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Parents of accused killer in Michigan school shooting arrested after vehicle was found in Detroit

DETROIT — James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teen charged in the Oxford High School shooting were located and arrested early Saturday in Detroit, a little more than two hours after a citizen saw their vehicle and called police.

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since about noon Friday after they were charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting deaths at the high school in Michigan. Their son, Ethan Crumbley, 15, is accused of fatally shooting four students and injuring seven others at the suburban Detroit high school on Tuesday.

The Crumbley parents did not show for their arraignment Friday afternoon in Rochester Hills, Michigan. The U.S. Marshals Service issued "Wanted" posters and offered a reward for information leading to their arrests.

The investigation of the shootings and the search for the Crumbleys was led by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe said the vehicle was found around 11:30 p.m. Friday.

"The owner of the building arrived and saw the car in the back parking lot, knew it didn’t belong there, went to investigate," McCabe told the Detroit Free Press, part of the USA TODAY Network.

The building's owner immediately recognized the car from information put out by law enforcement, checked the license plate, which matched, and called 911.

By about 1:45 a.m., the Crumbleys were under arrest. The couple was found hiding inside a commercial building and were "distressed," Detroit Police Chief James White told reporters. They were unarmed, he added.

White said police believe someone had let the Crumbleys into the building. He said those who aided the couple could face criminal charges.

Jennifer and James Crumbley were each charged with involuntary manslaughter after Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald said they bought the firearm for their son as a Christmas gift.

During a hearing that started around noon, a lieutenant with the Oakland County Sheriff's Office said the parents were not in custody. The Oakland County Fugitive Team, along with several agencies, were searching for the couple as of Friday evening.

"The action of fleeing and ignoring their attorney certainly adds weight to the charges," Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a release Friday. "They cannot run from their part in this tragedy."

But the family's lawyers said the couple was not fleeing from authorities and were returning to the area after having left town briefly amid the commotion surrounding tragedy.

"The Crumbleys left town on the night of the tragic shooting for their own safety. They are returning to the area to be arraigned," their lawyers Smith and Mariell Lehman said.

The gun had been stored in an unlocked drawer in their house, and Crumbley's parents did not ask where it was when they were called to the school the day of the shooting for a disturbing drawing their son made of a firearm, McDonald said at a news conference Friday.

Ethan Crumbley had posted about the firearm online and researched ammunition while at school, McDonald said the investigation revealed. He was also allowed to return to class on the day of the shooting after the meeting with his parents, she said.

"The facts of this case are so egregious," McDonald said.

Charges for parents of shooter rare, experts say:Michigan school shooting is 'so egregious,' the suspect's parents are charged.

Michigan school shooting suspect faces life in prison: What murder, terrorism charges mean

Crumbley was charged Wednesday as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes in what investigators described as a methodical and deliberate massacre.

When asked whether her office was looking into charges for any school officials, McDonald said the investigation was ongoing.

"While the shooter was the one who entered the high school and pulled the trigger, there are other individuals who contributed to the events on Nov. 30, and it's my intention to hold them accountable as well," she said.

Here's what we know:

Prosecutor: Gun was 'Christmas present'

At a news conference Friday, McDonald laid out how Ethan Crumbley got the weapon other warning signs in the days leading up to the shooting.

McDonald said Ethan Crumbley was there when his father bought the 9mm Sig Sauer SP 2022 on Nov. 26. The same day, the younger Crumbley posted photos of the weapon online, calling it his "new beauty." His mom said in a post the following day, "Mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," McDonald said.

"Clearly based on the statements of the shooter (and) the statements of mom, that was his gun," McDonald said.

Prosecutor: School officials knew shooting suspect searched online for ammo, made drawings

Suspect's drawing prompted worries on day of shooting

The 15-year-old suspect was also caught looking up ammunition online while at school before the shooting. McDonald said school officials contacted his mother about the online search, leaving a voicemail and email, but received no response. Crumbley's mother instead texted him the same day, "LOL I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," McDonald said.

Hours before the shooting, Crumbley was found with a disturbing drawing that included a a firearm and someone who appeared to be bleeding, McDonald said.

A teacher took a photo of the drawing, and Crumbley's parents were immediately contacted. When the drawing was brought to a school counselor with Crumbley and his parents present, Crumbley had altered it, McDonald said.

A counselor told the parents their son needed to get counseling, but Crumbley was able to return to class. His parents did not ask him about the firearm at that time nor did they search his backpack, McDonald said.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom," McDonald added.

After reports of the shooting at the school, Jennifer Crumbley texted her son, "Ethan don't do it," McDonald said. James Crumbley drove home to search for the firearm and called 911 to report it missing, saying he believed his son was the shooter, McDonald said.

"I'm angry as a mother. I'm angry as the prosecutor. I'm angry as a person that lives in this county. I'm angry. There were a lot of things that could have been so simple to prevent," McDonald said.

Slew of copycat threats across metro Detroit trouble schools, parents

Copycat threats circulated on social media and districts canceled classes Thursday out of caution for students' safety.

A 17-year-old student in Southfield, about 30 miles from Oxford High School, was arrested Thursday with a semi-automatic pistol. A bomb threat was also made at South Lake High School, about 45 miles from Oxford, and prompted a police investigation.

“If you’re making threats, we’re going to find you,” Bouchard said during a news conference Thursday that was specifically called to address the estimated hundreds of copycat threats reported. “It is ridiculous you’re inflaming the fears and passion of parents, teachers, and the community in the midst of a real tragedy.”

The FBI and Secret Service are also investigating threats.

People who make false threats could face charges for false threat of terrorism, which is a 20-year felony, and misdemeanor malicious use of a telephone, McDonald said.

Meanwhile, parents are walking a fine line of ensuring their children's security without affecting their kids' mental and emotional health.

"I felt like I was going to throw up," said Jill Dillon, 51, recalling dropping off her 14-year-old son to school Wednesday morning. "It was nauseating, thinking that I'm supposed to be taking him someplace safe, and is he really going to be safe?"

David Roden, a 14-year-old freshman at Northville High School, which stayed open Thursday, said the confusion of what's real and what's not was the scariest part.

"Everyone was on edge. It's just kind of weird, being close to the situation," he said.

— Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press

Fake Instagram accounts multiply

Fake social media accounts claiming to be the 15-year-old charged in the Oxford High School shooting began popping up even before his name was released by law enforcement, and some made threats about additional shootings and plans for revenge.

While direct threats may lead to criminal charges, the spread of false information via deceiving accounts is a common problem in the wake of mass shootings, often is not illegal and sometimes does not violate social media platforms’ terms of service.

“Unfortunately, poor taste is not against the law,” said Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police.

It is unlikely any social media accounts that chronicled Crumbley’s alleged criminal activity remain active on these platforms, said Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan's School of Information.

In active threat situations, the social media accounts of alleged perpetrators are taken down through an opaque process, Lampe said. Platforms are alerted either by their own algorithms or by law enforcement.

The tendency of social media platforms to make some user accounts “disappear in the night” can help feed the creation of these fake accounts, Lampe said. However, the common practice of setting up “sock puppets” online would happen regardless, he said.

— Ashley Nerbovig, Detroit Free Press

Contributing: Darcie Moran, Tyler J. Davis, Phoebe Wall Howard, Elisha Anderson, Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press; Christine Fernando, USA TODAY; The Associated Press

Coshocton Tribune
Published 14 hours ago

Parents of accused killer in Michigan school shooting arrested after vehicle was found in Detroit

DETROIT — James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teen charged in the Oxford High School shooting were located and arrested early Saturday in Detroit, a little more than two hours after a citizen saw their vehicle and called police.

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since about noon Friday after they were charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting deaths at the high school in Michigan. Their son, Ethan Crumbley, 15, is accused of fatally shooting four students and injuring seven others at the suburban Detroit high school on Tuesday.

The Crumbley parents did not show for their arraignment Friday afternoon in Rochester Hills, Michigan. The U.S. Marshals Service issued "Wanted" posters and offered a reward for information leading to their arrests.

The investigation of the shootings and the search for the Crumbleys was led by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe said the vehicle was found around 11:30 p.m. Friday.

"The owner of the building arrived and saw the car in the back parking lot, knew it didn’t belong there, went to investigate," McCabe told the Detroit Free Press, part of the USA TODAY Network.

The building's owner immediately recognized the car from information put out by law enforcement, checked the license plate, which matched, and called 911.

By about 1:45 a.m., the Crumbleys were under arrest. The couple was found hiding inside a commercial building and were "distressed," Detroit Police Chief James White told reporters. They were unarmed, he added.

White said police believe someone had let the Crumbleys into the building. He said those who aided the couple could face criminal charges.

Jennifer and James Crumbley were each charged with involuntary manslaughter after Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald said they bought the firearm for their son as a Christmas gift.

During a hearing that started around noon, a lieutenant with the Oakland County Sheriff's Office said the parents were not in custody. The Oakland County Fugitive Team, along with several agencies, were searching for the couple as of Friday evening.

"The action of fleeing and ignoring their attorney certainly adds weight to the charges," Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a release Friday. "They cannot run from their part in this tragedy."

But the family's lawyers said the couple was not fleeing from authorities and were returning to the area after having left town briefly amid the commotion surrounding tragedy.

"The Crumbleys left town on the night of the tragic shooting for their own safety. They are returning to the area to be arraigned," their lawyers Smith and Mariell Lehman said.

The gun had been stored in an unlocked drawer in their house, and Crumbley's parents did not ask where it was when they were called to the school the day of the shooting for a disturbing drawing their son made of a firearm, McDonald said at a news conference Friday.

Ethan Crumbley had posted about the firearm online and researched ammunition while at school, McDonald said the investigation revealed. He was also allowed to return to class on the day of the shooting after the meeting with his parents, she said.

"The facts of this case are so egregious," McDonald said.

Charges for parents of shooter rare, experts say:Michigan school shooting is 'so egregious,' the suspect's parents are charged.

Michigan school shooting suspect faces life in prison: What murder, terrorism charges mean

Crumbley was charged Wednesday as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes in what investigators described as a methodical and deliberate massacre.

When asked whether her office was looking into charges for any school officials, McDonald said the investigation was ongoing.

"While the shooter was the one who entered the high school and pulled the trigger, there are other individuals who contributed to the events on Nov. 30, and it's my intention to hold them accountable as well," she said.

Here's what we know:

Prosecutor: Gun was 'Christmas present'

At a news conference Friday, McDonald laid out how Ethan Crumbley got the weapon other warning signs in the days leading up to the shooting.

McDonald said Ethan Crumbley was there when his father bought the 9mm Sig Sauer SP 2022 on Nov. 26. The same day, the younger Crumbley posted photos of the weapon online, calling it his "new beauty." His mom said in a post the following day, "Mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," McDonald said.

"Clearly based on the statements of the shooter (and) the statements of mom, that was his gun," McDonald said.

Prosecutor: School officials knew shooting suspect searched online for ammo, made drawings

Suspect's drawing prompted worries on day of shooting

The 15-year-old suspect was also caught looking up ammunition online while at school before the shooting. McDonald said school officials contacted his mother about the online search, leaving a voicemail and email, but received no response. Crumbley's mother instead texted him the same day, "LOL I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," McDonald said.

Hours before the shooting, Crumbley was found with a disturbing drawing that included a a firearm and someone who appeared to be bleeding, McDonald said.

A teacher took a photo of the drawing, and Crumbley's parents were immediately contacted. When the drawing was brought to a school counselor with Crumbley and his parents present, Crumbley had altered it, McDonald said.

A counselor told the parents their son needed to get counseling, but Crumbley was able to return to class. His parents did not ask him about the firearm at that time nor did they search his backpack, McDonald said.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom," McDonald added.

After reports of the shooting at the school, Jennifer Crumbley texted her son, "Ethan don't do it," McDonald said. James Crumbley drove home to search for the firearm and called 911 to report it missing, saying he believed his son was the shooter, McDonald said.

"I'm angry as a mother. I'm angry as the prosecutor. I'm angry as a person that lives in this county. I'm angry. There were a lot of things that could have been so simple to prevent," McDonald said.

Slew of copycat threats across metro Detroit trouble schools, parents

Copycat threats circulated on social media and districts canceled classes Thursday out of caution for students' safety.

A 17-year-old student in Southfield, about 30 miles from Oxford High School, was arrested Thursday with a semi-automatic pistol. A bomb threat was also made at South Lake High School, about 45 miles from Oxford, and prompted a police investigation.

“If you’re making threats, we’re going to find you,” Bouchard said during a news conference Thursday that was specifically called to address the estimated hundreds of copycat threats reported. “It is ridiculous you’re inflaming the fears and passion of parents, teachers, and the community in the midst of a real tragedy.”

The FBI and Secret Service are also investigating threats.

People who make false threats could face charges for false threat of terrorism, which is a 20-year felony, and misdemeanor malicious use of a telephone, McDonald said.

Meanwhile, parents are walking a fine line of ensuring their children's security without affecting their kids' mental and emotional health.

"I felt like I was going to throw up," said Jill Dillon, 51, recalling dropping off her 14-year-old son to school Wednesday morning. "It was nauseating, thinking that I'm supposed to be taking him someplace safe, and is he really going to be safe?"

David Roden, a 14-year-old freshman at Northville High School, which stayed open Thursday, said the confusion of what's real and what's not was the scariest part.

"Everyone was on edge. It's just kind of weird, being close to the situation," he said.

— Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press

Fake Instagram accounts multiply

Fake social media accounts claiming to be the 15-year-old charged in the Oxford High School shooting began popping up even before his name was released by law enforcement, and some made threats about additional shootings and plans for revenge.

While direct threats may lead to criminal charges, the spread of false information via deceiving accounts is a common problem in the wake of mass shootings, often is not illegal and sometimes does not violate social media platforms’ terms of service.

“Unfortunately, poor taste is not against the law,” said Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police.

It is unlikely any social media accounts that chronicled Crumbley’s alleged criminal activity remain active on these platforms, said Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan's School of Information.

In active threat situations, the social media accounts of alleged perpetrators are taken down through an opaque process, Lampe said. Platforms are alerted either by their own algorithms or by law enforcement.

The tendency of social media platforms to make some user accounts “disappear in the night” can help feed the creation of these fake accounts, Lampe said. However, the common practice of setting up “sock puppets” online would happen regardless, he said.

— Ashley Nerbovig, Detroit Free Press

Contributing: Darcie Moran, Tyler J. Davis, Phoebe Wall Howard, Elisha Anderson, Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press; Christine Fernando, USA TODAY; The Associated Press

Marion Star
Published 14 hours ago

Parents of accused killer in Michigan school shooting arrested after vehicle was found in Detroit

DETROIT — James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teen charged in the Oxford High School shooting were located and arrested early Saturday in Detroit, a little more than two hours after a citizen saw their vehicle and called police.

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since about noon Friday after they were charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting deaths at the high school in Michigan. Their son, Ethan Crumbley, 15, is accused of fatally shooting four students and injuring seven others at the suburban Detroit high school on Tuesday.

The Crumbley parents did not show for their arraignment Friday afternoon in Rochester Hills, Michigan. The U.S. Marshals Service issued "Wanted" posters and offered a reward for information leading to their arrests.

The investigation of the shootings and the search for the Crumbleys was led by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe said the vehicle was found around 11:30 p.m. Friday.

"The owner of the building arrived and saw the car in the back parking lot, knew it didn’t belong there, went to investigate," McCabe told the Detroit Free Press, part of the USA TODAY Network.

The building's owner immediately recognized the car from information put out by law enforcement, checked the license plate, which matched, and called 911.

By about 1:45 a.m., the Crumbleys were under arrest. The couple was found hiding inside a commercial building and were "distressed," Detroit Police Chief James White told reporters. They were unarmed, he added.

White said police believe someone had let the Crumbleys into the building. He said those who aided the couple could face criminal charges.

Jennifer and James Crumbley were each charged with involuntary manslaughter after Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald said they bought the firearm for their son as a Christmas gift.

During a hearing that started around noon, a lieutenant with the Oakland County Sheriff's Office said the parents were not in custody. The Oakland County Fugitive Team, along with several agencies, were searching for the couple as of Friday evening.

"The action of fleeing and ignoring their attorney certainly adds weight to the charges," Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a release Friday. "They cannot run from their part in this tragedy."

But the family's lawyers said the couple was not fleeing from authorities and were returning to the area after having left town briefly amid the commotion surrounding tragedy.

"The Crumbleys left town on the night of the tragic shooting for their own safety. They are returning to the area to be arraigned," their lawyers Smith and Mariell Lehman said.

The gun had been stored in an unlocked drawer in their house, and Crumbley's parents did not ask where it was when they were called to the school the day of the shooting for a disturbing drawing their son made of a firearm, McDonald said at a news conference Friday.

Ethan Crumbley had posted about the firearm online and researched ammunition while at school, McDonald said the investigation revealed. He was also allowed to return to class on the day of the shooting after the meeting with his parents, she said.

"The facts of this case are so egregious," McDonald said.

Charges for parents of shooter rare, experts say:Michigan school shooting is 'so egregious,' the suspect's parents are charged.

Michigan school shooting suspect faces life in prison: What murder, terrorism charges mean

Crumbley was charged Wednesday as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes in what investigators described as a methodical and deliberate massacre.

When asked whether her office was looking into charges for any school officials, McDonald said the investigation was ongoing.

"While the shooter was the one who entered the high school and pulled the trigger, there are other individuals who contributed to the events on Nov. 30, and it's my intention to hold them accountable as well," she said.

Here's what we know:

Prosecutor: Gun was 'Christmas present'

At a news conference Friday, McDonald laid out how Ethan Crumbley got the weapon other warning signs in the days leading up to the shooting.

McDonald said Ethan Crumbley was there when his father bought the 9mm Sig Sauer SP 2022 on Nov. 26. The same day, the younger Crumbley posted photos of the weapon online, calling it his "new beauty." His mom said in a post the following day, "Mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," McDonald said.

"Clearly based on the statements of the shooter (and) the statements of mom, that was his gun," McDonald said.

Prosecutor: School officials knew shooting suspect searched online for ammo, made drawings

Suspect's drawing prompted worries on day of shooting

The 15-year-old suspect was also caught looking up ammunition online while at school before the shooting. McDonald said school officials contacted his mother about the online search, leaving a voicemail and email, but received no response. Crumbley's mother instead texted him the same day, "LOL I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," McDonald said.

Hours before the shooting, Crumbley was found with a disturbing drawing that included a a firearm and someone who appeared to be bleeding, McDonald said.

A teacher took a photo of the drawing, and Crumbley's parents were immediately contacted. When the drawing was brought to a school counselor with Crumbley and his parents present, Crumbley had altered it, McDonald said.

A counselor told the parents their son needed to get counseling, but Crumbley was able to return to class. His parents did not ask him about the firearm at that time nor did they search his backpack, McDonald said.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom," McDonald added.

After reports of the shooting at the school, Jennifer Crumbley texted her son, "Ethan don't do it," McDonald said. James Crumbley drove home to search for the firearm and called 911 to report it missing, saying he believed his son was the shooter, McDonald said.

"I'm angry as a mother. I'm angry as the prosecutor. I'm angry as a person that lives in this county. I'm angry. There were a lot of things that could have been so simple to prevent," McDonald said.

Slew of copycat threats across metro Detroit trouble schools, parents

Copycat threats circulated on social media and districts canceled classes Thursday out of caution for students' safety.

A 17-year-old student in Southfield, about 30 miles from Oxford High School, was arrested Thursday with a semi-automatic pistol. A bomb threat was also made at South Lake High School, about 45 miles from Oxford, and prompted a police investigation.

“If you’re making threats, we’re going to find you,” Bouchard said during a news conference Thursday that was specifically called to address the estimated hundreds of copycat threats reported. “It is ridiculous you’re inflaming the fears and passion of parents, teachers, and the community in the midst of a real tragedy.”

The FBI and Secret Service are also investigating threats.

People who make false threats could face charges for false threat of terrorism, which is a 20-year felony, and misdemeanor malicious use of a telephone, McDonald said.

Meanwhile, parents are walking a fine line of ensuring their children's security without affecting their kids' mental and emotional health.

"I felt like I was going to throw up," said Jill Dillon, 51, recalling dropping off her 14-year-old son to school Wednesday morning. "It was nauseating, thinking that I'm supposed to be taking him someplace safe, and is he really going to be safe?"

David Roden, a 14-year-old freshman at Northville High School, which stayed open Thursday, said the confusion of what's real and what's not was the scariest part.

"Everyone was on edge. It's just kind of weird, being close to the situation," he said.

— Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press

Fake Instagram accounts multiply

Fake social media accounts claiming to be the 15-year-old charged in the Oxford High School shooting began popping up even before his name was released by law enforcement, and some made threats about additional shootings and plans for revenge.

While direct threats may lead to criminal charges, the spread of false information via deceiving accounts is a common problem in the wake of mass shootings, often is not illegal and sometimes does not violate social media platforms’ terms of service.

“Unfortunately, poor taste is not against the law,” said Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police.

It is unlikely any social media accounts that chronicled Crumbley’s alleged criminal activity remain active on these platforms, said Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan's School of Information.

In active threat situations, the social media accounts of alleged perpetrators are taken down through an opaque process, Lampe said. Platforms are alerted either by their own algorithms or by law enforcement.

The tendency of social media platforms to make some user accounts “disappear in the night” can help feed the creation of these fake accounts, Lampe said. However, the common practice of setting up “sock puppets” online would happen regardless, he said.

— Ashley Nerbovig, Detroit Free Press

Contributing: Darcie Moran, Tyler J. Davis, Phoebe Wall Howard, Elisha Anderson, Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press; Christine Fernando, USA TODAY; The Associated Press

Ravenna Record Courier
Published 14 hours ago

Parents of accused killer in Michigan school shooting arrested after vehicle was found in Detroit

DETROIT — James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teen charged in the Oxford High School shooting were located and arrested early Saturday in Detroit, a little more than two hours after a citizen saw their vehicle and called police.

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since about noon Friday after they were charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting deaths at the high school in Michigan. Their son, Ethan Crumbley, 15, is accused of fatally shooting four students and injuring seven others at the suburban Detroit high school on Tuesday.

The Crumbley parents did not show for their arraignment Friday afternoon in Rochester Hills, Michigan. The U.S. Marshals Service issued "Wanted" posters and offered a reward for information leading to their arrests.

The investigation of the shootings and the search for the Crumbleys was led by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe said the vehicle was found around 11:30 p.m. Friday.

"The owner of the building arrived and saw the car in the back parking lot, knew it didn’t belong there, went to investigate," McCabe told the Detroit Free Press, part of the USA TODAY Network.

The building's owner immediately recognized the car from information put out by law enforcement, checked the license plate, which matched, and called 911.

By about 1:45 a.m., the Crumbleys were under arrest. The couple was found hiding inside a commercial building and were "distressed," Detroit Police Chief James White told reporters. They were unarmed, he added.

White said police believe someone had let the Crumbleys into the building. He said those who aided the couple could face criminal charges.

Jennifer and James Crumbley were each charged with involuntary manslaughter after Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald said they bought the firearm for their son as a Christmas gift.

During a hearing that started around noon, a lieutenant with the Oakland County Sheriff's Office said the parents were not in custody. The Oakland County Fugitive Team, along with several agencies, were searching for the couple as of Friday evening.

"The action of fleeing and ignoring their attorney certainly adds weight to the charges," Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a release Friday. "They cannot run from their part in this tragedy."

But the family's lawyers said the couple was not fleeing from authorities and were returning to the area after having left town briefly amid the commotion surrounding tragedy.

"The Crumbleys left town on the night of the tragic shooting for their own safety. They are returning to the area to be arraigned," their lawyers Smith and Mariell Lehman said.

The gun had been stored in an unlocked drawer in their house, and Crumbley's parents did not ask where it was when they were called to the school the day of the shooting for a disturbing drawing their son made of a firearm, McDonald said at a news conference Friday.

Ethan Crumbley had posted about the firearm online and researched ammunition while at school, McDonald said the investigation revealed. He was also allowed to return to class on the day of the shooting after the meeting with his parents, she said.

"The facts of this case are so egregious," McDonald said.

Charges for parents of shooter rare, experts say:Michigan school shooting is 'so egregious,' the suspect's parents are charged.

Michigan school shooting suspect faces life in prison: What murder, terrorism charges mean

Crumbley was charged Wednesday as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes in what investigators described as a methodical and deliberate massacre.

When asked whether her office was looking into charges for any school officials, McDonald said the investigation was ongoing.

"While the shooter was the one who entered the high school and pulled the trigger, there are other individuals who contributed to the events on Nov. 30, and it's my intention to hold them accountable as well," she said.

Here's what we know:

Prosecutor: Gun was 'Christmas present'

At a news conference Friday, McDonald laid out how Ethan Crumbley got the weapon other warning signs in the days leading up to the shooting.

McDonald said Ethan Crumbley was there when his father bought the 9mm Sig Sauer SP 2022 on Nov. 26. The same day, the younger Crumbley posted photos of the weapon online, calling it his "new beauty." His mom said in a post the following day, "Mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," McDonald said.

"Clearly based on the statements of the shooter (and) the statements of mom, that was his gun," McDonald said.

Prosecutor: School officials knew shooting suspect searched online for ammo, made drawings

Suspect's drawing prompted worries on day of shooting

The 15-year-old suspect was also caught looking up ammunition online while at school before the shooting. McDonald said school officials contacted his mother about the online search, leaving a voicemail and email, but received no response. Crumbley's mother instead texted him the same day, "LOL I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," McDonald said.

Hours before the shooting, Crumbley was found with a disturbing drawing that included a a firearm and someone who appeared to be bleeding, McDonald said.

A teacher took a photo of the drawing, and Crumbley's parents were immediately contacted. When the drawing was brought to a school counselor with Crumbley and his parents present, Crumbley had altered it, McDonald said.

A counselor told the parents their son needed to get counseling, but Crumbley was able to return to class. His parents did not ask him about the firearm at that time nor did they search his backpack, McDonald said.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom," McDonald added.

After reports of the shooting at the school, Jennifer Crumbley texted her son, "Ethan don't do it," McDonald said. James Crumbley drove home to search for the firearm and called 911 to report it missing, saying he believed his son was the shooter, McDonald said.

"I'm angry as a mother. I'm angry as the prosecutor. I'm angry as a person that lives in this county. I'm angry. There were a lot of things that could have been so simple to prevent," McDonald said.

Slew of copycat threats across metro Detroit trouble schools, parents

Copycat threats circulated on social media and districts canceled classes Thursday out of caution for students' safety.

A 17-year-old student in Southfield, about 30 miles from Oxford High School, was arrested Thursday with a semi-automatic pistol. A bomb threat was also made at South Lake High School, about 45 miles from Oxford, and prompted a police investigation.

“If you’re making threats, we’re going to find you,” Bouchard said during a news conference Thursday that was specifically called to address the estimated hundreds of copycat threats reported. “It is ridiculous you’re inflaming the fears and passion of parents, teachers, and the community in the midst of a real tragedy.”

The FBI and Secret Service are also investigating threats.

People who make false threats could face charges for false threat of terrorism, which is a 20-year felony, and misdemeanor malicious use of a telephone, McDonald said.

Meanwhile, parents are walking a fine line of ensuring their children's security without affecting their kids' mental and emotional health.

"I felt like I was going to throw up," said Jill Dillon, 51, recalling dropping off her 14-year-old son to school Wednesday morning. "It was nauseating, thinking that I'm supposed to be taking him someplace safe, and is he really going to be safe?"

David Roden, a 14-year-old freshman at Northville High School, which stayed open Thursday, said the confusion of what's real and what's not was the scariest part.

"Everyone was on edge. It's just kind of weird, being close to the situation," he said.

— Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press

Fake Instagram accounts multiply

Fake social media accounts claiming to be the 15-year-old charged in the Oxford High School shooting began popping up even before his name was released by law enforcement, and some made threats about additional shootings and plans for revenge.

While direct threats may lead to criminal charges, the spread of false information via deceiving accounts is a common problem in the wake of mass shootings, often is not illegal and sometimes does not violate social media platforms’ terms of service.

“Unfortunately, poor taste is not against the law,” said Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police.

It is unlikely any social media accounts that chronicled Crumbley’s alleged criminal activity remain active on these platforms, said Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan's School of Information.

In active threat situations, the social media accounts of alleged perpetrators are taken down through an opaque process, Lampe said. Platforms are alerted either by their own algorithms or by law enforcement.

The tendency of social media platforms to make some user accounts “disappear in the night” can help feed the creation of these fake accounts, Lampe said. However, the common practice of setting up “sock puppets” online would happen regardless, he said.

— Ashley Nerbovig, Detroit Free Press

Contributing: Darcie Moran, Tyler J. Davis, Phoebe Wall Howard, Elisha Anderson, Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press; Christine Fernando, USA TODAY; The Associated Press

Newark Advocate
Published 14 hours ago

Parents of accused killer in Michigan school shooting arrested after vehicle was found in Detroit

DETROIT — James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teen charged in the Oxford High School shooting were located and arrested early Saturday in Detroit, a little more than two hours after a citizen saw their vehicle and called police.

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since about noon Friday after they were charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting deaths at the high school in Michigan. Their son, Ethan Crumbley, 15, is accused of fatally shooting four students and injuring seven others at the suburban Detroit high school on Tuesday.

The Crumbley parents did not show for their arraignment Friday afternoon in Rochester Hills, Michigan. The U.S. Marshals Service issued "Wanted" posters and offered a reward for information leading to their arrests.

The investigation of the shootings and the search for the Crumbleys was led by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe said the vehicle was found around 11:30 p.m. Friday.

"The owner of the building arrived and saw the car in the back parking lot, knew it didn’t belong there, went to investigate," McCabe told the Detroit Free Press, part of the USA TODAY Network.

The building's owner immediately recognized the car from information put out by law enforcement, checked the license plate, which matched, and called 911.

By about 1:45 a.m., the Crumbleys were under arrest. The couple was found hiding inside a commercial building and were "distressed," Detroit Police Chief James White told reporters. They were unarmed, he added.

White said police believe someone had let the Crumbleys into the building. He said those who aided the couple could face criminal charges.

Jennifer and James Crumbley were each charged with involuntary manslaughter after Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald said they bought the firearm for their son as a Christmas gift.

During a hearing that started around noon, a lieutenant with the Oakland County Sheriff's Office said the parents were not in custody. The Oakland County Fugitive Team, along with several agencies, were searching for the couple as of Friday evening.

"The action of fleeing and ignoring their attorney certainly adds weight to the charges," Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a release Friday. "They cannot run from their part in this tragedy."

But the family's lawyers said the couple was not fleeing from authorities and were returning to the area after having left town briefly amid the commotion surrounding tragedy.

"The Crumbleys left town on the night of the tragic shooting for their own safety. They are returning to the area to be arraigned," their lawyers Smith and Mariell Lehman said.

The gun had been stored in an unlocked drawer in their house, and Crumbley's parents did not ask where it was when they were called to the school the day of the shooting for a disturbing drawing their son made of a firearm, McDonald said at a news conference Friday.

Ethan Crumbley had posted about the firearm online and researched ammunition while at school, McDonald said the investigation revealed. He was also allowed to return to class on the day of the shooting after the meeting with his parents, she said.

"The facts of this case are so egregious," McDonald said.

Charges for parents of shooter rare, experts say:Michigan school shooting is 'so egregious,' the suspect's parents are charged.

Michigan school shooting suspect faces life in prison: What murder, terrorism charges mean

Crumbley was charged Wednesday as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes in what investigators described as a methodical and deliberate massacre.

When asked whether her office was looking into charges for any school officials, McDonald said the investigation was ongoing.

"While the shooter was the one who entered the high school and pulled the trigger, there are other individuals who contributed to the events on Nov. 30, and it's my intention to hold them accountable as well," she said.

Here's what we know:

Prosecutor: Gun was 'Christmas present'

At a news conference Friday, McDonald laid out how Ethan Crumbley got the weapon other warning signs in the days leading up to the shooting.

McDonald said Ethan Crumbley was there when his father bought the 9mm Sig Sauer SP 2022 on Nov. 26. The same day, the younger Crumbley posted photos of the weapon online, calling it his "new beauty." His mom said in a post the following day, "Mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," McDonald said.

"Clearly based on the statements of the shooter (and) the statements of mom, that was his gun," McDonald said.

Prosecutor: School officials knew shooting suspect searched online for ammo, made drawings

Suspect's drawing prompted worries on day of shooting

The 15-year-old suspect was also caught looking up ammunition online while at school before the shooting. McDonald said school officials contacted his mother about the online search, leaving a voicemail and email, but received no response. Crumbley's mother instead texted him the same day, "LOL I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," McDonald said.

Hours before the shooting, Crumbley was found with a disturbing drawing that included a a firearm and someone who appeared to be bleeding, McDonald said.

A teacher took a photo of the drawing, and Crumbley's parents were immediately contacted. When the drawing was brought to a school counselor with Crumbley and his parents present, Crumbley had altered it, McDonald said.

A counselor told the parents their son needed to get counseling, but Crumbley was able to return to class. His parents did not ask him about the firearm at that time nor did they search his backpack, McDonald said.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom," McDonald added.

After reports of the shooting at the school, Jennifer Crumbley texted her son, "Ethan don't do it," McDonald said. James Crumbley drove home to search for the firearm and called 911 to report it missing, saying he believed his son was the shooter, McDonald said.

"I'm angry as a mother. I'm angry as the prosecutor. I'm angry as a person that lives in this county. I'm angry. There were a lot of things that could have been so simple to prevent," McDonald said.

Slew of copycat threats across metro Detroit trouble schools, parents

Copycat threats circulated on social media and districts canceled classes Thursday out of caution for students' safety.

A 17-year-old student in Southfield, about 30 miles from Oxford High School, was arrested Thursday with a semi-automatic pistol. A bomb threat was also made at South Lake High School, about 45 miles from Oxford, and prompted a police investigation.

“If you’re making threats, we’re going to find you,” Bouchard said during a news conference Thursday that was specifically called to address the estimated hundreds of copycat threats reported. “It is ridiculous you’re inflaming the fears and passion of parents, teachers, and the community in the midst of a real tragedy.”

The FBI and Secret Service are also investigating threats.

People who make false threats could face charges for false threat of terrorism, which is a 20-year felony, and misdemeanor malicious use of a telephone, McDonald said.

Meanwhile, parents are walking a fine line of ensuring their children's security without affecting their kids' mental and emotional health.

"I felt like I was going to throw up," said Jill Dillon, 51, recalling dropping off her 14-year-old son to school Wednesday morning. "It was nauseating, thinking that I'm supposed to be taking him someplace safe, and is he really going to be safe?"

David Roden, a 14-year-old freshman at Northville High School, which stayed open Thursday, said the confusion of what's real and what's not was the scariest part.

"Everyone was on edge. It's just kind of weird, being close to the situation," he said.

— Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press

Fake Instagram accounts multiply

Fake social media accounts claiming to be the 15-year-old charged in the Oxford High School shooting began popping up even before his name was released by law enforcement, and some made threats about additional shootings and plans for revenge.

While direct threats may lead to criminal charges, the spread of false information via deceiving accounts is a common problem in the wake of mass shootings, often is not illegal and sometimes does not violate social media platforms’ terms of service.

“Unfortunately, poor taste is not against the law,” said Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police.

It is unlikely any social media accounts that chronicled Crumbley’s alleged criminal activity remain active on these platforms, said Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan's School of Information.

In active threat situations, the social media accounts of alleged perpetrators are taken down through an opaque process, Lampe said. Platforms are alerted either by their own algorithms or by law enforcement.

The tendency of social media platforms to make some user accounts “disappear in the night” can help feed the creation of these fake accounts, Lampe said. However, the common practice of setting up “sock puppets” online would happen regardless, he said.

— Ashley Nerbovig, Detroit Free Press

Contributing: Darcie Moran, Tyler J. Davis, Phoebe Wall Howard, Elisha Anderson, Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press; Christine Fernando, USA TODAY; The Associated Press

Port Clinton News Herald
Published 14 hours ago

Canton woman among grand prize winners for Vax-2-School amid COVID surge

Titus Wu

Columbus Dispatch

A Canton woman was among the five grand prize winners for Ohio's Vax-2-School lottery.

The state announced the big winners Friday night, as well as the fifth and final round of winners of smaller scholarships.

The grand prizes, a $100,000 scholarship in return for getting vaccinated, went to:

Rinoa Chech, Canton

Jacob Peers, Convover

Avery Lagory, Cleves

Audrey Bird, Brecksville

Widnelson Miller, Delphos

Vax-2-School is an initiative by the Ohio Department of Health to increase COVID-19 vaccination rates among young people, especially with the shot recently being approved for use by those as young as 5 years old.

“This age group has the most room to grow in getting vaccinated and, with the delta variant in our midst, is the group we’re most concerned will miss in-classroom opportunities if they get or are exposed to COVID-19," Gov. Mike DeWine previously said.

As of Friday, only a quarter of Ohioans ages 19 and younger have received their first dose, per state data. The next-lowest rate is for those ages 20 to 29 at 52%. At the same time, the number of COVID cases continued to surge again on Friday, with Ohio recording 9,584 new or probable cases, 3,997 current hospitalizations and 264 new deaths. Since the start of the pandemic, 26,851 Ohioans have died.

Since the governor announced the Vax-2-School prizes on Sept. 23, the vaccination rate for first doses increased roughly from 33% to 40% for Ohioans ages 29 and younger, according to a USA Today Network Ohio Bureau review.

The fifth round of 30 people who have earned $10,000 scholarships in return for getting the COVID-19 shot included Andrew Putt of Massillon.

The program awarded a total of $2 million in prizes: 150 $10,000 scholarships and five $100,000 grand prize scholarships. Prize scholarships are awarded in Ohio 529 College Advantage plans and can be used at any Ohio college, technical or trade school or career program.

Health officials have said it is extremely important for young people to get vaccinated despite older adults being more at risk from serious illness. Some of the newer variants have had more of an effect on young Ohioans.

During the fall peak when the delta variant surged, for instance, Ohio children's hospitals penned a letter to the public, saying that they were seeing COVID-19 cases "more than ever before."

“What’s a little bit different now is that something of a silver lining a year ago … kids were getting infected but weren’t getting particularly sick,” Dr. Hector Wong, an ICU physician at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, had said then. “That’s changed now.”

The Canton Repository and Akron Beacon Journal contributed to this story.

Titus Wu is a reporter for the USA TODAY Network Ohio Bureau, which serves the Columbus Dispatch, Cincinnati Enquirer, Akron Beacon Journal and 18 other affiliated news organizations across Ohio.

Alliance Review
Published 14 hours ago

Parents of accused killer in Michigan school shooting arrested after vehicle was found in Detroit

DETROIT — James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teen charged in the Oxford High School shooting were located and arrested early Saturday in Detroit, a little more than two hours after a citizen saw their vehicle and called police.

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since about noon Friday after they were charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting deaths at the high school in Michigan. Their son, Ethan Crumbley, 15, is accused of fatally shooting four students and injuring seven others at the suburban Detroit high school on Tuesday.

The Crumbley parents did not show for their arraignment Friday afternoon in Rochester Hills, Michigan. The U.S. Marshals Service issued "Wanted" posters and offered a reward for information leading to their arrests.

The investigation of the shootings and the search for the Crumbleys was led by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe said the vehicle was found around 11:30 p.m. Friday.

"The owner of the building arrived and saw the car in the back parking lot, knew it didn’t belong there, went to investigate," McCabe told the Detroit Free Press, part of the USA TODAY Network.

The building's owner immediately recognized the car from information put out by law enforcement, checked the license plate, which matched, and called 911.

By about 1:45 a.m., the Crumbleys were under arrest. The couple was found hiding inside a commercial building and were "distressed," Detroit Police Chief James White told reporters. They were unarmed, he added.

White said police believe someone had let the Crumbleys into the building. He said those who aided the couple could face criminal charges.

Jennifer and James Crumbley were each charged with involuntary manslaughter after Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald said they bought the firearm for their son as a Christmas gift.

During a hearing that started around noon, a lieutenant with the Oakland County Sheriff's Office said the parents were not in custody. The Oakland County Fugitive Team, along with several agencies, were searching for the couple as of Friday evening.

"The action of fleeing and ignoring their attorney certainly adds weight to the charges," Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a release Friday. "They cannot run from their part in this tragedy."

But the family's lawyers said the couple was not fleeing from authorities and were returning to the area after having left town briefly amid the commotion surrounding tragedy.

"The Crumbleys left town on the night of the tragic shooting for their own safety. They are returning to the area to be arraigned," their lawyers Smith and Mariell Lehman said.

The gun had been stored in an unlocked drawer in their house, and Crumbley's parents did not ask where it was when they were called to the school the day of the shooting for a disturbing drawing their son made of a firearm, McDonald said at a news conference Friday.

Ethan Crumbley had posted about the firearm online and researched ammunition while at school, McDonald said the investigation revealed. He was also allowed to return to class on the day of the shooting after the meeting with his parents, she said.

"The facts of this case are so egregious," McDonald said.

Charges for parents of shooter rare, experts say:Michigan school shooting is 'so egregious,' the suspect's parents are charged.

Michigan school shooting suspect faces life in prison: What murder, terrorism charges mean

Crumbley was charged Wednesday as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes in what investigators described as a methodical and deliberate massacre.

When asked whether her office was looking into charges for any school officials, McDonald said the investigation was ongoing.

"While the shooter was the one who entered the high school and pulled the trigger, there are other individuals who contributed to the events on Nov. 30, and it's my intention to hold them accountable as well," she said.

Here's what we know:

Prosecutor: Gun was 'Christmas present'

At a news conference Friday, McDonald laid out how Ethan Crumbley got the weapon other warning signs in the days leading up to the shooting.

McDonald said Ethan Crumbley was there when his father bought the 9mm Sig Sauer SP 2022 on Nov. 26. The same day, the younger Crumbley posted photos of the weapon online, calling it his "new beauty." His mom said in a post the following day, "Mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," McDonald said.

"Clearly based on the statements of the shooter (and) the statements of mom, that was his gun," McDonald said.

Prosecutor: School officials knew shooting suspect searched online for ammo, made drawings

Suspect's drawing prompted worries on day of shooting

The 15-year-old suspect was also caught looking up ammunition online while at school before the shooting. McDonald said school officials contacted his mother about the online search, leaving a voicemail and email, but received no response. Crumbley's mother instead texted him the same day, "LOL I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," McDonald said.

Hours before the shooting, Crumbley was found with a disturbing drawing that included a a firearm and someone who appeared to be bleeding, McDonald said.

A teacher took a photo of the drawing, and Crumbley's parents were immediately contacted. When the drawing was brought to a school counselor with Crumbley and his parents present, Crumbley had altered it, McDonald said.

A counselor told the parents their son needed to get counseling, but Crumbley was able to return to class. His parents did not ask him about the firearm at that time nor did they search his backpack, McDonald said.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom," McDonald added.

After reports of the shooting at the school, Jennifer Crumbley texted her son, "Ethan don't do it," McDonald said. James Crumbley drove home to search for the firearm and called 911 to report it missing, saying he believed his son was the shooter, McDonald said.

"I'm angry as a mother. I'm angry as the prosecutor. I'm angry as a person that lives in this county. I'm angry. There were a lot of things that could have been so simple to prevent," McDonald said.

Slew of copycat threats across metro Detroit trouble schools, parents

Copycat threats circulated on social media and districts canceled classes Thursday out of caution for students' safety.

A 17-year-old student in Southfield, about 30 miles from Oxford High School, was arrested Thursday with a semi-automatic pistol. A bomb threat was also made at South Lake High School, about 45 miles from Oxford, and prompted a police investigation.

“If you’re making threats, we’re going to find you,” Bouchard said during a news conference Thursday that was specifically called to address the estimated hundreds of copycat threats reported. “It is ridiculous you’re inflaming the fears and passion of parents, teachers, and the community in the midst of a real tragedy.”

The FBI and Secret Service are also investigating threats.

People who make false threats could face charges for false threat of terrorism, which is a 20-year felony, and misdemeanor malicious use of a telephone, McDonald said.

Meanwhile, parents are walking a fine line of ensuring their children's security without affecting their kids' mental and emotional health.

"I felt like I was going to throw up," said Jill Dillon, 51, recalling dropping off her 14-year-old son to school Wednesday morning. "It was nauseating, thinking that I'm supposed to be taking him someplace safe, and is he really going to be safe?"

David Roden, a 14-year-old freshman at Northville High School, which stayed open Thursday, said the confusion of what's real and what's not was the scariest part.

"Everyone was on edge. It's just kind of weird, being close to the situation," he said.

— Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press

Fake Instagram accounts multiply

Fake social media accounts claiming to be the 15-year-old charged in the Oxford High School shooting began popping up even before his name was released by law enforcement, and some made threats about additional shootings and plans for revenge.

While direct threats may lead to criminal charges, the spread of false information via deceiving accounts is a common problem in the wake of mass shootings, often is not illegal and sometimes does not violate social media platforms’ terms of service.

“Unfortunately, poor taste is not against the law,” said Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police.

It is unlikely any social media accounts that chronicled Crumbley’s alleged criminal activity remain active on these platforms, said Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan's School of Information.

In active threat situations, the social media accounts of alleged perpetrators are taken down through an opaque process, Lampe said. Platforms are alerted either by their own algorithms or by law enforcement.

The tendency of social media platforms to make some user accounts “disappear in the night” can help feed the creation of these fake accounts, Lampe said. However, the common practice of setting up “sock puppets” online would happen regardless, he said.

— Ashley Nerbovig, Detroit Free Press

Contributing: Darcie Moran, Tyler J. Davis, Phoebe Wall Howard, Elisha Anderson, Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press; Christine Fernando, USA TODAY; The Associated Press

Alliance Review
Published 14 hours ago

Parents of accused killer in Michigan school shooting arrested after vehicle was found in Detroit

DETROIT — James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teen charged in the Oxford High School shooting were located and arrested early Saturday in Detroit, a little more than two hours after a citizen saw their vehicle and called police.

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since about noon Friday after they were charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting deaths at the high school in Michigan. Their son, Ethan Crumbley, 15, is accused of fatally shooting four students and injuring seven others at the suburban Detroit high school on Tuesday.

The Crumbley parents did not show for their arraignment Friday afternoon in Rochester Hills, Michigan. The U.S. Marshals Service issued "Wanted" posters and offered a reward for information leading to their arrests.

The investigation of the shootings and the search for the Crumbleys was led by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe said the vehicle was found around 11:30 p.m. Friday.

"The owner of the building arrived and saw the car in the back parking lot, knew it didn’t belong there, went to investigate," McCabe told the Detroit Free Press, part of the USA TODAY Network.

The building's owner immediately recognized the car from information put out by law enforcement, checked the license plate, which matched, and called 911.

By about 1:45 a.m., the Crumbleys were under arrest. The couple was found hiding inside a commercial building and were "distressed," Detroit Police Chief James White told reporters. They were unarmed, he added.

White said police believe someone had let the Crumbleys into the building. He said those who aided the couple could face criminal charges.

Jennifer and James Crumbley were each charged with involuntary manslaughter after Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald said they bought the firearm for their son as a Christmas gift.

During a hearing that started around noon, a lieutenant with the Oakland County Sheriff's Office said the parents were not in custody. The Oakland County Fugitive Team, along with several agencies, were searching for the couple as of Friday evening.

"The action of fleeing and ignoring their attorney certainly adds weight to the charges," Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a release Friday. "They cannot run from their part in this tragedy."

But the family's lawyers said the couple was not fleeing from authorities and were returning to the area after having left town briefly amid the commotion surrounding tragedy.

"The Crumbleys left town on the night of the tragic shooting for their own safety. They are returning to the area to be arraigned," their lawyers Smith and Mariell Lehman said.

The gun had been stored in an unlocked drawer in their house, and Crumbley's parents did not ask where it was when they were called to the school the day of the shooting for a disturbing drawing their son made of a firearm, McDonald said at a news conference Friday.

Ethan Crumbley had posted about the firearm online and researched ammunition while at school, McDonald said the investigation revealed. He was also allowed to return to class on the day of the shooting after the meeting with his parents, she said.

"The facts of this case are so egregious," McDonald said.

Charges for parents of shooter rare, experts say:Michigan school shooting is 'so egregious,' the suspect's parents are charged.

Michigan school shooting suspect faces life in prison: What murder, terrorism charges mean

Crumbley was charged Wednesday as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes in what investigators described as a methodical and deliberate massacre.

When asked whether her office was looking into charges for any school officials, McDonald said the investigation was ongoing.

"While the shooter was the one who entered the high school and pulled the trigger, there are other individuals who contributed to the events on Nov. 30, and it's my intention to hold them accountable as well," she said.

Here's what we know:

Prosecutor: Gun was 'Christmas present'

At a news conference Friday, McDonald laid out how Ethan Crumbley got the weapon other warning signs in the days leading up to the shooting.

McDonald said Ethan Crumbley was there when his father bought the 9mm Sig Sauer SP 2022 on Nov. 26. The same day, the younger Crumbley posted photos of the weapon online, calling it his "new beauty." His mom said in a post the following day, "Mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," McDonald said.

"Clearly based on the statements of the shooter (and) the statements of mom, that was his gun," McDonald said.

Prosecutor: School officials knew shooting suspect searched online for ammo, made drawings

Suspect's drawing prompted worries on day of shooting

The 15-year-old suspect was also caught looking up ammunition online while at school before the shooting. McDonald said school officials contacted his mother about the online search, leaving a voicemail and email, but received no response. Crumbley's mother instead texted him the same day, "LOL I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," McDonald said.

Hours before the shooting, Crumbley was found with a disturbing drawing that included a a firearm and someone who appeared to be bleeding, McDonald said.

A teacher took a photo of the drawing, and Crumbley's parents were immediately contacted. When the drawing was brought to a school counselor with Crumbley and his parents present, Crumbley had altered it, McDonald said.

A counselor told the parents their son needed to get counseling, but Crumbley was able to return to class. His parents did not ask him about the firearm at that time nor did they search his backpack, McDonald said.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom," McDonald added.

After reports of the shooting at the school, Jennifer Crumbley texted her son, "Ethan don't do it," McDonald said. James Crumbley drove home to search for the firearm and called 911 to report it missing, saying he believed his son was the shooter, McDonald said.

"I'm angry as a mother. I'm angry as the prosecutor. I'm angry as a person that lives in this county. I'm angry. There were a lot of things that could have been so simple to prevent," McDonald said.

Slew of copycat threats across metro Detroit trouble schools, parents

Copycat threats circulated on social media and districts canceled classes Thursday out of caution for students' safety.

A 17-year-old student in Southfield, about 30 miles from Oxford High School, was arrested Thursday with a semi-automatic pistol. A bomb threat was also made at South Lake High School, about 45 miles from Oxford, and prompted a police investigation.

“If you’re making threats, we’re going to find you,” Bouchard said during a news conference Thursday that was specifically called to address the estimated hundreds of copycat threats reported. “It is ridiculous you’re inflaming the fears and passion of parents, teachers, and the community in the midst of a real tragedy.”

The FBI and Secret Service are also investigating threats.

People who make false threats could face charges for false threat of terrorism, which is a 20-year felony, and misdemeanor malicious use of a telephone, McDonald said.

Meanwhile, parents are walking a fine line of ensuring their children's security without affecting their kids' mental and emotional health.

"I felt like I was going to throw up," said Jill Dillon, 51, recalling dropping off her 14-year-old son to school Wednesday morning. "It was nauseating, thinking that I'm supposed to be taking him someplace safe, and is he really going to be safe?"

David Roden, a 14-year-old freshman at Northville High School, which stayed open Thursday, said the confusion of what's real and what's not was the scariest part.

"Everyone was on edge. It's just kind of weird, being close to the situation," he said.

— Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press

Fake Instagram accounts multiply

Fake social media accounts claiming to be the 15-year-old charged in the Oxford High School shooting began popping up even before his name was released by law enforcement, and some made threats about additional shootings and plans for revenge.

While direct threats may lead to criminal charges, the spread of false information via deceiving accounts is a common problem in the wake of mass shootings, often is not illegal and sometimes does not violate social media platforms’ terms of service.

“Unfortunately, poor taste is not against the law,” said Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police.

It is unlikely any social media accounts that chronicled Crumbley’s alleged criminal activity remain active on these platforms, said Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan's School of Information.

In active threat situations, the social media accounts of alleged perpetrators are taken down through an opaque process, Lampe said. Platforms are alerted either by their own algorithms or by law enforcement.

The tendency of social media platforms to make some user accounts “disappear in the night” can help feed the creation of these fake accounts, Lampe said. However, the common practice of setting up “sock puppets” online would happen regardless, he said.

— Ashley Nerbovig, Detroit Free Press

Contributing: Darcie Moran, Tyler J. Davis, Phoebe Wall Howard, Elisha Anderson, Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press; Christine Fernando, USA TODAY; The Associated Press

Zanesville Times Recorder
Published 14 hours ago

Parents of accused killer in Michigan school shooting arrested after vehicle was found in Detroit

DETROIT — James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teen charged in the Oxford High School shooting were located and arrested early Saturday in Detroit, a little more than two hours after a citizen saw their vehicle and called police.

Authorities had been searching for the Crumbleys since about noon Friday after they were charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter in the shooting deaths at the high school in Michigan. Their son, Ethan Crumbley, 15, is accused of fatally shooting four students and injuring seven others at the suburban Detroit high school on Tuesday.

The Crumbley parents did not show for their arraignment Friday afternoon in Rochester Hills, Michigan. The U.S. Marshals Service issued "Wanted" posters and offered a reward for information leading to their arrests.

The investigation of the shootings and the search for the Crumbleys was led by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. Oakland County Undersheriff Mike McCabe said the vehicle was found around 11:30 p.m. Friday.

"The owner of the building arrived and saw the car in the back parking lot, knew it didn’t belong there, went to investigate," McCabe told the Detroit Free Press, part of the USA TODAY Network.

The building's owner immediately recognized the car from information put out by law enforcement, checked the license plate, which matched, and called 911.

By about 1:45 a.m., the Crumbleys were under arrest. The couple was found hiding inside a commercial building and were "distressed," Detroit Police Chief James White told reporters. They were unarmed, he added.

White said police believe someone had let the Crumbleys into the building. He said those who aided the couple could face criminal charges.

Jennifer and James Crumbley were each charged with involuntary manslaughter after Oakland County Prosecutor Karen McDonald said they bought the firearm for their son as a Christmas gift.

During a hearing that started around noon, a lieutenant with the Oakland County Sheriff's Office said the parents were not in custody. The Oakland County Fugitive Team, along with several agencies, were searching for the couple as of Friday evening.

"The action of fleeing and ignoring their attorney certainly adds weight to the charges," Oakland County Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a release Friday. "They cannot run from their part in this tragedy."

But the family's lawyers said the couple was not fleeing from authorities and were returning to the area after having left town briefly amid the commotion surrounding tragedy.

"The Crumbleys left town on the night of the tragic shooting for their own safety. They are returning to the area to be arraigned," their lawyers Smith and Mariell Lehman said.

The gun had been stored in an unlocked drawer in their house, and Crumbley's parents did not ask where it was when they were called to the school the day of the shooting for a disturbing drawing their son made of a firearm, McDonald said at a news conference Friday.

Ethan Crumbley had posted about the firearm online and researched ammunition while at school, McDonald said the investigation revealed. He was also allowed to return to class on the day of the shooting after the meeting with his parents, she said.

"The facts of this case are so egregious," McDonald said.

Charges for parents of shooter rare, experts say:Michigan school shooting is 'so egregious,' the suspect's parents are charged.

Michigan school shooting suspect faces life in prison: What murder, terrorism charges mean

Crumbley was charged Wednesday as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes in what investigators described as a methodical and deliberate massacre.

When asked whether her office was looking into charges for any school officials, McDonald said the investigation was ongoing.

"While the shooter was the one who entered the high school and pulled the trigger, there are other individuals who contributed to the events on Nov. 30, and it's my intention to hold them accountable as well," she said.

Here's what we know:

Prosecutor: Gun was 'Christmas present'

At a news conference Friday, McDonald laid out how Ethan Crumbley got the weapon other warning signs in the days leading up to the shooting.

McDonald said Ethan Crumbley was there when his father bought the 9mm Sig Sauer SP 2022 on Nov. 26. The same day, the younger Crumbley posted photos of the weapon online, calling it his "new beauty." His mom said in a post the following day, "Mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present," McDonald said.

"Clearly based on the statements of the shooter (and) the statements of mom, that was his gun," McDonald said.

Prosecutor: School officials knew shooting suspect searched online for ammo, made drawings

Suspect's drawing prompted worries on day of shooting

The 15-year-old suspect was also caught looking up ammunition online while at school before the shooting. McDonald said school officials contacted his mother about the online search, leaving a voicemail and email, but received no response. Crumbley's mother instead texted him the same day, "LOL I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught," McDonald said.

Hours before the shooting, Crumbley was found with a disturbing drawing that included a a firearm and someone who appeared to be bleeding, McDonald said.

A teacher took a photo of the drawing, and Crumbley's parents were immediately contacted. When the drawing was brought to a school counselor with Crumbley and his parents present, Crumbley had altered it, McDonald said.

A counselor told the parents their son needed to get counseling, but Crumbley was able to return to class. His parents did not ask him about the firearm at that time nor did they search his backpack, McDonald said.

"Of course, he shouldn't have gone back to that classroom," McDonald added.

After reports of the shooting at the school, Jennifer Crumbley texted her son, "Ethan don't do it," McDonald said. James Crumbley drove home to search for the firearm and called 911 to report it missing, saying he believed his son was the shooter, McDonald said.

"I'm angry as a mother. I'm angry as the prosecutor. I'm angry as a person that lives in this county. I'm angry. There were a lot of things that could have been so simple to prevent," McDonald said.

Slew of copycat threats across metro Detroit trouble schools, parents

Copycat threats circulated on social media and districts canceled classes Thursday out of caution for students' safety.

A 17-year-old student in Southfield, about 30 miles from Oxford High School, was arrested Thursday with a semi-automatic pistol. A bomb threat was also made at South Lake High School, about 45 miles from Oxford, and prompted a police investigation.

“If you’re making threats, we’re going to find you,” Bouchard said during a news conference Thursday that was specifically called to address the estimated hundreds of copycat threats reported. “It is ridiculous you’re inflaming the fears and passion of parents, teachers, and the community in the midst of a real tragedy.”

The FBI and Secret Service are also investigating threats.

People who make false threats could face charges for false threat of terrorism, which is a 20-year felony, and misdemeanor malicious use of a telephone, McDonald said.

Meanwhile, parents are walking a fine line of ensuring their children's security without affecting their kids' mental and emotional health.

"I felt like I was going to throw up," said Jill Dillon, 51, recalling dropping off her 14-year-old son to school Wednesday morning. "It was nauseating, thinking that I'm supposed to be taking him someplace safe, and is he really going to be safe?"

David Roden, a 14-year-old freshman at Northville High School, which stayed open Thursday, said the confusion of what's real and what's not was the scariest part.

"Everyone was on edge. It's just kind of weird, being close to the situation," he said.

— Miriam Marini, Detroit Free Press

Fake Instagram accounts multiply

Fake social media accounts claiming to be the 15-year-old charged in the Oxford High School shooting began popping up even before his name was released by law enforcement, and some made threats about additional shootings and plans for revenge.

While direct threats may lead to criminal charges, the spread of false information via deceiving accounts is a common problem in the wake of mass shootings, often is not illegal and sometimes does not violate social media platforms’ terms of service.

“Unfortunately, poor taste is not against the law,” said Lt. Mike Shaw of the Michigan State Police.

It is unlikely any social media accounts that chronicled Crumbley’s alleged criminal activity remain active on these platforms, said Cliff Lampe, a professor at the University of Michigan's School of Information.

In active threat situations, the social media accounts of alleged perpetrators are taken down through an opaque process, Lampe said. Platforms are alerted either by their own algorithms or by law enforcement.

The tendency of social media platforms to make some user accounts “disappear in the night” can help feed the creation of these fake accounts, Lampe said. However, the common practice of setting up “sock puppets” online would happen regardless, he said.

— Ashley Nerbovig, Detroit Free Press

Contributing: Darcie Moran, Tyler J. Davis, Phoebe Wall Howard, Elisha Anderson, Paul Egan, Detroit Free Press; Christine Fernando, USA TODAY; The Associated Press

Columbus Dispatch
Published 14 hours ago

Nevada's governor apologizes for the state's past role in Indigenous schools

Stewart Indian School students are seen in a classroom in Carson, Nev., in an undated photo. The state of Nevada plans to fully cooperate with federal efforts to investigate the history of Native American boarding schools.

Courtesy of Stewart Indian School Cultural Center and Museum via AP

CARSON CITY, Nev. — When it was time for Winona James to return to school, her family hid her in brush near their home in the Carson Valley to prevent officials from the Stewart Indian School from finding her.

James, a member of the Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California, was among the more than 20,000 students who were sent to the boarding school as part of a federal program designed to forcibly assimilate Native Americans into dominant Euro-American culture. She attended for one year, but her family feared for her life.

"I can remember that my grandmother didn't want me to come back to Stewart because she thought I would never, ever go back home again," she said in interview for a University of Nevada, Reno history initiative in 1984.

The Stewart School in Carson City is among more than 350 residential schools that the U.S. Interior Department plans to examine as part of the Federal Boarding School Initiative Review, which includes an investigation into student deaths and known and possible burial sites.

On Friday, Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak heard stories from tribal elders about the school's history. The governor, tribal leaders, state agency heads and Interior officials discussed ways the state — which funded the school's construction and helped gather children to send there — can contribute to the federal efforts to confront historic injustices and intergenerational trauma and honor the children who died at boarding schools.

Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak speaks at the Stewart Indian School on Friday in Carson City.

Samuel Metz / AP

Descendants of Paiute, Washoe and Shoshone people who attended the Stewart School during the 90 years it was in operation told stories of bounties being offered to bring Native children to the school; of students attempting to run away due to starvation; and of extreme overcrowding in dormitories.

"It is a tragedy that it has taken so long for the federal government to undertake an honest accounting of an immoral program that existed here for generations," Sisolak said at the Stewart Indian School, which now houses a cultural center and museum.

The governor apologized on behalf of the state and promised to fully cooperate with the Interior Department and its first Native American secretary, Deb Haaland, as they review records and investigate the federal government's past policies and oversight of Native American boarding schools.

A lack of records hinders accounting of children's deaths at the Stewart Indian School

Stacey Montooth, executive director of the Nevada Indian Commission, said it was unclear how many children had attended or died at the Stewart Indian School.

Though the federal government never focused on keeping track of students, Montooth said, the fact that it took all records and archival materials when it shuttered the school in 1980 has made accounting for deaths difficult.

Despite the lack of available archival material, Native Americans in Nevada continue to reckon with the history of boarding schools, she said: "There's not a Paiute, Shoshone or Washoe person in this state who doesn't have a direct connection to this campus."

Since children's remains were discovered at a residential school in Canada, tribes both there and in the United States have pushed the government to acknowledge the enduring effects of policies that Pennsylvania boarding school founder Richard Pratt described in the 19th century as "Kill the Indian, Save the Man."

Native children as young as 4 were forcibly taken from their families and sent to off-reservation boarding schools. Their hair was cut. They were converted to Christianity. And they were prohibited from speaking their native languages. They were often subjected to military-style discipline and, until reforms in the mid-20th century, curriculums focused heavily on vocational skills and, for girls, homemaking.

Historians say many of the schools were overcrowded, physical abuse was widespread, and many students died and were buried in unmarked graves.

Tribal leaders believe children were secretly buried somewhere on the campus of the Stewart School but have not yet decided whether to dig up and repatriate bodies back to their homes or to honor them by leaving them in the ground as is custom for many tribes, including the Shoshone. In New Mexico, Utah and elsewhere, researchers are using ground-penetrating radar to search for remains. Sisolak said it would be tribal leaders' decision how to investigate the history.

Amber Torres, chairwoman of the Walker River Paiute Tribe, said assimilation policies like boarding schools robbed Native Americans and their descendants of Indigenous languages. She wants Nevada to teach languages like Washoe, Paiute and Shoshone in public schools to ensure language survives.

"If it dies, we die," she said.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

WCBE 90.5 FM - Columbus
Published 14 hours ago

Nevada's governor apologizes for the state's past role in Indigenous schools

By The Associated Press

Published December 4, 2021 at 9:26 AM EST

Stewart Indian School students are seen in a classroom in Carson, Nev., in an undated photo. The state of Nevada plans to fully cooperate with federal efforts to investigate the history of Native American boarding schools.

CARSON CITY, Nev. — When it was time for Winona James to return to school, her family hid her in brush near their home in the Carson Valley to prevent officials from the Stewart Indian School from finding her.

James, a member of the Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California, was among the more than 20,000 students who were sent to the boarding school as part of a federal program designed to forcibly assimilate Native Americans into dominant Euro-American culture. She attended for one year, but her family feared for her life.

"I can remember that my grandmother didn't want me to come back to Stewart because she thought I would never, ever go back home again," she said in interview for a University of Nevada, Reno history initiative in 1984.

The Stewart School in Carson City is among more than 350 residential schools that the U.S. Interior Department plans to examine as part of the Federal Boarding School Initiative Review, which includes an investigation into student deaths and known and possible burial sites.

On Friday, Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak heard stories from tribal elders about the school's history. The governor, tribal leaders, state agency heads and Interior officials discussed ways the state — which funded the school's construction and helped gather children to send there — can contribute to the federal efforts to confront historic injustices and intergenerational trauma and honor the children who died at boarding schools.

Samuel Metz / AP

Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak speaks at the Stewart Indian School on Friday in Carson City.

Descendants of Paiute, Washoe and Shoshone people who attended the Stewart School during the 90 years it was in operation told stories of bounties being offered to bring Native children to the school; of students attempting to run away due to starvation; and of extreme overcrowding in dormitories.

"It is a tragedy that it has taken so long for the federal government to undertake an honest accounting of an immoral program that existed here for generations," Sisolak said at the Stewart Indian School, which now houses a cultural center and museum.

The governor apologized on behalf of the state and promised to fully cooperate with the Interior Department and its first Native American secretary, Deb Haaland, as they review records and investigate the federal government's past policies and oversight of Native American boarding schools.

A lack of records hinders accounting of children's deaths at the Stewart Indian School

Stacey Montooth, executive director of the Nevada Indian Commission, said it was unclear how many children had attended or died at the Stewart Indian School.

Though the federal government never focused on keeping track of students, Montooth said, the fact that it took all records and archival materials when it shuttered the school in 1980 has made accounting for deaths difficult.

Despite the lack of available archival material, Native Americans in Nevada continue to reckon with the history of boarding schools, she said: "There's not a Paiute, Shoshone or Washoe person in this state who doesn't have a direct connection to this campus."

Since children's remains were discovered at a residential school in Canada, tribes both there and in the United States have pushed the government to acknowledge the enduring effects of policies that Pennsylvania boarding school founder Richard Pratt described in the 19th century as "Kill the Indian, Save the Man."

Native children as young as 4 were forcibly taken from their families and sent to off-reservation boarding schools. Their hair was cut. They were converted to Christianity. And they were prohibited from speaking their native languages. They were often subjected to military-style discipline and, until reforms in the mid-20th century, curriculums focused heavily on vocational skills and, for girls, homemaking.

Historians say many of the schools were overcrowded, physical abuse was widespread, and many students died and were buried in unmarked graves.

Tribal leaders believe children were secretly buried somewhere on the campus of the Stewart School but have not yet decided whether to dig up and repatriate bodies back to their homes or to honor them by leaving them in the ground as is custom for many tribes, including the Shoshone. In New Mexico, Utah and elsewhere, researchers are using ground-penetrating radar to search for remains. Sisolak said it would be tribal leaders' decision how to investigate the history.

Amber Torres, chairwoman of the Walker River Paiute Tribe, said assimilation policies like boarding schools robbed Native Americans and their descendants of Indigenous languages. She wants Nevada to teach languages like Washoe, Paiute and Shoshone in public schools to ensure language survives.

"If it dies, we die," she said.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NPR News

WKSU 89.7
Published 14 hours ago

Parents captured after son charged in Oxford school shooting

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, officials said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in a commercial building in Detroit that housed artwork, Detroit Police Chief James E. White told a news conference. White said the couple “were aided in getting into the building,” and that a person who helped them may also face charges.

A Detroit business owner spotted a car tied to the Crumbleys in his parking lot late Friday, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A woman seen near the vehicle ran away when the business owner called 911, McCabe said. The couple was later located and arrested by Detroit police.

A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the Crumbleys on Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.

The Crumbleys committed “egregious” acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

Authorities had been looking for the couple since Friday afternoon. Late Friday, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to their arrests.

The Crumbley’s attorney, Shannon Smith, said the pair had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety.” Smith told The Associated Press they would be returning to Oxford to be arraigned.

However, White said the Crumbleys “appeared to be hiding” in the building where they were found. He added that the parents appeared to be “distressed” when they were captured.

“Head down… just very upset,” he said of one of the parents.

‘Ethan, don’t do it’: Parent of suspect sent disturbing text before school shooting

The couple was expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail, McCabe said.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He’s charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a “war zone” and won’t be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, “No discipline was warranted.”

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. … I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah,” she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”

WJW TV - My Fox Cleveland
Published 14 hours ago

Penobscots don't want ancestors' scalping to be whitewashed

Caption

Dawn Neptune Adams holds a copy of the Phips Proclamation of 1755, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021, in Bangor, Maine. Adams recently co-directed a film that focuses on the proclamation, one of the dozens of government-issued bounty proclamations that directed colonial settlers to hunt, scalp and kill Indigenous people for money. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Credit: Robert F. Bukaty

Credit: Robert F. Bukaty

Nation & World

By DAVID SHARP, Associated Press

Updated 15 minutes ago

Most Americans know about atrocities endured by Native Americans after the arrival of European settlers — wars, disease, stolen land

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Most Americans know about atrocities endured by Native Americans after the arrival of European settlers: wars, disease, stolen land. But they aren’t always taught the extent of the indiscriminate killings.

Members of the Penobscot Nation in Maine have produced an educational film addressing how European settlers scalped — killed — Indigenous people during the British colonial era, spurred for decades by cash bounties and with the government’s blessing.

“It was genocide,” said Dawn Neptune Adams, one of the three Penobscot Nation members featured in the film, called “Bounty.”

She said the point of the effort isn’t to make any Americans feel defensive or blamed. The filmmakers say they simply want to ensure this history isn’t whitewashed by promoting a fuller understanding of the nation’s past.

At the heart of the project is a chilling declaration by Spencer Phips, lieutenant governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay.

Issued in November 1755, it gave “His Majesty’s Subjects” license to kill Penobscots for “this entire month.” The reward was about $12,000 in today’s dollars for the scalp of a man, and half that for a woman’s scalp. The amount was slightly less for a child. Settlers who killed Indigenous people were sometimes rewarded with land, in addition to money, expanding settlers’ reach while displacing tribes from their ancestral lands.

The declaration is familiar to many Penobscots because a copy of the document was displayed at the tribal offices at Indian Island, Maine.

“If every American knew the whole history of this country, even the dark and uncomfortable parts, it would help us to get along better and to understand each other better,” said Maulian Dana, who co-directed the film with Neptune Adams.

Both Europeans and Native Americans engaged in scalping, but English colonists greatly expanded the practice when the government sanctioned the effort with bounties, the filmmakers said.

The first known colonial scalping order is from 1675. That’s just a few short decades after the first Thanksgiving in 1621, when Pilgrims gathered with Wampanoag people for a harvest celebration, said Chris Newell, who is Passamaquoddy and wrote “If You Lived During the Plimoth Thanksgiving.”

All told, there were more than 70 bounty proclamations encouraging white colonists to kill tribal members in what’s now New England, and another 50 government-sanctioned proclamations elsewhere across the country, the filmmakers’ research found. State and colonial governments paid out at least 375 bounties for Indigenous people across New England between 1675 to 1760, they said.

Emerson Baker, a Salem State University professor who specializes in New England history, called the tribal education effort “a powerful course correction.”

“Most people realize that Native Americans were here first and that the colonists did their best to remove them from the land. They just have no idea of the extremes that it took,” Baker said. “Pretty much any Native American man, woman or child was considered fair game at times, and sometimes by the government.”

Collaborating with the Massachusetts-based Upstander Project, the filmmakers released “Bounty” in November during National Native American Heritage Month.

Neptune Adams and Dana, along with Tim Shay and their families, were filmed at the Old State House in Boston. It’s the same location where Lt. Gov. Phips’ scalping order was signed.

In “Bounty,” the three participants describe having nightmares of Penobscots being chased through the woods, and discuss the dehumanization and massacre of their people.

“When you learn about a people’s humanity, that affects how you treat my kids, how you vote on public policy, how you may view my people,” Dana said.

Accompanying the short video is a 200-page study guide aimed at teachers. Several school districts, including Portland Public Schools in Maine’s largest city, are purchasing licenses for the video and plan to use the study guides to assist instruction.

In Portland, the scalp bounties will be included as one element in a curriculum that will bring the school district into compliance with a 2001 law requiring students to be taught Wabanaki Studies focusing on Native Americans in Maine, said Fiona Hopper, social studies teacher leader and Wabanaki studies coordinator.

“Students and teachers will see in ‘Bounty’ the ongoing endurance and resistance of Penobscot Nation citizens,” Hopper said.

___

Follow David Sharp on Twitter at https://twitter.com/David_Sharp_AP

Caption

Dawn Neptune Adams stands on the banks of the Penobscot River, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021, on Indian Island, Maine. When Adams was a child she was one of the many Penobscot and Passamaquoddy people who were removed from their homes by the state of Maine and placed with white foster families. She recently co-directed a film that focuses on the Phips Proclamation of 1755, one of the dozens of government-issued bounty proclamations that directed colonial settlers to hunt, scalp and kill Indigenous people for money. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Credit: Robert F. Bukaty

Caption

Dawn Neptune Adams stands on the banks of the Penobscot River, Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021, on Indian Island, Maine. When Adams was a child she was one of the many Penobscot and Passamaquoddy people who were removed from their homes by the state of Maine and placed with white foster families. She recently co-directed a film that focuses on the Phips Proclamation of 1755, one of the dozens of government-issued bounty proclamations that directed colonial settlers to hunt, scalp and kill Indigenous people for money. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Credit: Robert F. Bukaty

Credit: Robert F. Bukaty

Springfield News Sun
Published 14 hours ago

Legal-Ease: Laws on gift cards

By Lee R. Schroeder - Guest Columnist

This year, our nation’s pending supply chain issues along with some health concerns associated with visiting some public places add people to the pre-existing list of folks who typically buy gift cards/certificates and allow the receiver to choose his or her own gifts.

Traditional gift cards like those picked up from displays and kiosks at the entrances/exits of many stores are governed by certain, specific state and federal laws. Those cards may be for specific businesses or restaurants or may be able to be used in various locations (if the card carries a bank logo like “Visa” or “MasterCard”). This column uses the term “gift cards,” even though the law on gift cards also extends to most gift certificates and online codes that unlock financial credits, if money is paid to receive the credit/code.

Gift cards are permitted to have expiration dates. However, federal law requires that expiration dates for gift cards cannot be any sooner than five years from the date of activation of the card.

The gift card company can charge a “dormancy fee” if a card is not used (in whole or in part) within a one-year period, but Ohio law requires that dormancy fees cannot begin to be applied until at least two years from the date of activation of the card.

Any legally permissible dormancy fees are required to be laid out in writing that accompanies the purchased gift card. Even though we know that most people do not read written disclosures like those that are required to accompany gift card purchases, possibly the most helpful legal disclosure requirement is that each gift card must include a telephone number to contact the card issuer about fees, etc.

These laws do not apply to gift cards that are provided as refunds for purchases (i.e. buy this mobile phone, and we will give you a free gift card). Further, telephone-specific cards and many “reloadable” cards are not subject to all of the laws set forth above.

There is also an Ohio-specific law that mirrors federal laws. The significance of the Ohio law is that someone who is harmed by a gift card issuer’s violation of the expiration and dormancy fee law can recover court costs and attorneys’ fees in lawsuits against gift card issuers.

Notably, though, the Ohio law exempts a variety of gift cards from the Ohio rules on expiration dates and dormancy fees. Gift cards sold by charities (like my local, Catholic elementary school) and gift cards given to employees to use only at the employees’ employer are exempt from the Ohio law on this topic. And the “We have not seen you in a while, so here is a $10 credit toward your next oil change” gift cards are not subject to Ohio laws on this subject either, largely because no money was paid for the gift card. Similarly, “percentage-off” or “cash-off” codes like those frequently discussed in social media from retailers like Kohl’s department stores are not subject to the Ohio law.

https://www.limaohio.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/54/2021/12/web1_Schro…

Lee R. Schroeder is an Ohio licensed attorney at Schroeder Law LLC in Putnam County. He limits his practice to business, real estate, estate planning and agriculture issues in northwest Ohio. He can be reached at Lee@LeeSchroeder.com or at 419-659-2058. This article is not intended to serve as legal advice, and specific advice should be sought from the licensed attorney of your choice based upon the specific facts and circumstances that you face.

Lee R. Schroeder is an Ohio licensed attorney at Schroeder Law LLC in Putnam County. He limits his practice to business, real estate, estate planning and agriculture issues in northwest Ohio. He can be reached at Lee@LeeSchroeder.com or at 419-659-2058. This article is not intended to serve as legal advice, and specific advice should be sought from the licensed attorney of your choice based upon the specific facts and circumstances that you face.

Post navigation

Lima News
Published 14 hours ago

Parents captured after son charged in Oxford school shooting

Caption

James, left, and Jennifer Crumbley are shown during the video arraignment of their son, Ethan Crumbley in Rochester Hills, Mich., on Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against the Crumbleys whose 15-year-old son is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school. (

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Nation & World

By COREY WILLIAMS and ED WHITE, Associated Press

Updated 3 hours ago

A sheriff's office in Michigan says the parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a high school have been caught early Saturday

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, officials said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in a commercial building in Detroit that housed artwork, Detroit Police Chief James E. White told a news conference. White said the couple “were aided in getting into the building,” and that a person who helped them may also face charges.

A Detroit business owner spotted a car tied to the Crumbleys in his parking lot late Friday, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A woman seen near the vehicle ran away when the business owner called 911, McCabe said. The couple was later located and arrested by Detroit police.

A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the Crumbleys on Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.

The Crumbleys committed "egregious" acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

Authorities had been looking for the couple since Friday afternoon. Late Friday, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to their arrests.

The Crumbley's attorney, Shannon Smith, said the pair had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety.” Smith told The Associated Press they would be returning to Oxford to be arraigned.

However, White said the Crumbleys “appeared to be hiding” in the building where they were found. He added that the parents appeared to be “distressed” when they were captured.

“Head down... just very upset,” he said of one of the parents.

The couple was expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail, McCabe said.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He's charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a "war zone" and won't be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, “No discipline was warranted.”

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. ... I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah,” she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”

___

White reported from Detroit. Associated Press journalist Mike Householder in Detroit and David Eggert in Lansing, Mich., also contributed to this report.

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows James Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows James Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows Jennifer Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This undated handout provided by the Oakland County Sheriff's Office shows Jennifer Crumbley. A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges Friday, Dec. 3, 20201 against James and Jennifer Crumbley, whose 15-year-old son, Ethan Crumbley is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school.(Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

An Oakland County Sheriff's deputy, left, and an Oxford police officer search the grounds outside of the Crumbley residence while seeking James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of alleged Oxford High School shooter Ethan Crumbley, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

An Oakland County Sheriff's deputy, left, and an Oxford police officer search the grounds outside of the Crumbley residence while seeking James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of alleged Oxford High School shooter Ethan Crumbley, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 in Oxford, Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Three Oakland County Sheriff's deputies survey the grounds outside of the Crumbley residence while seeking James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of alleged Oxford High School shooter Ethan Crumbley, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Oxford, Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Three Oakland County Sheriff's deputies survey the grounds outside of the Crumbley residence while seeking James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of alleged Oxford High School shooter Ethan Crumbley, on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Oxford, Mich. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

This booking photo released by the Oakland County, Mich., Sheriff's Office shows Ethan Crumbley, 15, who is charged as an adult with murder and terrorism for a shooting that killed four fellow students and injured more at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., authorities said Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. (Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

This booking photo released by the Oakland County, Mich., Sheriff's Office shows Ethan Crumbley, 15, who is charged as an adult with murder and terrorism for a shooting that killed four fellow students and injured more at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., authorities said Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. (Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Credit: Uncredited

Credit: Uncredited

Caption

Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald addresses the media in her office, Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Pontiac, Mich. McDonald filed involuntary manslaughter charges against Jennifer and James Crumbley, the parents of 15-year-old Ethan Crumbley, who is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school. McDonald says the gun used in the shootings at Oxford High School was purchased by James Crumbley a week ago and given to the boy. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

Credit: Carlos Osorio

Caption

Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald addresses the media in her office, Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, in Pontiac, Mich. McDonald filed involuntary manslaughter charges against Jennifer and James Crumbley, the parents of 15-year-old Ethan Crumbley, who is accused of killing four students at a Michigan high school. McDonald says the gun used in the shootings at Oxford High School was purchased by James Crumbley a week ago and given to the boy. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

Credit: Carlos Osorio

Credit: Carlos Osorio

Caption

Misia Winowski, center left, holds her 14-year-old daughter Madolyne close as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May | MLive.com) Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Misia Winowski, center left, holds her 14-year-old daughter Madolyne close as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May | MLive.com) Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

People gather alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

People gather alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

People gather alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

People gather alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Eighth-grader Laural Bird, 14, at left, holds a candle as her mother Tanya Bird closes her eyes in a group prayer with others gathered alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Eighth-grader Laural Bird, 14, at left, holds a candle as her mother Tanya Bird closes her eyes in a group prayer with others gathered alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

People gather alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Caption

People gather alongside the Oxford community as they seek healing and comfort during a candlelight vigil Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Caption

Oxford residents Blaca Flores and Ashley Sefton place candles at the base of a Christmas tree in a public park Friday, Dec. 3, 2021 along Washington Street in downtown Oxford, Mich. A 15-year-old sophomore opened fire at his Michigan high school on Tuesday, killing four students, including a 16-year-old boy who died in a deputy’s patrol car on the way to a hospital, authorities said. (Jake May/The Flint Journal via AP)

Credit: Jake May

Credit: Jake May

Springfield News Sun
Published 14 hours ago

Senior class ‘set the bar pretty high’ for Springfield program

Caption

Springfield's Te'Sean Smoot, right, and Delian Bradley celebrate a touchdown in the first half against St. Edward in the Division I state championship game on Friday, Dec. 3, 2021, at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium in Canton. David Jablonski/Staff

Credit: David Jablonski

Credit: David Jablonski

CANTON — Springfield’s senior class will go down as one of the most successful groups to ever wear the Wildcats’ Blue and Gold.

They finished their careers with a program-best 42-8 record over four years, including three state playoff appearances and a state runner-up finish.

In the final game of their careers, Springfield’s seniors fell to Lakewood St. Edward 23-13 in the Division I state championship game at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium in Canton.

ExplorePHOTOS: Springfield vs. St. Edward

“They’re resilient,” Springfield coach Maurice Douglass said of his senior class. “They don’t give up. They don’t stop fighting. I’ll go to a bar-room fight with any of them and I’m not afraid of whoever we got to face wherever we’re at. Whatever they ever need from me, I’ll be there for them.”

The Wildcats will graduate 20 players from this year’s squad, including multi-year starters Te’Sean Smoot, Delian Bradley, Jokell Brown and Tywan January.

The senior class’s goal was to transform the program over its four years, said Smoot, who threw for 349 yards and a touchdown and rushed for a 9-yard score in the title game. The Wildcats also won the Greater Western Ohio Conference championship three of the last four years and made four straight playoff appearances.

“We wanted to make a change from the previous years, not really having winning seasons and not making the playoffs and stuff like that,” Smoot said. “So we just came in, we just grinded and stuck together our whole four years. We just wanted to change the program to be able to make runs every year and make a run (for the state title). We got to the state, but we just couldn’t finish the job. It was everything that we imagined that we were going to come to high school and do.”

ExploreMissed opportunities costly in title game

The senior class helped bring a work ethic this offseason that the program hadn’t seen in previous years, Douglass said.

“They were the best group that I’ve had since I’ve been here in Springfield as far as working and believing in each other,” he said. “I think they set the bar pretty high for the next group that’s coming up.”

The Wildcats will return six starters on both sides of the ball, including junior receivers Anthony Brown, Shawn Thigpen and Daylen Bradley, as well sophomore running back Jayvin Norman, junior running back Ramon Browder and freshman center Braydon Tayloe. Defensively, the Wildcats return three linebackers in junior Jaivian Norman, sophomore Kevin Fair and junior Tawfiq Jabbar as well as freshman defensive end Jackson Heims, junior safety Tyron Barnes and sophomore cornerback Aaron Scott.

“We’ll miss these (seniors),” Douglass said. “We’ve got a good group coming back. (Smoot) is the hard part to replace on offense because he did so many things for us, but that’s the challenge you want to have, to keep rebuilding and keep reloading. We’ll be fine. We’ll be back.”

Springfield News Sun
Published 14 hours ago

EXPLAINER: How unusual to charge parents in school shooting?

(AP)– Guns used in U.S. school shootings have often come from the homes of young perpetrators, but parents are rarely charged for the violence that occurs, experts say.

That’s what makes the case against Ethan Crumbley’s parents uncommon, following the fatal shooting of four students at Oxford High School in southeastern Michigan. Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said Jennifer and James Crumbley ignored opportunities to intervene, just a few hours before the bloodshed.

They’re charged with four counts of involuntary manslaughter, while Ethan, 15, is charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

The Crumbley parents, who were taken into custody early Saturday, and their lawyers haven’t commented on the shooting or the charges.

Here’s a look at the issues facing the parents:

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE GUN?

The semi-automatic handgun used in the shooting Tuesday was purchased by James Crumbley on Nov. 26 while his son stood by at the shop, according to investigators.

Over the Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley referred to it on social media as a “Christmas present” for her son, and Ethan posted a picture of it on social media, calling it his “new beauty,” McDonald said.

With some very limited exceptions, minors in Michigan aren’t allowed to possess guns. But there is no Michigan law that requires owners to keep guns locked away from kids.

“So many states do. There’s 23 states plus Washington, D.C., that have some form of a secure storage law,” Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel said.

WILL INVOLUNTARY MANSLAUGHTER BE TOUGH TO PROVE?

“It’s an unusual charge to bring,” said Eve Brensike Primus, who teaches criminal procedure at University of Michigan law school.

Police said Ethan Crumbley emerged from a bathroom and started shooting other students in the hallway at Oxford High. A few hours earlier, he and his parents had met with school officials. A teacher had found a drawing on his desk with a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” according to the prosecutor.

Ethan, who had no disciplinary record, was told to get counseling but was allowed to stay in school. His backpack was not checked for a weapon, McDonald said.

Primus said authorities must show gross negligence by the parents and causation, or the act of causing something.

“The prosecutor is going to need facts to support the argument that these parents really knew there was a risk that their son would take a gun and shoot people dead,” she said. “Not just that their son was troubled in some way. This is a homicide charge that carries years in prison. This is not a small charge.”

In 2000, a Flint-area man pleaded no contest to involuntary manslaughter after a 6-year-old boy who was living with him found a gun in a shoebox and killed a classmate.

WHY AREN’T PARENTS CHARGED MORE OFTEN?

A 2019 assessment by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security found that guns came from the home of a parent or close relative in 76% of school attacks where firearms were used. In about half, the firearms were easily accessible.

But laws aimed at restricting gun access are not always enforced and vary in strength, experts say.

“Our laws haven’t really adapted to the reality of school shootings, and the closest we have are these child access prevention laws,” said Kris Brown, president of the Brady gun control advocacy group

In 2020, the mother of an Indiana teen was placed on probation for failing to remove guns from her home after her mentally ill son threatened to kill students. He fired shots inside his school in 2018. No one was injured but the boy killed himself.

In Washington state, the father of a boy who killed four students at a high school in 2014 was convicted of illegally possessing firearms. He was not charged for the shooting, although one of his guns was used.

WCMH NBC 4 Columbus
Published 14 hours ago

Local Briefs: 12-4-2021

Brown presents program on women’s sports in Wood County

The Wood County Museum is offering December’s Virtual History Series program in partnership with the North Baltimore Public Library. The next free program will be available online on Thursday at noon via Zoom and is presented by Hal Brown, vice president, Wood County Historical Society.

Learn about the female athletes of Wood County long before the implementation of Title IX. This program goes over the early decades of the 20th century when there was a thriving interscholastic basketball program for girls in Ohio. In Wood County the township high schools were the main participants, but the larger schools in Bowling Green and Perrysburg sometimes fielded teams.

Contact the North Baltimore Public Library for Zoom Log-In information at 419-257-3621.

Questions can be directed to the museum at any time by calling 419-352-0967 or email marketing@woodcountyhistory.org.

Forecast

Hazardous weather outlook: Strong west to southwest winds are possible behind a cold front on Monday. Wind gusts in excess of 45 mph are possible.

Today: Mostly cloudy, then gradually becoming sunny, with a high near 44. West wind 5 to 11 mph.

Tonight: Increasing clouds, with a low around 28. West wind around 6 mph becoming calm in the evening.

Sunday: Showers likely after 1 p.m. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 55. East wind 7 to 16 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. Showers and possibly a thunderstorm at night. Low around 36. Breezy. Chance of precipitation is 100%.

Extended: A chance of rain and snow showers before 9 a.m. Monday, then a chance of rain showers between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Partly sunny, with a high near 44. Breezy. Chance of precipitation is 30%. Mostly cloudy at night, with a low around 25. Breezy. Mostly cloudy Tuesday, with a high near 32. A chance of snow at night. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 26. Chance of precipitation is 40%. Partly sunny on Wednesday, with a high near 36. Mostly cloudy at night, with a low around 26. Partly sunny Thursday, with a high near 42. Mostly cloudy at night, with a low around 33. Partly sunny Friday, with a high near 47.

Bowling Green Sentinel Tribune
Published 14 hours ago

Special teacher for special kids: Flick retiring from Penta after 41 years

PERRYSBURG – Michele Flick remembers looking out of her window at the former Penta Vocational School and seeing the view: A roof.

In 2008, when Penta moved to its current campus off Buck Road, she showed then-Superintendent Fred Susor her view: A roof.

“I didn’t notice in the other building, and I really don’t notice the roof (here) because I have a pretty skyline,” Flick said. “I can still see the Owens buildings through the trees our here.”

Flick has 41 years in at the career center, starting in 1986 when it was still at the former Rossford Army Depot, which is now part of Owens Community College.

“We did outgrow that building,” said Flick, who is retiring at the end of this school year.

She has been an intervention specialist at Penta since she was hired in 1980.

Flick is one of those educators that brings her best every day, said Penta Superintendent Ed Ewers.

“We’re very happy for her to take the next stage of her life but she will be missed here at Penta,” he said. “I don’t know how you can stay in education for 41 years if you don’t care about the kids.”

Flick started her career teaching functional curriculum, which is how to budget money or rent an apartment. She now teaches English.

“I have a mixed classroom,” she said.

She has students who are autistic and with a specific learning disability, those who are emotionally disturbed, intellectually disabled and physically disabled.

“I’ve had deaf students and I’ve had visually impaired students as well,” Flick said.

The first year she taught, the majority of her students were intellectually disabled and some SLD students.

She had the first diagnosed Asperger’s individual at Penta in 2001. Autism wasn’t heard of them but now is a more prevalent.

“If we were to lay all the kids out from year one to year 41, there were years when I had students who had greater needs and in other years, a little bit lower.

“So are they basically the same kids? Yes,” Flick said. “They’re still having the same issues.”

The biggest disability area she now deals with is poor reading and written expression skills.

Her great-great-great-aunt taught in a one-room schoolhouse. She was still alive when Flick became a teacher.

Her interest in being an intervention specialist started when she was young, growing up next to a girl with Down Syndrome. Flick said she liked walking to school with her every day.

“I really am glad I chose the career I chose.”

Flick is a native of Monroe, Michigan, and graduated from the University of Toledo. She got the job at Penta the same year she graduated with a Bachelor of Education in special education. In 1984, she received her Master of Education in guidance and counseling.

Every day she tells her husband she is leaving for school, not to go to work.

“I still enjoy teaching … and I am now on the second generation of students,” Flick said. “It’s always interesting to sit across from the table at an IEP meeting looking at a parent who is a former student.”

She reads novels to her students, including “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” by British writer Mark Haddon. The narrator of the book is autistic.

“I find it intellectually challenging,” she said about why she has kept the same career for four decades. “Every year I get a new batch of kids that have new needs. I like seeing the ah-ha moments when someone says, ‘I got it.’”

One thing she won’t miss about school: Getting up every morning at 4:45.

Flick has five grandchildren, and she hopes to spend more time with them. All of her children live within an hour’s drive from where she and her husband Keith live in Sylvania. The couple just celebrated their 40th anniversary.

She wants to see the Smoky Mountains and the Appalachians in color – which she hasn’t been able to do while teaching. She also hopes to visit Bar Harbor, Maine, in the fall.

“That just sounds like something that sounds like fun and wonderful to do.”

Bowling Green Sentinel Tribune
Published 14 hours ago

Parents captured after son charged in Michigan school shooting

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — The parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at a Michigan high school were caught early Saturday, several hours after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them, officials said.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were captured in a commercial building in Detroit that housed artwork, Detroit Police Chief James E. White told a news conference. White said the couple “were aided in getting into the building,” and that a person who helped them may also face charges.

A Detroit business owner spotted a car tied to the Crumbleys in his parking lot late Friday, Oakland County Undersheriff Michael McCabe said in a statement. A woman seen near the vehicle ran away when the business owner called 911, McCabe said. The couple was later located and arrested by Detroit police.

A prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against the Crumbleys on Friday, accusing them of failing to intervene on the day of the tragedy despite being confronted with a drawing and chilling message — “blood everywhere” — that was found at the boy’s desk.

The Crumbleys committed “egregious” acts, from buying a gun on Black Friday and making it available to Ethan Crumbley to resisting his removal from school when they were summoned a few hours before the shooting, Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said.

Authorities had been looking for the couple since Friday afternoon. Late Friday, U.S. Marshals announced a reward of up to $10,000 each for information leading to their arrests.

The Crumbley’s attorney, Shannon Smith, said the pair had left town earlier in the week “for their own safety.” Smith told The Associated Press they would be returning to Oxford to be arraigned.

However, White said the Crumbleys “appeared to be hiding” in the building where they were found. He added that the parents appeared to be “distressed” when they were captured.

“Head down… just very upset,” he said of one of the parents.

The couple was expected to be booked into the Oakland County Jail, McCabe said.

Earlier, the prosecutor offered the most precise account so far of the events that led to the shooting at Oxford High School, roughly 30 miles (50 kilometers) north of Detroit.

Ethan Crumbley, 15, emerged from a bathroom with a gun, shooting students in the hallway, investigators said. He’s charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes.

Under Michigan law, the involuntary manslaughter charge filed against the parents can be pursued if authorities believe someone contributed to a situation where there was a high chance of harm or death.

Parents in the U.S. are rarely charged in school shootings involving their children, even as most minors get guns from a parent or relative’s house, according to experts.

School officials became concerned about the younger Crumbley on Monday, a day before the shooting, when a teacher saw him searching for ammunition on his phone, McDonald said.

Jennifer Crumbley was contacted and subsequently told her son in a text message: “Lol. I’m not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught,” according to the prosecutor.

On Tuesday, a teacher found a note on Ethan’s desk and took a photo. It was a drawing of a gun pointing at the words, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me,” McDonald said.

There also was a drawing of a bullet, she said, with words above it: “Blood everywhere.”

Between the gun and the bullet was a person who appeared to have been shot twice and is bleeding. He also wrote, “My life is useless” and “The world is dead,” according to the prosecutor.

The school quickly had a meeting with Ethan and his parents, who were told to get him into counseling within 48 hours, McDonald said.

The Crumbleys failed to ask their son about the gun or check his backpack and “resisted the idea of their son leaving the school at that time,” McDonald said.

Instead, the teen returned to class and the shooting subsequently occurred.

“The notion that a parent could read those words and also know that their son had access to a deadly weapon that they gave him is unconscionable — it’s criminal,” the prosecutor said.

Jennifer Crumbley texted her son after the shooting, saying, “Ethan, don’t do it,” McDonald said.

James Crumbley called 911 to say that a gun was missing from their home and that Ethan might be the shooter. The gun had been kept in an unlocked drawer in the parents’ bedroom, McDonald said.

Ethan accompanied his father for the gun purchase on Nov. 26 and posted photos of the firearm on social media, saying, “Just got my new beauty today,” McDonald said.

Over the long Thanksgiving weekend, Jennifer Crumbley wrote on social media that it is a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present,” the prosecutor said.

Asked at a news conference if the father could be charged for purchasing the gun for the son, McDonald said that would be the decision of federal authorities.

In a video message to the community Thursday, the head of Oxford Community Schools said the high school looks like a “war zone” and won’t be ready for weeks. Superintendent Tim Throne repeatedly complimented students and staff for how they responded to the violence.

He also acknowledged the meeting of Crumbley, the parents and school officials. Throne offered no details but summed it up by saying, “No discipline was warranted.”

McDonald was asked about the decision to keep Crumbley in school.

“Of course, he shouldn’t have gone back to that classroom. … I believe that is a universal position. I’m not going to chastise or attack, but yeah,” she said.

Asked if school officials may potentially be charged, McDonald said: “The investigation’s ongoing.”

___

White reported from Detroit. Associated Press journalist Mike Householder in Detroit and David Eggert in Lansing, Mich., also contributed to this report.

WKBN Fox 27 Youngstown
Published 14 hours ago