drive a truck as a way to see the country.”

Thus far, the partnership is working and the men use each other’s strengths to further progress, Mr. Lawrence said. In October, negotiations were finalized with the Chidester estate following the death of Mrs. Chidester, and they became official company owners.

“We get along exceedingly well, but more than that our management philosophy really aligns,” Mr. Lawrence said. “Before there was a top-down approach; with us, it is very lateral.”

In addition to providing expedited ground service, Tri-State also offers air freight service, dedicated truckload service, and specialized equipment logistics. The company is located on Cummings Road in Millbury.

Toledo Blade
Published 15 hours ago

Darlene Hard, 3-time major tennis champion, dies at 85

Caption

FILE - Darlene Hard hits a forehand to Zsuzsa Kormoczy during a quarterfinal on June 28, 1955 at Wimbledon tennis championships in London. Hard, an aggressive serve-and-volley player who won three major singles titles as well as 18 major doubles titles in a Hall of Fame tennis career, died Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021, after a brief illness. She was 85. (AP Photo, File)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Nation & World

By BETH HARRIS, Associated Press

9 hours ago

Hall of Fame tennis player Darlene Hard has died at age 85

Darlene Hard, an aggressive serve-and-volley player who won three major singles titles and 18 major doubles titles in a Hall of Fame tennis career, has died. She was 85.

She died Thursday at Northridge Hospital in the Los Angeles area after a brief illness, according to Mona Cravens, director of student publications at the University of Southern California, where Hard worked for 45 years.

Hard appeared in seven major championship singles finals, winning titles at the 1960 French Championships and the 1960 and ‘61 U.S. Championships — the tournaments that preceded the French and U.S. Opens. She was a Wimbledon finalist in 1957 (losing to Althea Gibson) and ’59, and reached the quarterfinals of the Australian championships in 1962.

She had even greater success in doubles. She won three French titles, four Wimbledon titles (including 1957 with Gibson) and six U.S. championships with eight different partners. In mixed doubles, she won twice at the French and three times at Wimbledon, partnering with Rod Laver for titles in 1959 and '60.

Hard was ranked in the U.S. top 10 every year between 1954 and 1963, including four times as No. 1. She rose to No. 2 in the world in 1960 and '61.

She helped the U.S. win Wightman Cup titles against Britain four times and played on the winning U.S. Fed Cup team in 1963.

Hard played at Pomona College in 1957, competing in the first intercollegiate championship in 1958 and winning the national title. She was inducted into the school's athletic Hall of Fame in 1974. She went into the Intercollegiate Tennis Hall of Fame in 1997.

She became a member of the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1973.

Darlene Ruth Hard was born on Jan. 5, 1936, in Los Angeles. She was taught her power game by her mother, Ruth, on public courts in Southern California. She came along at a time when the women's game was transitioning from lengthy baseline rallies to an all-court style that was well-suited to Hard's aggressiveness.

The majority of Hard's success came during tennis' amateur era. The professional era began in 1968, and Hard played only briefly as a pro in the 1969 U.S. Open. She won her last doubles title in New York that year at age 33, six years after she had retired from serious competition to teach tennis. She lost in the second round of singles.

Cravens met Hard when she and her husband took tennis lessons from the retired champion, who kept quiet about her accomplishments. It wasn't until Cravens went to the library and did some pre-internet research that she discovered Hard's impressive career.

“She was gruff on the outside, but a real softy on the inside,” said Cravens, who became a close friend of Hard.

Cravens later offered Hard a job at USC, where she did everything from maintenance on the university's computer systems to design work on the El Rodeo yearbook and Daily Trojan newspaper.

“She had a very good eye for design,” Cravens said Friday. “She was very committed to whatever she did."

Hard is survived by her sister, Claire Brundage. She was briefly married and had no children.

___

More AP tennis: https://apnews.com/hub/tennis and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

Caption

FILE - Darlene Hard, of the U.S. team, reaches for a backhand shot in her Wightman Cup singles match against England's Ann Haydon at Wimbledon in London in June 1960. Hard, an aggressive serve-and-volley player who won three major singles titles as well as 18 major doubles titles in a Hall of Fame tennis career, died Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021, after a brief illness. She was 85. (AP Photo, File)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

FILE - Darlene Hard, of the U.S. team, reaches for a backhand shot in her Wightman Cup singles match against England's Ann Haydon at Wimbledon in London in June 1960. Hard, an aggressive serve-and-volley player who won three major singles titles as well as 18 major doubles titles in a Hall of Fame tennis career, died Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021, after a brief illness. She was 85. (AP Photo, File)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

FILE - Darlene Hard, left, of the United States, and partner Lesley Turner, of Australia, pose for photos after winning the women's U.S. Lawn Tennis Association women's doubles championship at Longwood Cricket Club in Brookline, Mass., Aug. 28, 1961. Hard, an aggressive serve-and-volley player who won three major singles titles as well as 18 major doubles titles in a Hall of Fame tennis career, died Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021, after a brief illness. She was 85. (AP Photo/Bill Chaplis, File)

Credit: Bill Chaplis

Caption

FILE - Darlene Hard, left, of the United States, and partner Lesley Turner, of Australia, pose for photos after winning the women's U.S. Lawn Tennis Association women's doubles championship at Longwood Cricket Club in Brookline, Mass., Aug. 28, 1961. Hard, an aggressive serve-and-volley player who won three major singles titles as well as 18 major doubles titles in a Hall of Fame tennis career, died Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021, after a brief illness. She was 85. (AP Photo/Bill Chaplis, File)

Credit: Bill Chaplis

Credit: Bill Chaplis

Dayton Daily News
Published 15 hours ago

Honor roll student wins Vax-2-School scholarship

Dec 04, 2021 7:00 AM

Cheryl Weaver of Fostoria has come into $10,000 of found money, and she's eager to spend it.
She won't be able to do it for quite a while and she won't be able to spend it on anything frivolous.
But that's fine with her. The 10-year-old Fostoria Elementary School fifth-grader aspires to be a math teacher, and that money will go toward her studies for that goal, courtesy of the state of Ohio.
Cheryl on Tuesday was one of 30 students whose names were drawn as a winner through the state's Vax-2-School lottery program. A total of 150 names of persons ages 5-25 who have gotten at least one dose of the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccinations were to be drawn through Friday as winners of $10,000 in scholarship funds. Five more names were announced Friday night, as well as grand-prize winners of a sum of $100,000.

Winners are to use the money, which is placed into accounts for them, to help fund their educations in colleges or trade schools located in Ohio.
A phone call on Tuesday afternoon with the news surprised Cheryl's grandmother, Joni Conley, who with husband Wayne are the legal guardians of Cheryl and her sister, Kairi, a 7-year-old second-grader.
"I forgot all about (the drawing)," Joni Conley said Thursday at her Fostoria home. "I probably wouldn't have even signed them up , except that night, after they got their vaccinations, I saw it on the news. I thought maybe I should just sign them up and I did, and then I forgot all about it."
Then her phone rang Tuesday afternoon.
"I thought it was a spam call, and at the last minute I answered it," she said. "I thought, 'Maybe I'd better answer this.' I can't remember his name; I lost it when he told me. I was like, 'What?'"
The purpose of the call hit even harder for Cheryl, who is well aware that attending college is not cheap.
"My grandma was like, 'Oh, my God,'" Cheryl said. "I was like, 'What?' She said, 'You won the $10,000 scholarship.' I was like, 'Roll back. What?' She said, 'I entered you into a drawing to get you a $10,000 scholarship.' She said my name got pulled and I was happy. ... I cried because I was really happy."
She was a celebrity of sorts Wednesday at school.
"I went to my classroom and my reading teacher said, 'You were on the news,'" Cheryl said. "I went to see another teacher and she said, 'Congratulations.' Then I was going through the lunch line and everybody in the lunch line said, 'Congratulations' to me. Then I was leaving and a whole bunch of people said, 'Congratulations' to me as well."
Cheryl, who made the first-quarter honor roll at Fostoria Elementary with all A's, said math is her favorite subject, which has led her to want to teach the subject. For now, she's aiming to attend Bowling Green State University, though she considers Tiffin University and the University of Findlay as possibilities. And she knows the $10,000, while certainly helpful, won't take care of her entire college education.
"She said, 'I've got to get more scholarships.'" Joni Conley said. "I said, 'Yes, you do.'"
There was still the possibility that she or her sister would be named as one of the grand-prize winners Friday night.
"(Cheryl) said, 'What if she gets $100,000? I only got $10,000. Can she share it with me?'" Conley said. "I cracked up."

Fostoria Review Times
Published 15 hours ago

Canton woman among grand prize winners for Vax-2-School amid COIVD surge

Titus Wu

Columbus Dispatch

A Canton woman was among the five grand prize winners for Ohio's Vax-2-School lottery.

The state announced the big winners Friday night, as well as the fifth and final round of winners of smaller scholarships.

The grand prizes, a $100,000 scholarship in return for getting vaccinated, went to:

Rinoa Chech, Canton

Jacob Peers, Convover

Avery Lagory, Cleves

Audrey Bird, Brecksville

Widnelson Miller, Delphos

Vax-2-School is an initiative by the Ohio Department of Health to increase COVID-19 vaccination rates among young people, especially with the shot recently being approved for use by those as young as 5 years old.

“This age group has the most room to grow in getting vaccinated and, with the delta variant in our midst, is the group we’re most concerned will miss in-classroom opportunities if they get or are exposed to COVID-19," Gov. Mike DeWine previously said.

As of Friday, only a quarter of Ohioans ages 19 and younger have received their first dose, per state data. The next-lowest rate is for those ages 20 to 29 at 52%. At the same time, the number of COVID cases continued to surge again on Friday, with Ohio recording 9,584 new or probable cases, 3,997 current hospitalizations and 264 new deaths. Since the start of the pandemic, 26,851 Ohioans have died.

Since the governor announced the Vax-2-School prizes on Sept. 23, the vaccination rate for first doses increased roughly from 33% to 40% for Ohioans ages 29 and younger, according to a USA Today Network Ohio Bureau review.

The fifth round of 30 people who have earned $10,000 scholarships in return for getting the COVID-19 shot included Andrew Putt of Massillon.

The program awarded a total of $2 million in prizes: 150 $10,000 scholarships and five $100,000 grand prize scholarships. Prize scholarships are awarded in Ohio 529 College Advantage plans and can be used at any Ohio college, technical or trade school or career program.

Health officials have said it is extremely important for young people to get vaccinated despite older adults being more at risk from serious illness. Some of the newer variants have had more of an effect on young Ohioans.

During the fall peak when the delta variant surged, for instance, Ohio children's hospitals penned a letter to the public, saying that they were seeing COVID-19 cases "more than ever before."

“What’s a little bit different now is that something of a silver lining a year ago … kids were getting infected but weren’t getting particularly sick,” Dr. Hector Wong, an ICU physician at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, had said then. “That’s changed now.”

The Canton Repository and Akron Beacon Journal contributed to this story.

Titus Wu is a reporter for the USA TODAY Network Ohio Bureau, which serves the Columbus Dispatch, Cincinnati Enquirer, Akron Beacon Journal and 18 other affiliated news organizations across Ohio.

Massillon Independent
Published 15 hours ago

Canton woman among grand prize winners for Vax-2-School amid COIVD surge

Titus Wu

Columbus Dispatch

A Canton woman was among the five grand prize winners for Ohio's Vax-2-School lottery.

The state announced the big winners Friday night, as well as the fifth and final round of winners of smaller scholarships.

The grand prizes, a $100,000 scholarship in return for getting vaccinated, went to:

Rinoa Chech, Canton

Jacob Peers, Convover

Avery Lagory, Cleves

Audrey Bird, Brecksville

Widnelson Miller, Delphos

Vax-2-School is an initiative by the Ohio Department of Health to increase COVID-19 vaccination rates among young people, especially with the shot recently being approved for use by those as young as 5 years old.

“This age group has the most room to grow in getting vaccinated and, with the delta variant in our midst, is the group we’re most concerned will miss in-classroom opportunities if they get or are exposed to COVID-19," Gov. Mike DeWine previously said.

As of Friday, only a quarter of Ohioans ages 19 and younger have received their first dose, per state data. The next-lowest rate is for those ages 20 to 29 at 52%. At the same time, the number of COVID cases continued to surge again on Friday, with Ohio recording 9,584 new or probable cases, 3,997 current hospitalizations and 264 new deaths. Since the start of the pandemic, 26,851 Ohioans have died.

Since the governor announced the Vax-2-School prizes on Sept. 23, the vaccination rate for first doses increased roughly from 33% to 40% for Ohioans ages 29 and younger, according to a USA Today Network Ohio Bureau review.

The fifth round of 30 people who have earned $10,000 scholarships in return for getting the COVID-19 shot included Andrew Putt of Massillon.

The program awarded a total of $2 million in prizes: 150 $10,000 scholarships and five $100,000 grand prize scholarships. Prize scholarships are awarded in Ohio 529 College Advantage plans and can be used at any Ohio college, technical or trade school or career program.

Health officials have said it is extremely important for young people to get vaccinated despite older adults being more at risk from serious illness. Some of the newer variants have had more of an effect on young Ohioans.

During the fall peak when the delta variant surged, for instance, Ohio children's hospitals penned a letter to the public, saying that they were seeing COVID-19 cases "more than ever before."

“What’s a little bit different now is that something of a silver lining a year ago … kids were getting infected but weren’t getting particularly sick,” Dr. Hector Wong, an ICU physician at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, had said then. “That’s changed now.”

The Canton Repository and Akron Beacon Journal contributed to this story.

Titus Wu is a reporter for the USA TODAY Network Ohio Bureau, which serves the Columbus Dispatch, Cincinnati Enquirer, Akron Beacon Journal and 18 other affiliated news organizations across Ohio.

Canton Repository
Published 15 hours ago